Apps that Love 1Password: Unread, Fantastical, Tonalli

This is another particularly delightful edition of Apps that Love 1Password since it’s so diverse. This time we have a hot new newsreader, one of the best calendar apps for iPhone, and a slick utility for tracking your project time with Tick.

Unread iconUnread

Unread for iPhone from Jared Sinclair is a beautiful, minimal newsreader for Feedly, FeedWrangler, and Feedbin. Jared cut out a lot of buttons and toolbars in favor of simple gestures to let you focus on reading and (optionally) sharing articles.

Unread’s login forms for FeedWrangler and Feedbin features a 1Password button so you can quickly find your accounts. The sharing feature also lets you open the current article or webpage in our 1Browser so you can use Identities to quickly register for services, or even Credit Cards so you can insta-buy what you just read about!

Unread is available for iPhone in App Store.

Fantastical iconFantastical 2

The Sweet Setup declared Fantastical 2 the best calendar app for iPhone, and it’s easy to see why. Fantastical is fast, a native iOS 7 citizen, and has optional support for Apple’s Reminders. One of its best features is that you can use natural language to create events and tasks, like “Lunch with Amy at 12:30″ to create an event, or “get milk /p” to add a Reminder to your Personal list.

As of Fantastical 2.0.5, you now have the option to open links in our 1Browser, making it much easier for you to securely log into services, register at new sites with 1Password Identities, and fill out shopping carts with one tap.

Fantastical 2 is available for iPhone in App Store.

Tonalli iconTonalli

For all you folks out there who need help tracking projects and the time you put into them, Tonalli is a minimal and free iPhone client for Tick. You can see your daily timecard, manage said timecards, and view reports and charts for all your projects.

A new 1Password button in Tonalli’s login screen should make it faster to log into your Tick account. You’ll switch to 1Password with an AutoSearch for Tick. Swipe the item to open the Action Bar, copy your password, then switch back to paste and get to tracking time.

Tonalli is available for iPhone in App Store.

As always, we thank the developers behind these and all the Apps that Love 1Password for making it easier to work, play, and stay secure both on- and offline with 1Password.

Apps that Love 1Password: Capitaine Train

Capitaine Train 9 icon1Password has built its name, in part, on three syllables. For the other part, it excels in helping you get around online more securely and conveniently, and it can be plenty useful off-line too. In fact, don’t take it from our past and future blog posts about all this, our Apps that Love 1Password has gained another real-world feather in its cap with the release of Capitaine Train, a transit booking app for iPhone.

Capitaine Train is a train ticket booking app for European systems, in particular France (SNCF, iDTGV, iDBUS), Germany (Deutsche Bahn), UK (Eurostar), Switzerland (Lyria), Belgium and Netherlands (Thalys) and more. You can search for trips, register multiple passengers, purchase tickets (of course), and even add your trips to your calendar and Passbook for easy access.

A new 1Password button in Capitaine Train 9.0 makes it easier to log into your account. Tap the button and you’ll switch to 1Password with an auto-search for your account. Swipe your Capitaine Train item to show the Action Bar, tap the clipboard to copy your password, then switch back to paste it in and get to booking.

Capitaine 1P button GIF

Apps that Love 1Password: Diet Coda, VSCO Cam

Our growing Apps that Love 1Password page got even more diverse recently with some great new additions: Diet Coda from the fine folks at Panic, and VSCO Cam.

Diet Coda iconDiet Coda

Diet Coda is an iPad-ified version of Coda for Mac, Panic’s venerable web code editor. Diet Coda speaks all the big web languages, sports a powerful text editor, and has great S/FTP tools to bring it all together.

In the new Diet Coda 1.5, adding a website you need to work on is easier than ever. When adding a new site, the password field has a new 1Password button that will switch over and automatically search your vault for the domain you entered. Just tap your item, tap the password field, tap “copy” in the popover that appears, and switch back to Diet Coda to enter your password and get editing.

VSCOcam iconVSCO Cam

VSCO Cam is a photo shooting, editing, and sharing app for iPhone from Visual Supply Co. It has its own unique sense of style and is backed by people who have done work for everyone from Apple to Levi’s to Nintendo. In other words: they know photography.

In a big VSCO Cam 3.0 upgrade, the company added quite the unique way to automatically search 1Password for your VSCO account password. Instead of a 1Password button in the password field, you can triple-tap the cam app’s login screen to make the switch. Once in 1Password, just swipe across your item to trigger the Action Bar, tap the clipboard to copy your password, then switch back to VSCO Cam to paste and get shooting and sharing.

We’d like to thank Panic and Visual Supply Co. for making it easier to login with 1Password. We really do appreciate it, and our mutual users love it.

Apps that Love 1Password: Treehouse for iPad – Learn programming and design

Treehouse iconWe’ve been blown away by the number of developers who have added 1Password support to their apps. So far we have browsers like iCab, enterprise tools like Cisco Meraki, and social media apps like Riposte and Tweetbot. Today we’re delighted to add education to this list, as Treehouse: Learn Programming and Design for iPad recently showed 1Password some love!

Treehouse bills itself as “the best way to learn technology.” Through a huge library of tutorial videos, code challenges, and quizzes, Treehouse can help you learn everything from Objective-C to CSS to starting a business. And it’s all right on your iPad.

Naturally, you’ll need to log into your Treehouse account, and now you can just tap the 1Password button on the account screen. You will be switched to 1Password with an auto-search for your Treehouse Login. Just swipe the item to trigger 1Password’s Action Bar, tap the clipboard to copy it, then switch back to Treehouse and paste to get your learn on.

Treehouse iPad 1P button

Apps that Love 1Password: Turbine Reader, Glassboard, Cisco Meraki

It’s that time of the year, at least here in the U.S.’s upper midwest and Canada. The first couple of winter storms have done their worst, it’s warmed up a little so the snow is starting to melt, and yet more iPhone and iPad apps have added support for 1Password.

Turbine Reader iconTurbine Reader

Turbine Reader for iPhone and iPad is a news client Feed Wrangler and News Blur, with more services coming soon. It’s a great iOS 7 citizen sporting a clean look, background updating, and an automatic night mode.

When it’s time to log into your chosen service, a “Launch 1Password” option above the login form will bounce you over to 1Password to make finding your Login a breeze. Just swipe your Login for the new Action Bar to copy your password and head on back.

Turbine Reader is just $4.99 in App Store.

Glassboard iOS icon 512Glassboard 3.0

Glassboard for iPhone is a private chat service for teams, groups, or just two individuals. You can share everything you would expect—photos, videos, and files—and even your location, and you can join as many different boards as you want.

Second Gear recently gave Glassboard a major overhaul, making it a sleek, beautiful iOS 7 citizen and even easier to use. While signing in, a new 1Password button makes it easy to switch to 1Password and find your Glassboard Login. Just swipe the item for 1Password’s Action Bar, tap the clipboard to copy your password, then switch back, paste, and get on with messaging your boards.

Glassboard is free in App Store and the free service lets you create up to three boards and host 100MB of stuff per board. If you want more, a small yearly subscription gives you all the boards you want, some extra features, and a ton more storage space.

Cisco Meraki iconCisco Meraki

Cisco Meraki for iPhone and iPad is an app for managing your Cisco Meraki wireless switches and access points for your business. You can view your wireless network’s status, check on specific Meraki access points and device types, and add more wireless capacity, all right from the app.

When logging into the Meraki app, a 1Password button makes it easy to find your Login. Swipe it to trigger the Action Bar, tap the clipboard to copy your password, and switch back to quickly log in and get on with work.

Meraki is free in App Store.

I think Secret Santa accidentally delivered a 1Password for iOS screenshot

The AgileBits team did its first Secret Santa this year, but I think the gift I (anonymously) received was meant for you. Yes, you.

Sure, we opened our first office in Toronto earlier this year, but a good portion of the company is still remote, which made pulling off a Secret Santa interesting. Maybe a little too interesting, though, because I think my Secret Santa gave me the screenshot you see below by accident. It just kinda showed up; I don’t know who it’s from (them’s the rules of Secret Santa), or what, specifically, it is, but I figured it’s my duty to make sure this gift gets delivered to its intended recipient.

It kinda looks like 1Password for iOS, except… different, don’t you think? I’ll get on the horn to the AgileBits Secret Santa Customer Support line and see what I can find out; you’ll know more when I do.

For now, happy holidays.

1P 4.5 iOS Secret Santa whoops

[Update - sale has ended, thanks everyone!] App Santa brings you 1Password and other great indie iOS apps at up to 60% off!

App Santa - 320x50@2x

Update – App Santa has packed it up for the season, so the sale has ended! Thanks everyone!

Our elf friends at Readdle, Contrast, and nearly a dozen other shops have been busy this holiday season, and we’ve put together the best present yet! Some of the most popular, useful, and just plain super iPhone and iPad apps, including 1Password for iOS, are up to 60% off!

1Password is just $9.99. Realmac Software’s beautifully simple to-do app Clear+ is just $1.99. One of my personal favorites, Bloom Built’s Day One journal/diary is only $2.99. App Santa has 15 apps in his sack this year, so whether they’re for yourself or friends or family, check out AppSanta.co for awesome deals on some of the best indie apps that could ever grace an iPhone or iPad.

If you’re looking for something password-y on the Mac for yourself or as a gift, we’re also celebrating two recent major awards with a 30%-off sale on 1Password for Mac!

Apps that Love 1Password: Delivery Status touch

Delivery Status Touch iconYou buy stuff online, and you need to know when it’s going to show up at your house, work, or your lucky recipient’s doorstep. For years, community favorite Delivery Status touch has made it, dare I say, fun to track your packages. Now it’s adding the convenience of 1Password.

Delivery Status touch 5.0 just hit the App Store and it is a whopper of an upgrade. In addition to big new features like optional background notifications, Calendar support, and iCloud sync, you can use the new 1Password integration to quickly log into services and add packages to track.

For supported services like Amazon and Google Checkout, Delivery Status touch can simply log into your account and pull down the details it needs. Tap the new 1Password button in the service login section, and you will switch to 1Password with your All Items list already filtered for the service you’re adding. Swipe across the Login item you want to trigger the Action Bar, tap the clipboard button to copy your password to the clipboard, then switch back to Delivery Status touch to finish logging in.

We’d like to thank the fine folks at Junecloud for adding 1Password support to their legendary delivery tracker. Be sure to pick up Delivery Status touch in the App Store, and if you’re a developer, learn how you can add some 1Password to your iOS apps!

Apps that Love 1Password: Money Pilot

Money Pilot Icon@152pStaying on top of your finances is a good idea, and so is managing them in a secure way. That’s why we’re happy to see a brand new iPhone app, Money Pilot from Victor Hudson, join the ranks of Apps that Love 1Password!

This is one of those apps that was born out of necessity—literally. Victor told me that he started managing his finances a decade ago using a spreadsheet. He built a system and got pretty good at it, but then he bought an iPhone and this approach just didn’t hold up on such a personal, mobile device. He looked for apps that could supplant his financial management spreadsheet, including Apple’s own Numbers for iOS, but ultimately decided he’d have to build it himself. And so Money Pilot was born.

Money Pilot is a financial record keeper and bill planner. You can plan bills around your pay schedule, see how much you actually can spend right now, and gain some of the automation of spreadsheets without all the overhead. Victor also added some clever 1Password support that he says was a “must have” for him, personally: you can add bank URLs for your accounts, then set 1Password’s 1Browser as the default browser for when it’s time to visit their websites.

Get Money Pilot now in the App Store for just $2.99, and be sure to leave a review to support Victor and help him make it even better! If you want to check out all the other apps that have added 1Password support, from Twitter clients to beer companions (no, really!), check out our Apps that Love 1Password page!

Interview with Joe Kissell, author of Take Control of 1Password

Joe Kissell illustratedWith our release of the all-new 1Password 4 for Mac this month, the venerable Joe Kissell also wrote a whole book for the Take Control series called Take Control of 1Password (on sale for just $10!). It’s a great look into getting setup with 1Password 4 for Mac and even iOS and Android, as well as all the real-world ways 1Password can be useful for passwords and beyond.

Since Joe went so in-depth into getting the most out of 1Password, I figured we should go in-depth on Joe, the Take Control series, and his thoughts on 1Password and the future of security. I reached out for an interview, and he had some great responses.

AgileBits: First off, thanks for writing a whole book about 1Password, that’s pretty great of you. For our customers who aren’t familiar with the Take Control books, can you give a rundown on what the series is about?

Take Control is a series of ebooks that help ordinary, nontechnical people understand and make the best use of technology. The idea is that you have a professionally written and edited explanation of some technical topic that’s much more detailed than a magazine article could be (say, 100–150 pages instead of 2–6) but far more manageable than a 500+ page printed book. And, since they’re ebooks, we can treat them much like software: we offer minor updates for free and discounted upgrades on major new editions. You click a link to check for updates, download the new version, and that’s that. So the content can stay up to date as the technology changes, and you don’t end up with this huge chunk of paper that’s outdated before you even read it the first time. And all this comes at a modest price—most of our books are around $10–15.

The majority of our books focus on Apple (Mac and iOS) technologies. But we’re increasingly covering topics that apply across platforms, such as online privacy, Dropbox, and (of course) 1Password. We’ve even had a few books in the series that weren’t about computers at all, including one I wrote about how to prepare Thanksgiving dinner!

This month is actually the 10th anniversary of Take Control Books. Ten years ago this spring, I got a call from Adam Engst, who is well-known in the Apple community as the publisher of TidBITS and the author of numerous books. I’d known Adam for a long time—I’d written some TidBITS articles and Adam had written a foreword to one of my books and so on. He said he had an idea for an experiment in electronic publishing, and wanted to know if I’d be interested in joining a small group of other authors and editors in trying out this new model. I said sure, and the first book I wrote in the series was “Take Control of Upgrading to Panther,” which came out the same day Panther (Mac OS X 10.3) did, in October 2003. It sold a bazillion copies, and the rest is history. (And, this month, in keeping with tradition, we shipped “Take Control of Upgrading to Mavericks“!

Take-Control-of-1Password-book-cover.jpeg

What about your Take Control of 1Password book, in particular? Is there an overall approach or theme you had in mind while writing it?

Earlier this year I wrote a general-purpose book on password security, “Take Control of Your Passwords“. That book was all about understanding password security generally—why you need to have excellent, strong, unique passwords; what makes one password better than another; and what strategies you can use to keep from being overwhelmed by passwords. Of course, using a password manager like 1Password is one aspect of that, although I take pains to say it’s not a complete solution in and of itself.

In the 1Password book, I wanted to say, OK, if you’ve chosen 1Password (which happens to be my favorite password manager) for that aspect of your password strategy, then here are all the details about doing the stuff you care about doing with it. It’s no good to just say, “Go out and buy this app” if a reader isn’t sure what to do with it, how to use it most effectively, how to solve problems, and so on. So that’s what I was trying to do with this book.

For whom did you write this book? Was there a type of user or skill level in mind?

Well, I was thinking of people like my wife (hi, honey!), who may have had 1Password for a long time but never quite grokked it. People who aren’t technophobic but also don’t wear propeller beanies, if you know what I mean. Ordinary folk who just want to get things done and appreciate a bit of patient, systematic hand-holding but don’t want to be talked down to.

It’s not that 1Password has such a steep learning curve, but you kind of have to get on board conceptually with its way of handling things. And I think the best way to do that is to walk through all the steps of creating, storing, and using passwords a few times, with the sites you use most frequently, so it’s not just a vague idea about what should happen but the actual experience of making it happen. I try to walk users through both the theory and the practice so that, hopefully, after a few tries the process clicks and they go, “Aha! Now I see how much better this is than the old way.”

So, as with all my books, I’m writing for an intelligent reader who just isn’t an expert in this particular thing. And I try to focus more on real-world tasks than on features. In other words, I don’t think that by simply cataloguing what every button and menu command does, I’d be teaching someone how to use the product. Instead, I frame it as, “You probably need to accomplish x, y, and z with this app. How do you go about doing that?”

Besides stronger passwords, do you have another favorite use or some tricks for getting more out of 1Password?

I keep all my software licenses in 1Password. At the moment, I have—let’s see—373 of them! I find, especially at times like these when a new OS version is coming out, that I’m reinstalling apps quite a bit and I have to say, I’ve kind of fallen in love with 1Password mini for quickly retrieving license codes. I launch an app and it asks for the code, and now I just press Command-Option-\, type a few letters of the app’s name to find it, arrow over and down to the password field, and press Return to copy the code. Click back in the app, paste, and I’m done. So much simpler than it used to be!

Another thing I suggest in my book is to include not only textual data, such as your credit card, driver’s license, and passport numbers, but scanned images of the items themselves, as attachments. If you ever lose one of these items, a scanned copy can be very helpful in getting it replaced (and also provides some supporting evidence that you are who you say you are).

What do you think are some of the challenges for the security software space in general?

Wow, where to even begin? Well, I’ll focus on a couple of issues. First is the actual security part—making products and services robustly hack-resistant. Some of the folks who want to break into people’s accounts and steal their data, money, or identity are extremely smart and, shall we say, dedicated. Staying ahead of them requires even more smarts and dedication. I’ve seen some pretty scary security products—I’m thinking of a couple of password managers in particular—where it’s evident that the developers didn’t have a deep understanding of things like entropy, encryption algorithms, and exploits, but just threw something together that seemed to basically work. Most users won’t know the difference—until they get hacked.

So I love reading the security posts on the AgileBits blog by Jeff Goldberg and Roustem, because they demonstrate an extensive, thorough knowledge of cryptography that shows you guys really do know the score.

The other side of that is usability. You could ask users to enter a password, type a code from an SMS message, and do a fingerprint scan every time they go to a new Web site, and that might be super secure, but it’s an unreasonable amount of effort for what you’re trying to accomplish. Tools like password managers have to not only be easy to use but to respect varied workflows. If a tool requires you to throw out all your habits to adapt to the one way it knows how to do things, or if it imposes unreasonable restrictions (like forcing you to use just one browser), it’s not being kind to users.

Now, it does make me a bit sad that 1Password has had to remove or alter certain useful features over the years in order to remain compatible with all browsers and platforms. I understand why that is—you have to work within what browser developers, and especially Apple, permit you to do, and those restrictions have gotten tighter. But man, I miss the time when I could visit a new Web site that asked me to generate a password and then, with a single click, create, fill in, submit, and memorize that password. Those were the days! And I’ve been lobbying for an option to fill in and submit a default set of credentials automatically when you load a page, no clicks or keystrokes required. I would love to see 1Password take that next step in usability.

You have a section called ‘Glimpse the future of 1Password.’ Care to offer a glimpse of that glimpse for your potential readers?

Part of the reason for that section was to reassure users who upgrade to version 4 and have a moment of “Hey, wait a minute! What happened to (my favorite feature)?!” During the version 4 beta testing, AgileBits staffers were constantly reminding everyone that, because it was a total rewrite as well as a redesign, a few of the elements people were used to in version 3 aren’t quite there yet, but will be soon—and there are big new features in the works too. I think one of the most important changes in version 4 is that 1Password was rethought in such a way that adding new features will be easier, and significant updates should be more frequent.

So, based on my discussions with AgileBits staff and what I read on the beta discussion boards, I expect to see things like more view options (not just the single-column list) and editing directly in 1Password mini, without having to open the full app. And I know that some bugs—er, design challenges—such as getting 1Password mini to work correctly on multiple displays are being addressed too.

One of the other things I mention there is that the Windows and Android versions of 1Password, which haven’t seen a lot of love lately, are actively being worked on to bring them to feature parity with the Mac and iOS versions.

Do you remember when you first found 1Password? Who or what got you into it?

I looked through my email archives, and the first mention of 1Passwd—it didn’t have the “or” in the name back then—was in July 2006, about a month after its version 1.0 release. I got a copy of version 1.3 to review for TidBITS, although for reasons I can no longer recall, that review didn’t appear until nearly a year later: 1Passwd Eases Password Pain in June 2007. My very first impression was one of puzzlement: I couldn’t figure out why someone would need an extra program to do something that any Web browser can do on its own. But the proverbial lightbulb went on as soon as I started using 1Passwd, and as early as October 2006, when Macworld was asking contributors for nominees for that year’s Editors’ Choice awards, I wrote to my editor, “I’m really jazzed about 1Passwd, which has quickly become indispensable for me.”

So, I’m proud to say I’ve been a user almost since the very beginning of the product. That year, 2006, was also when I wrote my first Take Control book about passwords (which was replaced with a much more modern title earlier this year). I’ve written an awful lot about passwords in the intervening years, and 1Password has been a faithful companion the whole time.

Thanks a lot Joe!

As you can see, Joe knows his stuff and we’re honored that he’s been with us since way back when the “1Password” name was missing a vowel. The Take Control series really is wonderful, so check out Take Control of 1Password and their other books to learn how to get more out of your apps.