Introducing Travel Mode: Protect your data when crossing borders

We often get inspired to create new features based on feedback from our customers. Earlier this month, our friends at Basecamp made their Employee Handbook public. We were impressed to see they had a whole section about using 1Password, which included instructions for keeping work information off their devices when travelling internationally.

We knew right away that we wanted to make it easier for everyone to follow this great advice. So we hunkered down and built Travel Mode.

Travel Mode is a new feature we’re making available to everyone with a 1Password membership. It protects your 1Password data from unwarranted searches when you travel. When you turn on Travel Mode, every vault will be removed from your devices except for the ones marked “safe for travel.” All it takes is a single click to travel with confidence.

It’s important for me that my personal data be as secure and private as possible. I have data on my devices that’s ultimately a lot more sensitive than my personal data though. As one of the developers here at AgileBits I’m trusted with access to certain keys and services that we simply can’t take any risks with.

How it works

Let’s say I had an upcoming trip for a technology conference in San Jose. I hear the apples are especially delicious over there this time of year. :) Before Travel Mode, I would have had to sign out of all my 1Password accounts on all my devices. If I needed certain passwords with me, I had to create a temporary travel account. It was a lot of work and not worth it for most people.

Now all I have to do is make sure any of the items I need for travel are in a single vault. I then sign in to my account on 1Password.com, mark that vault as “safe for travel,” and turn on Travel Mode in my profile. I unlock 1Password on my devices so the vaults are removed, and I’m now ready for my trip. Off I go from sunny Winnipeg to hopefully-sunnier San Jose, ready to cross the border knowing that my iPhone and my Mac no longer contain the vast majority of my sensitive information.

After I arrive at my destination, I can sign in again and turn off Travel Mode. The vaults immediately show up on my devices, and I’m back in business.

Not just a magic trick

Your vaults aren’t just hidden; they’re completely removed from your devices as long as Travel Mode is on. That includes every item and all your encryption keys. There are no traces left for anyone to find. So even if you’re asked to unlock 1Password by someone at the border, there’s no way for them to tell that Travel Mode is even enabled.

In 1Password Teams, Travel Mode is even cooler. If you’re a team administrator, you have total control over which secrets your employees can travel with. You can turn Travel Mode on and off for your team members, so you can ensure that company information stays safe at all times.

Travel Mode is going to change how you use 1Password. It’s already changed the way we use it. When we gave a sneak peak to our friends at Basecamp, here’s what their founder, David Heinemeier Hansson, had to say:

International travel while maintaining your privacy (and dignity!) has become increasingly tough. We need better tools to help protect ourselves against unwarranted searches and the leakage of business and personal secrets. 1Password is taking a great step in that direction with their new Travel Mode. Bravo.

Travel Mode is available today, included in every 1Password membership. Give it a shot, and let us know how you travel with 1Password.

Learn how to use Travel Mode on our support site.

121 replies
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  1. Rick Fillion
    Rick Fillion says:

    I suspect that a number of you are going to have the same question, so let’s see if I can answer it before it’s even asked: “Does this also work with Standalone vaults synced with Dropbox/iCloud?”

    Travel Mode is limited to 1Password.com accounts, and there’s no way to directly interact with it within the apps themselves. It’s an example of a feature that’s now possible with a centralized service that can coordinate everything for all of your devices, and provide a place to control settings outside of the apps themselves.

    It’s exciting to see the door open up for features like this. In fact, Travel Mode was built without having our apps needing to be aware of it at all. And that’s a good thing.

    Reply
    • Sam
      Sam says:

      Maybe I’m just dumb, but I don’t see how AB’s centralized server has anything to do with the feasibility of this feature.

      It seems like it would be simple enough to let me tick a checkbox on my workstation that says “this machine never travels”, and then have “travel mode” treat that as my “centralized server” for the purposes of this feature. When I enable “travel mode”, it can wipe vaults from my laptop and tablet, knowing they’re safe on my workstation.

      I’ve been a happy 1Password user for many years, but it’s getting difficult to see the recent offerings as anything but “please stop using the standalone app, and start paying us a monthly fee to store all your passwords online”.

    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Hi Sam,

      Always nice to hear from a long term user. :) Let’s take a quick look at this.

      We could come pretty close to this feature with WLAN sync, I think. In the case of WLAN sync you have your “centralized server” (the desktop), and you’ve got the other devices that sync based on it. You could enable Travel Mode from the desktop which would cause the WLAN Server to stop serving up those vaults. That’s a good start. Now we’ve got a couple problem. The biggest issue is that you can’t re-enable it until you’re back around your desktop. The second issue is that your desktop is likely to travel with you. I know mine does.

      With Dropbox/iCloud sync, there just isn’t a relationship between vaults, nor between devices to fascilitate this. You can approximate it by going to each device and removing unnecessary vaults (and making sure that you remember their passwords). Then when safe you can re-add those vaults. It’s doable, but that lack of relationship makes it tedious. And then which device controls all of it? The basic idea in standalone vaults is that it’s all peer to peer, and that’s great for a lot of things. It also has its limitations though.

      I hope this helps explain things. Blog comments are a little hard for long form answers. If you ping me on our forum or via email I’d love to discuss this in depth with you.

      Cheers.

      Rick

    • Tom S
      Tom S says:

      Sam,

      While I can’t speak for the AgileBits team, the major theme behind Travel Mode seems to be the fact that the data isn’t present on your device and that there’s no possible way to get around it. Even if a comparable, modified approach could be managed by splitting up vault files, all of that data could still be accessed indirectly via Dropbox/iCloud. There’s no way around that without third-party access.

      That’s the unavoidable issue that likely dictated how Travel Mode was implemented. While the data stored on Dropbox/iCloud might be encrypted, that’s not a defense to the problem Travel Mode and other precautions are meant to resolve. The purpose is to ensure that the travel unfriendly data can’t be accessed because it’s not present to be accessed.

      Unless you logout of Dropbox on your phone/laptop/other devices, trash the 1Password files in your ~/Dropbox folder on your laptop, and remove your Dropbox info from 1Password, the data is still indirectly accessible. And as such, border agents have a viable—albeit indirect—route to access it.

      Do I think it’s likely that border agents will recognize that you’re using a Dropbox-synced vault and that there’s a way to get you to access it indirectly via Dropbox? Not at all, unless you’re being targeted specifically. In which case, you have much bigger concerns. But Agile Bits couldn’t market Travel Mode as they do if the possibility existed.

      I’ve used the standalone app, synced through Dropbox, for years. I love it, but it sacrifices some functionality (teams and families, etc.) because of limitations on how that functionality can be implemented. That might be unfortunate, but it’s made clear from the beginning.

  2. Tangible
    Tangible says:

    The existence of this feature isn’t going to be unknown to security agents. At the US border, CBP can confiscate devices if you refuse to provide your passwords. Once they have 1PW unlocked, won’t it become routine for them to turn off travel mode, knowing you may have turned it on?

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Good question. You can unlock 1Password and there is no way to disable Travel Mode from within the app, nor is there any hint that you’re currently in Travel Mode.

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      You are absolutely correct, Tangible. Let me add a bit to what Rick has already pointed out.

      The goal is not to convince anyone that certain secrets don’t exist. It is to keep certain secrets off of your devices when you are entering situation where those devices may be searched.

      What we are doing here is offering to everyone something that at AgileBits have already been doing for ourselves. I am a member of several 1Password Teams and Families (as are most of us at AgileBits). What I have been doing is unsubscribing to certain Teams when traveling and resubscribing later. But that solution isn’t available to most people who don’t have as many different Teams as we do here.

      By making this available on the vault level, we give everyone the opportunity to decide what is and what isn’t on their device under certain circumstances.

    • Alex
      Alex says:

      I think the feature is poorly named, and that leads to confusion like this.

      It’s not a “mode” at all. It’s more like a big red button that will “nuke all local copies of non-travel-safe password vaults”.

      Nobody can “turn it off”, any more than they can un-burn the ashes of some papers (or even tell that those papers used to have passwords written on them).

    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      I disagree with the idea that this isn’t a mode, Alex. You’re right that it behaves much like that big red button, though.

      It’s a mode on the user account. When in this mode, the user account isn’t allowed to store these vaults locally.

    • Alex
      Alex says:

      Rick: I guess we’ll have to agree-to-disagree, then. I don’t know of any other “mode” in any program I’ve ever used where entering the mode deletes data, in a different context than where I am right now.

      It sounds to me like you’re thinking about a technical aspect of the implementation (it’s a flag on the user’s account record, therefore, technically a mode!), rather than its obvious behavior to the user (this deletes stuff from your iPad).

      Even with an explanatory blog post, a good number of people here are misunderstanding what it does. As a developer myself, I take the position that users are right. If they don’t understand something, it’s the software that’s wrong, not them.

    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      That’s a good point, Alex. I think that we need to do a better job of explaining it, especially since there’s a destructive side to it as you’ve said.

      Rick

    • Carl Seghers
      Carl Seghers says:

      Rick:
      “You can unlock 1Password and there is no way to disable Travel Mode from within the app, nor is there any hint that you’re currently in Travel Mode.”

      I don’t get it.. how do you disable it then?

    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Carl,

      To disable it, you have to sign in to the 1password.com website with your account credentials. Does that clear it up?

      Rick

    • Jeremiah
      Jeremiah says:

      I absolutely expect the next escalation of this war to be them asking you to sign into the website. The duress password idea has the best chance of being effective for that.

    • Jacob
      Jacob says:

      It very well could be, Jeremiah. If that does happen, there are some other great ideas out there, like the duress password you mentioned.

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Hi Jeremiah! You are not alone in recommending a duress password, but I’d recommend that people consider such things more carefully.

      Remember that you are dealing with an “attacker” who has the power to compel you to decrypt data. If they discover that you have given them fake data (either during the encounter or at some point afterwards), there may be very severe consequences.

      I personally recommend that people do not attempt to deceive or mislead border officials. I’ve written more about this in our forums.

    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Thanks for asking that, as I had a feeling some people might wonder exactly this. 1Password will work just fine. 1Password works on the idea that you’re sometimes going to be offline (not connected to the internet) and it makes sure that it has everything you would need when that’s the case.

      This new feature allows you to specifically have a portion of your data removed from your device so that you’re carrying less data with you. So it’s not that 1Password couldn’t travel before, it absolutely could. It’s that 1Password now lets you travel with less data.

    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      This is a good question. It will be interesting to see how this plays out. We have some ideas that we’re working on that will hopefully help should this become a problem.

      Rick

    • Matthew
      Matthew says:

      Nothing stops them from telling you to sign into 1password.com. But nothing stops you from signing in with a “duress password” that causes 1password.com to behave differently than if you had provided your actual master password. (That one’s free, AgileBits 😉 Love ya!)

    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Thanks for commenting, Matthew.

      You’re right. We’ve talked (internally) about the concept of a duress password a few times. It’s an interesting idea, but there are concerns there as well.

      Rick

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Hi Matthew,

      We have talked about duress passwords in the past on our forums. While technically this can be done, it only makes sense in terms of rather unlikely threat model. It assumes an attacker who can coerce you into decrypting your data, but isn’t capable of determining that you gave them false data and retaliating upon that discovery. That seems like a very unlikely set of circumstances. (The one plausible scenario I’ve been able to come up with is for a child attempting to keep something hidden from parents who are not technically sophisticated.)

      Travel Mode might initially seem similar, but it is about a search of what is on your device. If the attacker only has the ability to compel decryption of what is on your device (as opposed to a more general power of being able to compel you to reveal all of your passwords) then it is possible to fully and honestly comply with the decryption of what is on your local device.

    • Thomas
      Thomas says:

      To Thomas (from Thomas):
      I’m afraid you have a valid point.
      It is very sad that law abiding people are punished instead of the terrorist nuts,

    • Tai Viinikka
      Tai Viinikka says:

      I think we should distinguish between crossing a border into Canada or the US and crossing a border into $Country-That-Tortures-People.
      The US and Canada give their border services people the constitutional power to search devices crossing the border. You have to comply with this, or they can hold you. They don’t have a broader power to demand every password for every purpose. So if you can honestly say, (and they cannot easily dispute in good faith) “I have given you access to everything that’s on my devices,” then you are good to go.

      IANAL, this is just my understanding as a Canadian who travels.

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      You are absolutely correct, Tai, individuals need to consider the various threats they face given the environments they will be entering. As I have said in a different comment, the US on its worst day may still be better in this regard than some other country on its best.

      I am, however, wary of advising people to “insist on their rights” in a border crossing situation. This is particularly true if you not a citizen of the country you are entering. Remember that there is an enormous power asymmetry as order authorities have broad powers to deny entry to anyone other than citizens. It is hard to fight for your rights in courts of a country that you have been denied entry into.

      I have had the misfortune of dealing extensively with immigration authorities in three countries, and I personally recommend that people be cooperative and never lie to these authorities. The idea of Travel Mode is so that you have less on your person when you cross a boarder. This should make it safer for you to be fully cooperative in a situation where the devices you carry with you are subject to search.

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      You make an important point, Oop.

      We are not trying to conceal the existence of data from anyone. After all, it is probably not a good idea to lie or mislead someone who has the power to make you unlock your device and apps on that device. And as you point out, we wouldn’t be able to succeed at that anyway.

      What we are trying to do is make it easy to remove certain data from your devices for situations where the device might be searched. There may be circumstances with someone has the power to search the devices you are carrying but does not have the power to search things not stored on your device.

      I hope this helps.
      Cheers,
      -j

  3. Polly
    Polly says:

    Rick – this is great on so many levels but as stupid as this sounds, I cannot see a way to mark a vault “safe for travel”. I see under My Profile how to turn it on, but I don’t a way to mark the vault.

    Reply
  4. Thomas Berrang
    Thomas Berrang says:

    Hi Rick!
    Great feature. Just in time for my next long business trip.
    Extremely easy question: I’m poking around my admin console and can’t find the place where I can assign a vault as ‘safe for travel’!

    Best regards
    Thomas

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Hi Thomas,

      We’re working on making that a little more obvious. The best way currently is to use the pencil (edit) button on the vault from your Home Screen. This will allow you change the vault’s name and includes a button to mark it safe for travel.

      Hope this helps!

      Rick

  5. Bill
    Bill says:

    This is an excellent, forward-thinking feature. But I can’t help but comment on how desperately sad it is that our privacy has come to this. The upside I guess is that this fuels creative solutions that will push technology forward like the decentralised web for one.

    Reply
  6. Pantulis
    Pantulis says:

    Regarding the centralized service vs standalone, it also means that if an attacker gains control of 1Password.com servers, it can also activate travel mode for me and disable my secret data on my device!

    I mean, the idea is cool and awesome and should be appraised, but there is no free lunch for everyone.

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      That’s a good point, Pantulis. Someone that gains access to Dropbox could perform a similar action by marking items in an AgileKeychain/OPVault as tombstoned (the step beyond trashed).

      Just like Dropbox, we have a large responsibility to keep our servers secure.

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      That is correct Pantulis.

      Travel Mode is about removing things from your local before you may be compelled to decrypt everything on that device. If the attackers are willing and capable of reaching beyond your device as well as compelling you to decrypt then there is nothing we can do.

      Law is very very unsettled in most places about searches and compulsion to decrypt, and I do not wish to make any claims about what any country’s laws are and their consequences, but I will point out that in some jurisdictions governments have more power to conduct searches at boarders then they might elsewhere. So not having the data with you at a border may be of value.

      We do not know how this will work out in practice, but I believe that the less information you have on your person as you cross a border the safer that information is. But for much of this we will have to wait and see.

      -j

  7. Louis
    Louis says:

    This is a really nice idea but I can see the obvious problem of being compelled to sign into your website.

    Could I suggest something else in addition?

    I enter my master psssword every 24 hours and use TouchID during that 24 hours.

    Under US law you can be compelled to use your fingerprint but not disclose a password (in most states).

    Therefore can you add a PIN protection option in addition to TouchID? It’s really simple programmatically and would tremendously increase my security.

    I don’t want to weaken my master password (and if your answer would be: disable TouchID, that’d be unacceptable).

    The flow for me would be:

    1) Master password every 24 hours
    2) TouchID
    3) Optional 4-6 digit PIN to unlock the vault

    This’d allow me to use TouchID to unlock the first level of security and then a PIN to get past the second level.

    If that’s not possible can you add the option to allow a PIN instead of TouchID?

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Hi Louis!

      I also turn off TouchID in situations where I would also be enabling Travel Mode. That is a good recommendation, but I also believe that you (and lots of other people) are mistaken when they say

      Under US law you can be compelled to use your fingerprint but not disclose a password (in most states).

      There may be a grain of truth to that; but it is not nearly as true as people suspect. While there may be protections against revealing your password, you can be compelled to use (but not reveal) a password in order to unlock something. And even the limited and barely apparent protections against revealing a password are very very far from settled law.

      I would also point out that what limited case law there is has to do with challenges to evidence introduced at a criminal trial. So even a well established precedent of the sort that you (and so many) believe exists, it may not play any role in what border officials may demand/request of people.

  8. Jon
    Jon says:

    While I don’t travel internationally much, this does appeal to me a great deal. It’s better to unlock a safe with SOME passwords in it (perhaps they could be dummy accounts for this purpose, who knows) than nothing at all.

    However I just have one big beg …. Linux edition. Please! So much please! Even mono/wine version would be fine. Being in DevOps my work machine is of the penguin variety and I probably have the most important secrets of all… but I can’t use 1password :-(

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      I hear ya. I want to setup a Linux machine these days and the lack of 1Password there is a real bummer. With 1Password.com I could use the webapp to get passwords to copy/paste, but that’s just not the same.

      Thanks for taking the time to comment. :)

      Rick

  9. Fred Hoysted
    Fred Hoysted says:

    I love the concept. About to give it a go, but one question first. I have a shared vault with my wife. I’ll be travelling and she’ll be staying at home, If I mark that vault as ‘not safe for travel’, presumably it is only removed from my devices, and not hers too? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Hi Fred,

      Thanks for the kind words. Your presumption is correct. It only removes the vaults from the devices of the people who are marked as traveling.

      Rick

  10. Matt
    Matt says:

    The fact that you have to add this feature is pretty depressing, which countries are asking for this level of privacy invasion? Just the US?
    Wouldn’t have crossed my mind to consider a boarder guard as a potential attacker.

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      I agree wholeheartedly. We’ve heard reports of overreach from a few countries, so it’s not just the US.

      Rick

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Hi Matt,

      Don’t read too much into the term “Travel” mode. That is the context in which discussion of this kind of thing has come up. Think about it as a mode to switch on prior to entering a situation where you may be compelled to decrypt the contents of the device you have on your person.

      At this point there are plenty of reports about such demands at US borders, but it isn’t even known if these have increased or whether it is only press reports of such incidents increasing. This is why the EFF is asking people to report such incidents to them. Although I suspect that there has been a real increase (along with an increase in press reporting).

      Also keep in mind that there are many countries that claim enormous powers to search people and their devices. The US on its worst day may still be a lot better than some other countries on their best day. It is up to you to decide when to use Travel Mode given your assessments of the risks that you face.

      -j

    • Tim
      Tim says:

      It’s absolutely not just the US. Pick a country, and google for the words “forced to unlock at border” + that country name.

      For example, it was easy for me to learn that Canada’s Border Services Agency is, for now, legally allowed to require you to unlock your electronic device, and hold on to it if you refuse.

  11. Tangible
    Tangible says:

    US law is unsettled. The ACLU says:

    “There’s no articulated CBP policy on whether agents may click on apps and search data stored in the cloud. While this kind of warrantless search should be well outside the government’s authority at the border, we don’t know how they view this issue.”

    One thing is certain: Lying to a CBP agent is a crime. If they see 1P on your device and ask if you have any vaults in travel mode, don’t lie.

    Reply
  12. David Gaw
    David Gaw says:

    It’s a clever idea, but how long before border authorities become aware of the feature, and order travelers to log in to 1Password and turn off Travel Mode, or be denied entry? I’m guessing not very.

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      That’s a very reasonable question. We’ll have to wait and see. We have some ideas for how this could be made better to help with this situation.

      Rick

    • Tangible
      Tangible says:

      David, note that US citizens cannot be denied entry by US officials. They can have their devices confiscated.

      Non-citizens can be denied entry.

    • Pat
      Pat says:

      TimeLock maybe? Like bank vaults, doesn’t matter if the password is known and correct. No password is verified until a specified time.

      So I am at the border, and the timelock is not released until 3 weeks from now….

      Additional request, “safe for border crossing” as separate from “safe for travel”

      Last question, how do you know the deleted vault is not recoverable? Maybe pollute the vault with bogus passwords?

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Thank you, Pat, for your excellent suggestions. Something like a time lock may very well make some sense.

      You are absolutely correct that there are different threats to your data when crossing a border than when traveling in general. But there are also different threats when traveling in location A than in location B (and C and D, …).
      Although it would be possible to have a bunch of fine grained settings for what vaults are “safe” for what settings, we have found in the past that offering such gradations tends to add more complexity and get people confused. (Many years ago, we experimented with “Security Levels”. Although it turned to be be helpful for some people, we dropped that because it did more harm than good.)

      I’m not saying that we won’t ever offer the kind of fine grained control you are asking about, but I did want to let you know that we try to limit complexity as much as possible.

      While it may sound cool to have decoy or bogus passwords, the value of such a feature depends on a very particular threat model. It assumes an attacker who is able to coerce you to decrypt your data but is unable to retaliate against you if you give them bogus data. Lying to or deliberately misleading someone who has the power to get your to decrypt your local data is probably not a very good idea. (Word games like “well you told me to decrypt my data and that is what I did” may play out nicely in our heads or in movie scripts, but are really unwise in real life.)

      -j

  13. Matt
    Matt says:

    From what I understand most of the legal right to search the device is just like their right to search your suitcase. They can argue that there are illegal or valuable items on your device that you need a permit/pay/can’t import thus they need to search it. Them requiring your device password is just like them requiring the key to your suitcase (in the suitcase situation they will typically cut it open if you don’t give the key)

    I think it would be hard to justify forcing you to log into a website this system where the mode is only usable on the website I think protects you in that from my understanding at least while the have the right to view all the content on your phone (including what you lock up in 1PW) they do not have the right to view content external to that device.

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      What’s legal will of course differ based on country. That being said, your understanding very closely matches my understanding of what’s typical.

      Rick

  14. Patrick Eddington
    Patrick Eddington says:

    If I understand correctly, in Travel Mode a user’s data remains resident on AgileBits servers in Canada. If U.S. DHS/CBP had a particular person targeted for a search and saw that said person had 1Password on their device, they could still go to CSIS and/or RCMP & ask them to serve you with a warrant for the user’s data, unless I’m mistaken–and if I am mistaken, please correct me.

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Hi Patrick,

      That’s an excellent question. We have a page that tries to go through that kind of scenario. You can find it here:
      https://1password.com/legal/law-enforcement/

      If you have any questions that aren’t answered here, please do let us know and we’ll make sure that you get your answer.

      Rick

  15. Dan Moutal
    Dan Moutal says:

    I did quick test and it did remove all vaults from my phone and my computer as intended. But there were a few issues when turning it back on. One minor issue on My mac was that once I turned travel mode off the default vault for saving was a dropbox vault instead my 1password.com vault as it had been before. This is a fairly minor issue though.

    More seriously the vaults haven’t come back on my phone. Travel mode is off but my 1password.com vaults haven’t come back. How long is this supposed to take? I have waited about 10 minutes, am I just being impatient?

    Still this looks like a very useful feature, much simpler that deleting all vaults before traveling

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Hi Dan,

      Thanks for the feedback. The “Vault for Saving” changing like that is something we’ll have to fix up. That’s a good point. Did it switch itself back to your Personal/Private vault after closing the preferences window and re-opening it? If not that smells like possibly 2 bugs.

      As for how long it should take on the phone… it should be instant like the Mac app. Are you using the iOS app itself or the iOS Extension? The Extension can’t sync so it’d just sit there. But the iOS app itself should sync after an unlock and the vaults should come back.

      Let us know and we’ll make sure to get the various bugs filed to fix things up.

      Rick

    • Dan Moutal
      Dan Moutal says:

      Did it switch itself back to your Personal/Private vault after closing the preferences window and re-opening it?

      Nope. Once I exited travel mode the only way to tell 1password to set the Vault for Saving back to my 1password.com vault was to set it manually.

      As for how long it should take on the phone… it should be instant like the Mac app. Are you using the iOS app itself or the iOS Extension?

      I am using the app, so something isn’t working right. I will give it some time to see what happens, otherwise I will try to sing out and then sign back in.

    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Thanks. I’ve filed a bug (OPM-5070) for us to look into the Vault for Saving issue.

      I am using the app, so something isn’t working right. I will give it some time to see what happens, otherwise I will try to sing out and then sign back in.

      Try locking the app and unlocking it. Or force quitting the app and re-launching it. You really shouldn’t need to sign out/sign in again. If none of those work I’d like to get a Diagnostics Report from the device so that we can see why it’s not talking to the server. Follow the instructions on here: https://support.1password.com/diagnostics/. Email it in and mention my name in the email along with a link to this blog comment to give us a bit of context. If there’s a bug I want us to fix it instead of finding a workaround.

      Rick

    • Dan Moutal
      Dan Moutal says:

      I did try force quitting and locking/unlocking as well as rebooting the phone. Nothing seemed to work. Although at some point during the afternoon, my vaults just showed up. I wonder if it could be the wifi network I was on (the work network) I will try again tomorrow when I am at work to see if it makes a difference

    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Network outages can definitely play a role, Dan. 1Password on your phone needs to get the message that certain vaults are “now” available.

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