A look back at a very Agile 2009

2009_fireworks.jpgWhat a year! We laughed, we cried, but fortunately, no one hurled. We kicked off 2009 by winning an award at Macworld, then expanded the company by hiring four new people, and hit our home stretch by releasing major new versions of both 1Password and AllBookmarks.

Plenty more happened along the way, though, so pull up a chair and look back with us at a very Agile year.

January 9, 2009: Agile Web Solutions wins Best of Show Award at Macworld for 1Password from Macsimum News / MacTech Magazine. Not a bad start, if we may say so ourselves.

Safari_icon.pngFebruary 25: Apple released a beta of Safari 4, and ever the agile (nyuk nyuk) company, we sprang into action the same day with support for it.

May 19: May was a good month for 1Password exposure. CNET made 1Password an Editor’s Choice, and NPR recommended 1Password twice to listeners.

May 29: Apple picks 1Password as a “Featured Download” on its official Downloads site.

June 2: 1Password touch 2.0 arrived with 1Password 2.9.16 and a rewritten Wi-Fi sync feature. Sync finally got a lot easier, but stayed just as secure as ever.

1Pt_logo.jpgJune 8: 1Password touch was spotted in Apple’s official iPhone 3GS Guided Tour video. It’s good to see Apple promoting (if only secondhand) the practice of staying secure even while on-the-go.

June 8-12: Agile Web Solutions partied it up got down to seriously serious business at WWDC 2009.

June 17: Apple released iPhone OS 3.0, and both versions of 1Password touch got their groove on. The standard version was ready for the new OS, and 1Password touch Pro gained some fancy new features powered by the new OS.

July: Macworld tipped its hat in our direction not one, not two, but three times. First, Macworld’s Joe Kissell called 1Password “outstanding” and touted our Strong Password Generator, then he highlighted that 1Password is great for organizing a lot more than passwords. Macworld’s Dan Frakes upped the ante later in July, though, by creating a video called “Why [Macworld] loves 1Password](http://www.switchersblog.com/2009/07/why-macworld-loves-1password.html). Thanks again for such kind words and videos guys!

July 16: Twittergate. Twitter got hacked and hundreds of the company’s internal business documents were stolen (note: not the usernames or passwords of Twitter users). Now we are always bummed and sympathetic when something terrible like this happens. But we were also honored that Twitter co-founder Evan Williams recommended 1Password in the wake of the hack.

SnowLeopard_box.jpgAugust 26: We didn’t want Snow Leopard beta users to suffer life without 1Password, so we released a limited beta of 1Password 3 for those who ventured forth.

Fun (non)fact: forcing Mac users to go without 1Password is considered torture in some countries. Honest. But don’t look that up; just trust me.

October 28: We swung open the doors to the public for the 1Password 3 beta. There was much rejoicing. And testing.

November 19: 1Password 3 gets all grown up and sheds the beta badge. There was much rejoicing. Again.

November 24: We gave away 1Password touch for free as a Thanksgiving Thank You sale to our customers.

November 30: Leo Laporte, tech and podcasting pioneer of the TWiT network, picked 1Password 3 for his MacBreak Weekly Pick of the Week.

December 8: Google’s new Chrome browser finally came to the Mac in a very early official beta, and our master code chefs sprang to action. We began cooking up a brand new extension for Chrome, and while it is still in the oven, our 1Password Logins Bookmarklet can bring a little 1Password 3 to Chrome for now.

AllBookmarks_icon.pngDecember 11: Not ones to rest on our laurels, we released AllBookmarks 4.0, a major update to our free browser bookmarks aggregator. The new version gained support for 1Password 3 bookmarks, a keyboard shortcut, and running in 64-bit on Snow Leopard.

To make sure Agile Web Solutions can continue to be all it can be, make great software, and provide speedy support to our stellar customers, we also hired four more ninjas throughout the year. Not including accountants and lawyers, we’re up to 12 Agile folks now, and in 2009 we welcomed Marty Skinner, David Brown, Cindy Compton, and me to the team. At least I think I was welcomed to the team. Jamie stole my red stapler the first week I was here, and they keep moving my desk towards the basement stairs.

We’d like to say thanks to the people who made this all possible, so: thank you. Yes you, dear customer of Agile Web Solutions and reader of the blog. We couldn’t make great software for a living without you, and we look forward to making more great stuff for you in 2010.

Happy New Year
everyone!
The Agile Web Solutions team

Tip: Add tags when saving new Logins from your browser

SaveTo1P-tags

Among the 30 improvements we added to 1Password 3.0.2 yesterday is a new box for tags in our Save to 1Password tool. Now when you save a new Login from Safari, Firefox, and other dedicated browsers, you’ll be able to add tags (support for organizing your items with tags is new in 1Password 3). In addition to customizing the Login’s name and placing it in a folder, this adds another powerful layer of 1Password organization right in your browser.

Tip: Get a little 1Password 3 in Google Chrome (and Opera!) now (Updated again!)

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Update! Check here for updated news on the Chrome extension, it’s come a long way!

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Google released the first official beta of Chrome for Mac on Tuesday. Many of our customers have been asking for us to support Chrome, so we have both good and bad news about this release. I’ll get the bad news out of the way because I think the good news will make up for it.

The (Temporarily) Bad News

Unfortunately, we have to wait for Google before we can officially support Chrome because extensions were turned off for this release, and Chrome for Mac itself is in a constant state of flux. A lot of under-the-hood changes come fairly frequently – changes you may not see as users, but changes that, as developers, can be quite significant, difficult, and time-consuming to repeatedly adjust for.

These changes are great for progress, but bad for small software shops like us who can’t afford the time and manpower to keep up with such an evolving beta project. Our ability to maintain rapid support response times and update 1Password for the Mac and iPhone would suffer, and I don’t think any of us would want that.

The Good News – Get A Little 1Password in Chrome now!

Update: Thanks to Leo M in the comments below, I’ve updated this process to slim down to just two steps for most users.

If you’re just dying – dying! – to use 1Password in Chrome for Mac right now, the good news is that you can. A little. While we don’t have an official extension that will load in Chrome yet, you can use 1Password 3’s new Logins Bookmarklet feature to create a 1Password bookmarklet in Safari that contains your Logins, then import your Safari bookmarks into Chrome. Here’s a quickie on how to set it up:

1. Create a Logins Bookmarklet in 1Password 3 from the gear menu in the lower left.

#alttext#

Pick which logins and folders you want this bookmarklet to contain, set an access code at the top (make it a good one!), and click “Update Now” in the lower right to add the bookmarklet to Safari.

2. Drag your Logins Bookmarklet from Safari to Chrome

Chrome-LoginsBookmarklet-2.jpg

  • Open both Safari and Chrome, then resize or move them so you can see both on screen at once.
  • In Chrome, choose View > Always Show Bookmarks Bar
  • In Safari, choose Bookmarks > Show All Bookmarks, then drag the Logins Bookmarklet from Safari’s bookmarks sidebar to Chrome’s Bookmarks Bar

Alternate Version: If you want to import all Safari Bookmarks

Chrome allows you to import all your bookmarks from Safari (and Firefox for that matter). If you go this route instead, you’ll have to move your Logins Bookmarklet to Safari’s Bookmarks Menu or Bookmarks Bar before importing into Chrome, as Chrome cannot see bookmarks in Safari’s “Collections” sidebar.

After performing Step 1 from above, continue here:

2. Organize your Logins Bookmarklet

#alttext#

Because Chrome For Mac does not offer even basic bookmark organization features, you’ll need to organize your Logins Bookmarklet in Safari before importing to Chrome.

By default, 1Password will add your Logins Bookmarklet to Safari’s Collections area, so you’ll need to move it to a more Chrome-friendly location. Open Safari, go to Bookmarks > Show All Bookmarks, then click either the Bookmarks Bar or Bookmarks Menu sections. Drag the Logins Bookmarklet into the section or folder you prefer.

3. Import into Chrome

The first time you start Chrome, it will offer to import your information from another browser. If this is your first time running Chrome, Make sure Safari is selected, then click “Start Google Chrome” to perform the import and get to Chroming.

#alttext#

If you have already been running Chrome and need to import your Safari bookmarks, go to Chrome > Import Bookmarks and Settings option to start the import tool manually.

4. Enjoy a little 1Password in Chrome

#alttext#

When you need to log into a site in Chrome, just click your Logins Bookmarklet to open a nifty 1Password overlay window. Type in the Access Code you set in step 1, click the proper Login, and watch the magic happen.

Let us know what you think

The Chrome for Mac beta just came out this morning, so we haven’t had a lot of time to test how our Logins Bookmarklet performs in Chrome yet. It should be able to fill most sites that 1Password can, and it should present only the relevant Logins for each site. As always, though, we’re open to feedback, so comment here or get in touch with support to let us know how it goes.

As a reminder though, official support for Chrome is coming, but we don’t have an ETA to share yet. Google definitely means “beta” this time, so we’re keeping an eye on Chrome’s progress and will enhance it with 1Password as soon as possible.

Super Extra Important Things To Know

  • Our Logins Bookmarklet feature is one-way, so you can’t add new Logins to it from Chrome. It was originally designed as a tool to make it easier to use your Logins in Mobile Safari on iPhone and iPod touch, but it just so happens to work fine with desktop, standards-based browsers like Chrome, too
  • Just like its name states, the Logins Bookmarklet only does 1Password Logins; it does not bring your 1Password Identities or Credit Cards to Chrome
  • Be sure to use a complex password for your Logins Bookmarklet Access Code. You can make it the same as your 1Password Master Password if that’s already pretty strong, but for the ultimate in security, you should probably make it something different. All the usual rules still apply: use a special character or two, use capital and lower-case letters, no plain language words, etc. Just like 1Password, and any password management system for that matter, the security of the information in your Logins Bookmarklet relies on the strength of your Access Code.
  • Opera users: After brief testing, Logins Bookmarklets appear to work in Opera 10, too. While our official policy on Opera support is still that we can’t do it because Opera does not (and does not plan to) offer the proper extension support that third parties like us need, a Logins Bookmarklet is at least an option for you.

Chrome support is coming, but waiting on Google

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Update! Check here for updated news on the Chrome extension, it’s come a long way!

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Chrome_icon.jpgAt version 4, Google Chrome will finally get around to the Mac. We’re almost as excited as you are for a shiny new browser, which is why we’ve updated our official Google Chrome support status on our browser requirements page to “working on it.”

The first official, public beta of Chrome 4 for Mac is imminent. But we’re going to need some time to work on supporting Chrome because Google needs more time in order to let third-party developers support Chrome. An official changelog on the Google Chrome release blog for developers says that extensions are disabled in a recent developer release, and will remain so for the first Mac beta. That means Chrome needs some more time in the beta oven before it’s ready to let extensions like ours add features and functionality.

Rest assured, we’re keeping an eye on Chrome’s development. While even the developer versions may look and work fine for many users, the fact that it is not even in beta yet means that a tremendous amount of code, features, and API implementations are in flux “under the hood.” We need to wait for Chrome’s dust to settle a bit so we don’t sacrifice our ability to make great, reliable software and respond quickly to support requests.

Bottom line: when Chrome is ready for extensions, we will enhance it with 1Password.

Leo Laporte chooses 1Password 3 for his MacBreak Weekly Pick

macbreak_leo.pngWe want to extend a big thanks to Leo Laporte, the brains and voice behind the TWiT Netcast Network, for choosing 1Password 3 as his Pick of the Week in MacBreak Weekly episode 168!

Leo touts a number of features in the upgrade like the new software licenses section, file attachments, Edit in Browser, tags, and others, then says “1Password 3 is easily the best password management utility on the Mac.” Who are we to argue with Leo Laporte? Thanks a bunch for the kind words Leo!

This year we're thankful for you: Get 1Password for iPhone for free!

1Password Thanksgiving

We here at Agile Web Solutions love making great software, but we wouldn’t have gotten anywhere without you. Yes you: our customer, there reading this at your office desk, or at home on the couch, on the bus, or while sipping a Caramel Macchiato. 

You are the reason we get to make software. So to celebrate Thanksgiving we want to give thanks to you by giving away 1Password for iPhone and iPod touch. For a week. For free.

Yes, you read that right. 1Password and 1Password Pro are available for free in the iTunes App Store until 12:01am, December 1, 2009. No tricks, no fine print, no strings attached.

You should be able to see these new, Thanksgiving-compatible prices in iTunes now. Of course, with both versions available at the same low price, you have your pick between the standard and pro versions. 1Password Pro contains all the same features as the standard version, as well as a few extra perks like Quick Copy and Paste, more convenient copying of multiple items to paste into Safari (such as a username and a password), and syncing folders from 1Password on the Mac to keep your stuff organized.

1Password Pro is also slated to gain a few more pro-level features over time, including Favorites for quick access to your most-used items and wireless, over-the-air syncing via MobileMe/WebDAV. You can read more about the differences between 1Password and 1Password Pro for iPhone, but if you are at all curious about having a few more perks now and down the road, you might as well download 1Password Pro.

If you are going to switch versions because of this sale (say, you upgrade from the standard version you got a while ago to pro, or vice versa), be sure to follow our instructions on how to switch. Because of the iPhone OS security model, 1Password Pro cannot read data created by the standard edition. Follow that help document, though, and you’ll be good to go.

1PtFree

If you do not see these prices yet – as in, you still see the regular prices of $4.99 and $.7.99 – Apple’s iTunes networking gnomes may still be working their magic, so give it a little time.

But again, Agile Web Solutions customers: thanks. We couldn’t have come this far without you.

- Agile Web Solutions staff

Rockstar Customers Roundup: 1Password 3 beta and other reviews

Over the years, 1Password has won quite a few awards and testimonials from the press and happy customers alike. Naturally, when we find out about these kind words, we take a short break from trying to make 1Password even more awesome, congratulate each other on a job well done, and humbly collect the sentiment for our Testimonials page. We then get back to work right away, but I figured it was time to start thanking our rockstar customers in a more public venue like, for example, this blog, for saying nice things about 1Password.

Thus begins a new quasi-regular series dubbed “Rockstar Customers” here on the Agile Web Solutions blog, where we highlight new and notable testimonials from our customers and the media. Our customers really do say the darndest things, and the least we can do is offer a hat-tip in return!

As icing on the cake, this week is a killer time to kick this series off due to 1Password 3 going public beta. We’ve had some great reactions and general feedback so far, so let’s get to it:

Gordon Schulz, “1Password is just awesome and even more”:

I read about 1Password on macnews.de today. That’s it. Played around with the software for 15 minutes and bought it. Sad thing is – you can’t describe how awesome it is with words, you have to use it. Then you will want it. For ages I have been using crappy passwords, same passwords on multiple sites, etc… no more.

John Hickman:

It is truly an awesome piece of software! It is a must app for me and I always pass on my opinion for this app being a must own. I look forward to your official release! Keep up the great work.

Brett Kelly, TUAW, 1Password 3 Beta brings a sweet new interface and Snow Leopard support:

“Several of us at TUAW are big fans of 1Password, and today our pointy party hats are standing taller than ever thanks to the opening of the public beta for 1Password 3. This new version brings with it a massive list of changes, improvements and new features.

Nicholas Bonsack, Macworld, 1Password 3 beta now open to all:

If you missed out when Agile Web Solutions was offering a private beta of 1Password 3 to customers on Snow Leopard, there’s good news! 1Password 3 is now available as a public beta for one and all. Yes, that means you. Feel special? You should!

Erik Vlietinck, IT Enquirer, 1Password version 3 review:

Agile Web Solutions has released a public beta of its version 3 of 1Password, and if you thought (like I did) they couldn’t improve this industry leading password and license manager anymore, they’ve proven us wrong. 1Password 3 is nicer to look at, better structured, and has time saving features even.

Jacqui Cheng, Ars Technica: 1Password 3.0 goes public beta with Snow Leopard support:

Agile released the public beta of 1Password 3.0, taking us one step closer to native password management bliss.

Justin Williams, My Ultimate Developer and Power Users Tool List for Mac OS X:

I love [1Password] in so many ways because it has made my life so much easier when it comes to remembering logins, filling out web forms, etc.

MacNN:

Agile launches public beta of 1Password 3

That’s it for this first Rockstar Customers roundup, but we’re keeping an ever-watchful eye on feedback across the web. Until next time!

David Chartier
Chief Media Producer, Agile Web Solutions

Come one, come all, and get your 1Password 3 public beta

1P3Software

You’ve waited patiently, commented, posted in our forums, and tweeted about getting your hands on a public beta of 1Password 3. Some of you probably even sent smoke signals and carrier pigeons, and we apologize if we missed them (though I think one of the latter failed to miss my wife’s car). After all this, I am quite thrilled to be able to tell you that today is the day.

If you check out our Downloads page, you will find a new 1Password 3 public beta link. In the spirit of the whole “public” thing, this is open to all users running Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard and 10.6 Snow Leopard. Just like Lieutenant Commander Data, the public beta is fully functional, so you can help us test all the new features and jump on our Early Bird upgrade discount as a thank you for being the valiant beta tester that you are.

A crucial note before trying the 1Password 3 public beta

If you’re still using the Mac OS X Keychain to store your 1Password data, you will need to upgrade to the Agile Keychain before trying 1Password 3. Because of some complexities of the Mac OS X Keychain, you will run into a number of tedious and unnecessary security prompts if you are still using it to store your 1Password data and upgrade to version 3. If you perform the Agile Keychain upgrade in that User Guide document I linked, you should have smooth sailing when you fire up 1Password 3.

Go forth, and beta

Since we’re calling this the “1Password 3 public beta,” you may have deduced by now that this is, in fact, a beta. The “public” bit betrays our confidence that this release is pretty solid, but the “beta” says that we may still have a few wrinkles to iron out. As always, be sure to back up your data, fasten your seat belts, and get your daily supply of protein, fiber, and essential vitamins. They do a beta tester good.

If you find bugs, have questions, or want to share some kind words, drop by our 1Password 3 for Mac support forum so everyone can join the conversation. Our ninja support staff keeps a constant, watchful eye there, but other users may want to discuss the same topic. With any luck, it may have already been covered there. Also: our support staff is literally made up of ninjas. They don’t speak, and you can never catch them actually entering or leaving the building. But somehow, a lot of work just ends up being done at the end of the day, and I occasionally find an IOU in place of the lunch I brought from home. It’s pretty amazing.

David Chartier
Chief Media Producer, Agile Web Solutions

We certainly hope the world doesn't end like this

Frank-Ernest-World-End-Password.gif

Considering that today is Thanksgiving in Canada, we figured it’s a good time to lighten things up a bit (fun fact: Agile Web Solutions’ two co-founders live in Canada). Coincidentally, this Frank & Ernest comic was shared with us by Terry Brock on Twitter just this morning. We sure are thankful to have a product that should help prevent the world from ending, or at least, from ending this way.

But seriously: we’re thankful for you, our customers. Without your business, compliments, requests, and help with testing, we wouldn’t have 1Password and AllBookmarks.

Thanks everyone.
Agile Web Solutions staff

Hotmail breach exposes all-too-common passwords

WeakChainLink.jpgHave you reset your password recently? If you use a password that is anything like the 10,000 that were just stolen and leaked from Hotmail users, you might want to.

As the story goes, an anonymous user published a list of over 10,000 stolen passwords from Hotmail users. Researchers and security firms like Acunetix immediately pounced on the opportunity to study the password habits of this sizable sample of common users.

Want to know what the most frequently used password on the list is? “123456.” How about the second-most used? “123456789.” Other popular passwords are spanish names like “alberto,” phrases like “iloveyou,” as well as even “000000” and “america.”

Now this may come as a shock to you, but we’re fans of using passwords that are just a tad more complex. Common words and simple number schemes are pretty easy for password cracking tools to sniff out these days, which is why we’re pretty proud of one of our most popular 1Password features: the Strong Password Generator. This powerful tool creates extremely secure passwords for you, like “1LdcHo2