Introducing Travel Mode: Protect your data when crossing borders

We often get inspired to create new features based on feedback from our customers. Earlier this month, our friends at Basecamp made their Employee Handbook public. We were impressed to see they had a whole section about using 1Password, which included instructions for keeping work information off their devices when travelling internationally.

We knew right away that we wanted to make it easier for everyone to follow this great advice. So we hunkered down and built Travel Mode.

Travel Mode is a new feature we’re making available to everyone with a 1Password membership. It protects your 1Password data from unwarranted searches when you travel. When you turn on Travel Mode, every vault will be removed from your devices except for the ones marked “safe for travel.” All it takes is a single click to travel with confidence.

It’s important for me that my personal data be as secure and private as possible. I have data on my devices that’s ultimately a lot more sensitive than my personal data though. As one of the developers here at AgileBits I’m trusted with access to certain keys and services that we simply can’t take any risks with.

How it works

Let’s say I had an upcoming trip for a technology conference in San Jose. I hear the apples are especially delicious over there this time of year. :) Before Travel Mode, I would have had to sign out of all my 1Password accounts on all my devices. If I needed certain passwords with me, I had to create a temporary travel account. It was a lot of work and not worth it for most people.

Now all I have to do is make sure any of the items I need for travel are in a single vault. I then sign in to my account on 1Password.com, mark that vault as “safe for travel,” and turn on Travel Mode in my profile. I unlock 1Password on my devices so the vaults are removed, and I’m now ready for my trip. Off I go from sunny Winnipeg to hopefully-sunnier San Jose, ready to cross the border knowing that my iPhone and my Mac no longer contain the vast majority of my sensitive information.

After I arrive at my destination, I can sign in again and turn off Travel Mode. The vaults immediately show up on my devices, and I’m back in business.

Not just a magic trick

Your vaults aren’t just hidden; they’re completely removed from your devices as long as Travel Mode is on. That includes every item and all your encryption keys. There are no traces left for anyone to find. So even if you’re asked to unlock 1Password by someone at the border, there’s no way for them to tell that Travel Mode is even enabled.

In 1Password Teams, Travel Mode is even cooler. If you’re a team administrator, you have total control over which secrets your employees can travel with. You can turn Travel Mode on and off for your team members, so you can ensure that company information stays safe at all times.

Travel Mode is going to change how you use 1Password. It’s already changed the way we use it. When we gave a sneak peak to our friends at Basecamp, here’s what their founder, David Heinemeier Hansson, had to say:

International travel while maintaining your privacy (and dignity!) has become increasingly tough. We need better tools to help protect ourselves against unwarranted searches and the leakage of business and personal secrets. 1Password is taking a great step in that direction with their new Travel Mode. Bravo.

Travel Mode is available today, included in every 1Password membership. Give it a shot, and let us know how you travel with 1Password.

Learn how to use Travel Mode on our support site.

119 replies
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  1. Chris
    Chris says:

    Interesting my first thought in these type of things is always the weakest link. So in this case if there is a way for me to re-enable my 1Password while traveling, there will be a way for the border agents as well.

    So in this case, if I can re-enable via 1Password.com, they could theoretically force me to login to that site just as easily as they could force me to login to the 1Password app. For a company specific feature, it could work where only the company the person works for, could re-enable to remotely when deemed safe.

    As for regular people, I would think it would make far more sense to simply delete the app a few minutes before approaching border control. Then there is no record that you have the app, thus they can’t compel you to login to the app or the website (though you would have to make sure you don’t have any emails such as newsletters etc, from 1Password in your mobile email, or any visits to 1password in your browser history.

    Then once you get through security you would reinstall the app and re download the vault. Rather than going to into 1pass.com to remove a vault prior to border and then 1pass.com to redownload vault after crossing.

    Reply
    • Jacob
      Jacob says:

      Hey Chris,

      Thanks for sharing, mate! Indeed, there are a few ways to approach this kind of thing. Travel Mode is the best one we could think of where the 1Password app can help you out a bit. Reinstalling the app is a system-level solution, and Travel Mode is one built-in to 1Password. It’s okay if it doesn’t fit every use case — as Rick has mentioned a few times in the comments here, you don’t have to use it if you prefer not to. You can reinstall the app instead, or simply sign out of your account in the app and sign back in when you’re past the border.

      If you have some suggestions for making this better for folks who aren’t members of a team, feel free to post them. It’s a new feature, so there’s plenty of room to improve it. 🙂

    • Patrick Eddington
      Patrick Eddington says:

      It’s a shame that companies like AgileBits are being forced to develop these kinds of capabilities. For American users of 1Password, let me suggest that you call your House member (202-224-3121 is the Capitol switchboard) & demand that they sign onto the Wyden/Paul/Polis/Farenthold bill to require probable cause-based warrants to search any US Person’s electronic device: https://www.wyden.senate.gov/news/press-releases/wyden-paul-polis-and-farenthold-bill-requires-warrants-to-search-americans-digital-devices-at-the-border

    • Jacob
      Jacob says:

      Hey Patrick,

      As an American here at AgileBits, I can certainly relate. Thanks for caring! I hope there’s more interest in that as well.

  2. Larry Nolan
    Larry Nolan says:

    Thanks for adding this, even though hidden until you edit the vault info. (suggestion: have the switch below the pencil)

    Have three international trips 2017-2018 and really not sure I have the fortitude to refuse to unlock my phone to CBP in USA on my 4th Amendment protection. This feature as well as turning off iCloud before going to CBP upon return gives me a way to maintain my information privacy for photos, data in the vaults, emails, files, contacts, etc.

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Hi Larry,

      There is no shame nor lack of “fortitude” in cooperating with authorities that have the ability to make things difficult for you. Also keep in mind that for the US, the extent to which the border is a “4th Amendment-free zone” is disputed. But the idea of Travel Mode is that you can easily manage what is not on your device before you enter a situation where it may be searched. That is, it should make it easier for you to cooperate with such a search.

      It sounds like you are a US citizen, and so you do have more rights than many others entering the US. Likewise there may be countries you enter where you have less rights than citizens of those countries. But the less you carry with you as you cross a border, the better off you are if this is to be searched. That is what Travel Mode is all about: Carrying less with you at certain times.

      -j

  3. Garz
    Garz says:

    Thank you for this great idea. As Chris mentioned it before, if I am in a country where they can force me (legally or not) to disclose my Master password/Secret key, they can force me to log in to https://my.1password.com, disable Travel Mode and download the vault on the device (previously unlocked by using coercion)…
    This defeats the whole purpose of the feature doesn’t it ? Like with hidden volumes in TrueCrypt/VeraCrypt, the only safe way would be to use a secondary password/key that would activate only the “safe for travel” vaults, both online and on the devices… But that would require major changes in the cryptography “under the hood” I guess…

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      You are correct Garz that Travel Mode does not protect you against someone who can compel you to turn off Travel Mode.

      But we introduced this under the assumption that there are (enough) circumstances in which only the things you are carrying with you are subject to search. Many governments, the US included, take the view that they have the authority to conduct searches of people (and shipments) at borders that they may not be able to conduct elsewhere.

      For example: I am a US citizen and so enjoy some protections against searches of my belongings in many circumstances. But a customs official is free to search my suitcase as I enter the country without any sort of warrant or probable cause.

      -j

  4. Brandon Yap
    Brandon Yap says:

    Want “travel mode” and don’t have a 1password.com membership? Just delete the app from your phone. And reinstall it when you get to your destination. A few more steps but not all that more difficult :)

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Yep Brandon,

      That is, indeed, what I sometimes did in the old days. Or at least thought about doing but rarely did as it was a bit of a PITA.

      (As I’ve said in other comments, while the threat of searches at certain borders may well of gone up, it isn’t isn’t a new problem.)

  5. Riccardo Sandrelli
    Riccardo Sandrelli says:

    Why not call it ‘cloak vault or cloak mode’. It may clear some confusion. I don’t use 1P but I like the concept.

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      That is a really good question, Riccardo, and it touches about a subtle point.

      The goal isn’t to conceal the existence of some data. If your Facebook password is in a vault that is marked Not Safe for Travel, we assume that the attacker still knows (or can learn) that you have a Facebook account. After all, it is not a good idea to lie to people who are in a position to get you to unlock your device. Instead, the goal is to not have the data on the device that may be subject to search.

      “Cloak” suggests that we are trying to pretend that the data doesn’t exist at all. Instead we just want the data to not be on the device.

      -j

  6. Paul Quinn
    Paul Quinn says:

    I just want to be clear on one thing and then ask the obvious question….

    The travel mode can only be turned on and off on the web? It is not accessible on the phone. Correct?

    When will an Android version become available? I only see iOS.

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Yes, Paul. You can only turn on or off Travel Mode when using the 1Password web-client.

      Once you turn it on, the you should see its effects on all clients, including in 1Password for Android. Is that not working for you?

      Cheers,
      -j

    • Will Moore
      Will Moore says:

      Thanks! we are really proud of the feature and know it is going to be of great help to lots of people, us included!

  7. Steffi
    Steffi says:

    This sounds great! Thanks to comments I was able to understand how it works. You should compile the comments of this post into a Q&A section! It really helps!

    Reply
    • Will Moore
      Will Moore says:

      Glad you like the feature! We think it is awesome!

      Comment conversations can be really helpful for finding out more about something, that’s why we love to answer your questions! We also have a great support site that lists more in-depth guides on our features, including Travel mode!

      You can find the article that relates to this feature here:

      https://support.1password.com/travel-mode/

      Thanks for commenting!

  8. Louis
    Louis says:

    Jeffrey,

    You said:

    “I also turn off TouchID in situations where I would also be enabling Travel Mode. That is a good recommendation…”

    But that’s not what I’m asking for. I’m suggesting that you give users the option to use a PIN instead of TouchID (the caveat being that they’ve already used their master password to sign-in within the relevant timeframe).

    1Password suggest users use strong master passwords but then you don’t give users an option to use a short PIN to unlock their vault on subsequent occasions. That will cause users to weaken their security and reduce the strength of their master password if they want to use a password instead of TouchID.

    Why can’t/won’t 1Password allow users to use a PIN in the scenario I described?

    By not doing so you’re forcing users to use a technology (TouchID) that they may not want to or you’re forcing them to enter their master password each time.

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Thank you for your correction, Louis. I’m sorry for misreading your comment the first time through.

      On Android we do offer a choice of PIN or fingerprint unlock. Historically this is because we couldn’t offer sufficiently secure fingerprint unlock on many Android devices, while iOS had the security properties we needed for TouchID. Indeed, when we first introduced TouchID unlock for 1Password on iOS we ran it along side an option for a quick unlock with PIN.

      I don’t recall when we removed the PIN option, leaving only TouchID, but it is part of an effort to keep options simple.

      There is a bit of a myth going around that you can be compelled to unlock with your fingerprint but can’t be compelled to unlock with a password/PIN. There is a grain of truth to that myth, but it is only a grain. The case law is extremely unsettled, and the theory depends on the assumption that one is being compelled to reveal the password/PIN. But one might merely be compelled to use the password/PIN to unlock instead of actually reveal it.

      Cheers,
      -j

  9. Tangible
    Tangible says:

    A suggestion: When travel mode is on, the app responds only to a “travel mode master password”, not to the actual master password. The website continues to require the regular master password.

    Rationale: CBP can ask for all passwords needed to view data on the device you’re carrying. By giving them the TMMP you can fully and honestly comply without giving them the ability to log in to your online account, where they could look into the nsft vaults or turn off travel mode.

    Alternative: You could allow the app while in travel mode to respond to either the tmmp or the regular master password. I like this less because it could be said to be a way to evade the law.

    Reply
    • Will Moore
      Will Moore says:

      Hi Tangible!

      Thanks for the comment. You aren’t the first person to mention this one! We’ve talked (internally) about the concept of a duress/ travel password a few times. It’s an interesting idea, but there are concerns there as well.

      Certainly one to bear in mind for the future :)

  10. Bob
    Bob says:

    OK, say you don’t want someone to know your facebook password. You exclude it from the vault, and like most of my 1password passwords I (truly) don’t know what the password is. The agent asks me to login to facebook. I can’t honestly say I don’t have an account, but I can honestly say I don’t know the password. What happens? In other words, is Travel Mode really going to help you in this case or can they make you try to do a password reset via email?

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Hi Bob,

      It’s difficult to say what would happen. We don’t know and anyone who claims that they do know probably doesn’t actually. The world is a changing place. What would be unheard of at one place could be common place at another.

      You’re right that they could (theoretically) force a password reset. If you have access to the email address associated with the facebook account you would have what you need to get into the account. I’ve not heard of any reports of anyone being forced to do something like that, and I really hope that it wouldn’t happen.

      Rick

  11. Peter Flynn
    Peter Flynn says:

    I don’t get this. All the border security has to do is pull out your fingernails (fig or lit, depending on country) until you cough up your password and turn Travel Mode off for them. Or can you make 1P’s existence completely invisible?

    Reply
    • Rick Fillion
      Rick Fillion says:

      Hi Peter,

      If you wanted to make 1Password’s existence completely invisible you could simply delete the app off of your devices. And in some scenarios that’s what people have been doing. Everything that Travel Mode enables has been possible to do in other ways, but with more work.

      Rick

  12. Tangible
    Tangible says:

    “All the border security has to do is pull out your fingernails (fig or lit, depending on country) until you cough up your password…”

    I think the goal here is to work within the law when confronting authorities who are also working within the law. The current challenge is that US authorities appear to be taking a very aggressive tack since last November, empowered by our xenophobic president. They are turning away non-US persons who refuse to give up passwords, and confiscating devices from US persons for days or weeks. Travel Mode is a reasonable way to allow users to disclose their passwords without compromising their most sensitive data. It’s not for the cyanide hollow tooth crowd.

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Thank you Tangible.

      Yes, I see this as making it easier to cooperate with a search. I have a password that allows me to do various things on this blog, including seeing the email and IP addresses of those commenting (this is for anti-spam reasons). For your privacy I would have to change that password (among others) if it was compromised. By putting those sorts of Logins into vaults that are not safe for travel, I can be much more comfortable cooperating with a search of my device than I would otherwise.

      There are passwords that I have a responsibility to not expose, not even to government officials unless I absolutely must. If I keep those off of the devices that I carry through the border, I do not have to worry so much about them being swept up in a search of my things at the border.

  13. Me
    Me says:

    Surely a time delay lock would be much more effective?

    Why not just lock the account’s non-safe codes until time XXX, which is specified in advance? You can set this for either the duration of your trip, or the time of border crossing + the maximum time you expect to be held up at the border?

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Hi,

      There is a certain appeal to a time delay, and I am not ruling it out. But we are focusing on the situation where it is only what is on your person that can be searched. Trying to defend against an attacker who can compel you to log into and administer the service itself is a fundamentally more difficult thing.

      I am just speculating, but in a situation where you would be compelled to turn off Travel Mode (instead of just compelled to have the devices you have with you searched) then a time delay would at best just increase the time you are detained.

    • Jacob
      Jacob says:

      Hey there!

      You can certainly use Travel Mode if you have a 1Password account. If you don’t have one, you can sign up and move your data over to one in just a few minutes, then use Travel Mode whenever you need to in the future. 🙂 And if you bought 1Password recently, send us a message — we’d be more than happy to get you some credit toward a 1Password account. Hope this helps!

  14. Arthur Thompson
    Arthur Thompson says:

    I may be missing something here (I don’t currently use 1password) but does the user have to remove all apps that use those passwords from my device?

    It would be suspicious that I have GMail or Snapchat or FB Messenger etc. installed on my device but I don’t have a login for them? Why are they installed would be a reasonable custom officer question IMO. What am I missing?

    Reply
    • Jacob
      Jacob says:

      Hey Arthur!

      You can still keep your apps, including 1Password, on your phone when Travel Mode is enabled. There’s no need to remove any of them. If I understand correctly, you’re wondering if it’d be suspicious to have the apps but not the password to them, since that’s stored in 1Password. If that’s the case, I agree it can be a bit odd, but if you don’t have it, then you can simply say you don’t have it and leave it at that. I can’t say what the border officer might say since I’m not one myself, so this is something you’d have to decide at your discretion.

  15. DonS
    DonS says:

    Thank you for your efforts to defend law-abiding citizens against border searches. So many comments here, I don’t know if this has been asked. Can you tell me more about your cloud service security? I assume if one is a “Person of Interest”, for whatever reason (even in error) a secret FISA warrant might compel your company to open your servers for general search. (Ghastly, I know, but it has happened to all the major clouds, AFAIK.) Can individual accounts be identified on your servers? Do you have the ability to decrypt data if required? I know this goes way beyond the intended purpose of Travel Mode, but thanks if you could posit an answer. :)

    Reply
    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      That’s a great question, Don! We only have your fully encrypted vault stored on our servers and we do not have the keys to decrypt it — namely, your Master Password and Secret Key. Jeff Goldberg, one of our security gurus, wrote a recent post about encryption keys and how 1Password manages those keys to help keep your data safe. We’ve also published an article in our knowledge base giving a general overview of our security model. If you’re interested in reading more about the technical details, you can check out our Security Design White Paper (PDF) as well. We know our customers are trusting us with important data and we take that responsibility seriously. As Jeff mentions in the post I linked above, we go to great lengths to be open about our security design, processes and decisions so that you can feel comfortable that your data is safe in your 1Password account.

      As for the erosion of data privacy and how 1Password would react to something like a FISA warrant, I’ll just direct you to a blog post Dave Teare, one of our founders and the heart and soul of AgileBits, wrote about a formal debate in Canada concerning data privacy late last year. These laws are always changing and while we’re committed to complying with our legal obligations, I think Dave’s post clearly shows how we feel about these laws and that we are committed to supporting data privacy in whatever ways we can. Travel Mode was born of that commitment to privacy and I hope we’ll continue to be an ally to our customers as these laws continue to evolve.

  16. Craig
    Craig says:

    This sounds like a great idea. However, I do have a concern about the ability of 1password.com to be able to ‘remote wipe’ the data on my devices.
    Knowing that US law enforcement will very quickly know about such features, is it remotely feasible that they may issue a warrant to AgileBits forcing them to enable ‘travel mode’ for an account? This would then cause a user’s information to be lost — on all their devices!

    So, I suppose heart of the question is: is the ability to enable ‘travel mode’ completely out of AgileBit’s hands (just like all the other aspects of 1password seems to be)? This would be a large security concern for me, if it weren’t.

    Reply
    • Jeffrey Goldberg
      Jeffrey Goldberg says:

      Hi Craig! That is an interesting point.

      With or without travel mode, it is very hard to defend against forced destruction of data. You are assuming an attacker who can compel us to manipulate our database. We can (and have) designed things so that under such compulsion we cannot decrypt the data, nor can we tamper with it (to make it decrypt to some other values), nor can we create false data that you would not be able to detect as false.

      But the technology itself does not prevent the forced destruction of data. Note that your local copies of your data will be included in your backups of your system. Depending on the nature of your backups can may be able to restore local copies to whatever point in time for which you have such a backup.

      This really isn’t a special “remote wipe” built for the purpose. We are leveraging some of the same tools that are used when someone is removed from a vault, and normal space saving behavior of the clients. Indeed, we were able to implement Travel Mode through server-only changes.

    • Craig
      Craig says:

      Thanks Jeffery!
      I completely forgot that the app is taking regular backups. Thanks for your patience :-)

  17. Tangible
    Tangible says:

    “Knowing that US law enforcement will very quickly know about such features, is it remotely feasible that they may issue a warrant to AgileBits forcing them to enable ‘travel mode’ for an account? This would then cause a user’s information to be lost — on all their devices!”

    I think it’s important to consider how a tool for security and privacy differs from one that abets criminals and terrorists. In the envisioned scenario the government isn’t just snooping around, it’s targeting a specific person or group very aggressively. Depending on circumstances, it’s quite likely most of us would be cheering them on.

    I’ve seen no evidence that our new Administration is going to be an exemplar of respect for our rights (except for those in the Second Amendment). We’re right to do what we can to protect the privacy of our data, but we need to guard against sliding into a “black helicopter” mentality.

    Reply
    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      We’re right to do what we can to protect the privacy of our data, but we need to guard against sliding into a “black helicopter” mentality.

      I love that you brought this up, Tangible. I’m going to do my best to stay out of the politics, but you’re right that Travel Mode is a tool to help ensure your privacy and security. It’s a tool to help you make choices about your own data privacy when traveling as well as a tool to help you feel comfortable cooperating with law enforcement. We can debate all we’d like about how governments handle security, both at borders and at home, but we would all benefit from recognizing that personal privacy and security do not need to be at odds with cooperating with law enforcement. If Travel Mode contributes to a dialogue about how our rights and our national security can be protected at the same time, I’ll be a happy camper. :)

    • Craig
      Craig says:

      I asked this question, not to promote dark aspects of our society, but more due to political purposes. It does not take a large stretch of the imagination to see that political maneuvering quickly oversteps bounds of moral legality into outright totalitarianism. Such has always happened in the past, and will always happen in the future.

      It has been clearly shown that what a Government sees as illegal, many in society do not. If I may cite Laura Poitras as a living example of ‘anti terrorist’ laws gone awry. She is regularly stopped at the US border, interrogated and detained: https://theintercept.com/2015/07/13/laura-poitras-sues-u-s-government-find-repeatedly-stopped-border/

      Note, I am not asking this for myself. But when I read this post, I saw the potential for abuse, because I see governments, ‘legal’ council and their agencies overstepping their bounds all of the time. Giving a government a ‘backdoor’ to control the citizens is not wise.

      Of course I am not against the police taking corrective actions for things that are legitimately reprehensible (and in many cases wish they would do more!), but increasingly the law is becoming grey, rather than black and white. It’s better to be safe, with regard to password security, rather than sorry IMHO.

    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      Hey Craig! As someone living in the Southern U.S., I feel ya on the bad government actors. This is an unsettled area of law and that always makes it tough to know where you stand. If I’m arrested, I know my (Miranda) rights. That’s pretty well settled. Sure, it’s still complicated, but I know if I repeat the word “lawyer” enough, I’ll eventually get one. Anything that involves technology tends to be a bit more hazy.

      I think a personal anecdote may be illustrative here. I worked at two different law firms before joining AgileBits. One thing I saw in every single law office I walked into while working for them is a fax machine. I’m 30, so I had never once seen a fax machine prior to these experiences. I had no idea how to use one and didn’t understand why we had them. Turns out, there were still courts that didn’t accept electronic filings in my state, so we often had to file things via fax or hand delivery years after the Internet has become ubiquitous.

      This serves to demonstrate just how slowly the legal field as a whole evolves. Technology moves really fast, so it’s no wonder the law doesn’t seem to keep up. Of course, we hope this area of law grows and matures rationally and that governments stop using the specter of terrorism as a means to scare their citizens into giving up their right to privacy, but until then, we hope Travel Mode helps. At least a bit. ❤️

  18. John Goold
    John Goold says:

    Interesting article. I’m a former 1Password user and was just checking back to see how 1Password has evolved.

    You referenced https://1password.com/legal/law-enforcement/ which I read. I think there is something in there that needs to be corrected. The article states that only requests in English can be accommodated. I believe that legally you also will have to accommodate requests in French.

    Again thanks for the discussion on Travel Mode — this is one of the better threads I’ve read (it’s a civilized discussion).

    Reply
    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      Hey John! IANA(Canadian)L, but knowing the bi-lingual nature of Canada, I can see your point. My best guess would be some choice of law rules would apply depending on the source of any given request and they’d need to be addressed on a case-by-case basis. Of course, this is quickly starting to smell like a sizable research project and, though the answer is likely in my big fat Conflicts of Law book from my second year of U.S. law school somewhere, I don’t have it at my fingertips. I’m starting to get flashbacks to finals that decided my entire grade for the semester and my foreseeable future, but I’ll pass along your thoughts to those more qualified than I and cross my fingers I can leave that big, fat book in a box in my closet where it belongs. :P

      And thank you for the Travel Mode love! Data privacy is an issue close to my heart and I’m delighted to be working for a company like AgileBits that seeks to protect it. I only hope we continue to be an ally to those seeking to protect their privacy rights as laws continue to evolve.

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