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The Fellowship of the 1Password Extension completes its mission

Ages ago, in a land far from this one, our merry band of developers and designers, known as The Fellowship of the 1Password Extension, set out to complete two missions: destroy some gold ring with a creepy, invisible inscription, and rebuild our 1Password browser extension from byte-one for Safari, Chrome, and Firefox on OS X and Windows. The journey was long, and much code was lost and reborn along the way. But at long last, we are pleased to announce that our new extension now works for all the major browsers with its arrival on Firefox for Windows.

Oh, and the aforementioned ring is also toast.

With our recent release of 1Password extension version 3.9, we now support Firefox for Windows. That means we now have one powerful, core code base that makes it much easier for us to support Safari, Chrome, and Firefox across both OS X and Windows.

All of the main 1Password extension features are here in Firefox for Windows (save for any browser-specific perks like the 1Password Omnibar trick in Chrome). To get it, all you need to do is open 1Password for Windows, click Preferences in the toolbar, then click the Browsers tab, and click the Firefox option. Our extension download page will open in Firefox, and you can follow the brief instructions there.

This completes an important chapter in our saga, and the Fellowship of the 1Password Extension can finally rest, or perhaps grab a beer with the Elves in Rivendell. But, of course, 1Password’s journey is never truly over—there is still much work to be done, and the Fellowship will stand ready for action.

1Password extension gets Firefox import, some nips and tucks

You’d think our developers would take some time off over the holidays. You know, put down Xcode and pick up their child, a Michael Bublé album, and some eggnog.

You would be half right.

Our resident code architects somehow found time over the last few days to polish an update to our new 1Password extension for Safari, Firefox, and Chrome on Mac, as well as Safari and Chrome on Windows (Firefox for Windows support is still on the way for the new extension, but those customers can still install the previous extension from 1Password’s preferences).

1Password extension 3.8.9 gained some great improvements to Autosubmit (especially on sites like iCloud.com and iWork.com) and better mouse interaction. But there’s a big new feature too: “Import Saved Firefox Passwords.” As the name suggests, there is a new button in the extension’s Settings panel that allows you to import Logins from Firefox’s built-in password manager.

Now I know what some of you are about to ask: “So when will Safari and Chrome get this?” We can’t promise anything just yet, because due to the way those browsers stored your Logins before you installed 1Password, they’re tougher challenges. Rest assured, we’re working on it, so stay tuned.

Your browser should automatically update your 1Password extension to this v3.8.9 update, but you might need to check your browser’s extension manager to make sure automatic updates are installed. Here’s the full changelog:

New

Added “Import Saved Firefox Passwords” button in Settings to automatically import passwords from Firefox’s internal password manager.

Changed

  • Improved Autosubmit algorithm, including websites like iCloud.com and iWork.com.
  • Updated Firefox Add-on SDK (Jetpack) to latest version.Using “Helper” instead of “Agent” in messages shown to the user.
  • Added the ability to disable unlock animations to work around a freezing issue in Chrome.
  • To disable unlock animations, go to the Settings > About and click the 1Password icon to reveal the Advanced settings.

Fixed

  • Logins within the All Logins section now highlight during mouseover and properly reveal the View Details arrow.
  • Changed supported Firefox’s max-version “12.*” to “12.0a1″ to avoid being marked as incompatible.
  • Password generator sliders in Firefox now update the generated password.
  • Now properly filling Logins on sites that (incorrectly) use the same HTML element id for multiple input fields. For example, NAB Internet Banking.