Why We Love 1Password Memberships

TL;DR: We love 1Password. We love you. We believe 1Password memberships are the best and will shout it from the mountaintops, but standalone vaults aren’t being removed.

Recently a customer wrote in to praise us for handling a sticky situation with a quick and decisive response. They signed off their post with “from a happy customer”.

Jeff, our resident Chief Defender Against the Dark Arts, replied and signed his message with “from a happy 1Password maker”.

This was really cute and I loved the play on words. It also got me thinking though: we really are happy 1Password makers.

From a happy 1Password maker

Jeff’s phrase is similar to a statement that I tell our team often and expound upon during interviews: we all need to be working at our dream jobs. So I really shouldn’t be surprised by Jeff’s signature. But it stuck with me as I adored its simplicity.

Quick and to the point. And at the same time, a revelation. I absolutely loved it.

1Password is what it is today because we all love working here and have fun helping our customers. We are completely self-funded, independent, have turned down all offers from venture capitalists, and our board of directors consists entirely of people who work on 1Password and help customers directly each and every day.

As a result we’re able to provide true security and never compromise on protecting the privacy of our customers. We don’t have to and never will sell your information or spam you with ads.

The bottom line is we have a complete focus on 1Password and since we’re working on stuff we love, we’re excited and have the desire to constantly improve and make 1Password the best it can be. We’re happy to be able to do this.

Happy 1Password memberships

How is happiness related to 1Password memberships? Simple. We created 1Password memberships to make 1Password the best it can be. And a direct result of 1Password memberships is happier 1Password makers and customers alike.

I am so much happier now that 1Password has the power of memberships to help me help our customers. With memberships, there are several things that I no longer need to do, and as a direct result I have more time to improve 1Password and help more customers.

With 1Password memberships we have a wonderful set of things we no longer need to do. I call it my No More list and here are just the highlights:


No More telling people who had syncing misconfigured (or didn’t realize that syncing needed to be manually configured) that I’m sorry they lost their data when they reset their phone. With 1Password memberships, all your data is synced automatically when you sign in, so there’s nothing to set up or worry about configuring wrong.

No More telling people that I’m sorry that when they deleted some files from their hard drive they didn’t recognize they inadvertently deleted all their 1Password data. With 1Password memberships, everyone enjoys data loss protection that ensures this can never happen.

No More explaining that we don’t have any control or visibility into third-party sync solutions and are therefore limited when troubleshooting problems. With 1Password memberships, we are in complete control of both sides of the connection so we’re able to optimize things, quickly troubleshoot, and improve immediately when a problem is found. All this results in a rock solid solution that results in an entire category of issues no longer affecting our customers.

No More explaining why purchasing 1Password on one platform doesn’t automatically unlock it on all other platforms. Not only is it really hard for customers to understand that 1Password is “licensed per person, per platform, with paid upgrades”, but it’s an incredible mouthful for us to even say. With 1Password memberships, you simply subscribe once and you get access to 1Password everywhere.

No More needing to hold back on features for creating a “big splash” for major upgrades. These require purchasing a license upgrade and so it’s important that we save up features (often for a year or more) so we can woo customers to open up their wallets. With 1Password memberships, we can give people new features as soon as they are available so they can enjoy them right away. See Travel Mode and 1Password for Slackers for examples of this.

I wish I could also say No More for explaining to people who have forgotten their Master Password that 1Password uses true security and they therefore need to start over. But with 1Password memberships I can at least share the good news that families and teams can use Account Recovery to restore their own access.

And with the time we save from not needing to do these things, we’ll be able to improve 1Password itself to make it easier for customers to remember their Master Passwords. So perhaps someday soon this will indeed end up on my No More list.

Nudging people towards 1Password memberships


Now of course not everyone is on 1Password memberships yet, so we do indeed still work through these issues every day. So it’s not truly a No More list. At least not yet. Still, the number of people on memberships continues to grow every day, so we’re quickly seeing more and more of these bright spots as we move throughout our day.

All these bright spots add up to an even happier set of 1Password makers. And that’s as important for you as it is for us, because the happier a 1Password maker is, the better they’ll be able to widen the smiles of 1Password customers everywhere. Nothing great was ever created without passion, and this is just as true for designing and developing software as it is for customer support. I’m really excited about this and hope that someday 100% of our customers will embrace 1Password memberships.

Now the thing is, I know it’s not realistic to expect everyone to be able to be able to join one of our memberships at this time. As great as 1Password memberships are, I know that our excitement for them can cause some people to become worried. After all, many have corporate policies or regional restrictions that prevent them from using a hosted solution like ours, and so they’re understandably concerned and want to know that there’s a future for them with 1Password.

These worries are compounded by the fact that 1Password 6 for Windows was designed from the ground up to support 1Password Teams customers only (and then later expanded to include family and individual plans), and we are unsure how this adventure will play out on the Windows side of the world, so we haven’t made any public announcements about when support for standalone vaults will be added, if ever. Many Mac users worry that the same fate awaits 1Password 6 for Mac, and that we will remove support for local vaults and force them to pay again.

This isn’t going to happen. First, it would be evil to take away something you’ve already paid for. And evil doesn’t make for a Happy 1Password Customer, which is the cornerstone for a Happy 1Password Maker. It’s simply not who we are.

For those who purchased 1Password 6 for Mac already, you’re perfectly fine the way you are and can continue rocking 1Password the way you have been. There’s no requirement to change anything as we will not be removing features or forcing you to subscribe. In fact we’re still selling licenses of 1Password 6 for Mac for those that really need them (you can find them today on the setup screen under More Options).

And you need not worry about 1Password 7 for Mac, either, as it will continue to support standalone vaults just like version 6 does today.

We know that not everyone is ready to make the jump yet, and as such, we will continue to support customers who are managing their own standalone vaults. 1Password 6 and even 1Password 7 will continue to support standalone vaults. But 1Password memberships are indeed awesome and are the best way to use 1Password, and as such, I am going to continue to nudge you over when ever I can 🙂

Love Dave,
A Happy 1Password Maker ❤️ 🇨🇦

P. S. Please don’t think our excitement for memberships has anything to do with money. We’re completely self-funded so we don’t have any investors forcing us to make changes by looking solely at our bottom line. We were doing just fine selling individual licenses and AgileBits was already steadily growing before 1Password Teams was even introduced. We created 1Password Memberships because we had a vision for how 1Password could be even better and we followed our dreams. The result has been stupendously awesome and better than our wildest dreams! Today, over 95% of our revenues are coming from subscribers, which is truly mind blowing. Many investment strategists would say it makes sense to simply drop support for everything else and focus on the money. That’s not how we do things around here. We focus on people, love, and happiness. It’s the way we do things and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

P. P. S. You can create a 1Password membership and move all your existing data over today in just a few minutes. Learn more here. Like I said, I’m going to continue to non-apologetically nudge you over whenever I can 😉

287 replies
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  1. John
    John says:

    Hi,

    Where do I find the link to the store to buy the standalone version for macOS? You seemed to have removed all mention of it from your website. I’ve been saving up for a while to buy it, but can’t find it on your site now.

    I’ve also found the following quote on the support forums, which contradicts what Dave has said in this blog post.

    AgileBits Accepted Answer: 2017-05-31 — 1Password is no longer marketed as a standalone product. We strongly feel that our 1Password memberships provide a much better experience. If you would like to discuss your particular situation, and what solution may work best for you, please feel free to email us at sales@agilebits.com.
    Source: https://discussions.agilebits.com/discussion/76956/can-i-still-buy-standalone-license-for-the-1password

    I have no problem with you guys preferring the subscription to the standalone version and pushing new customers that way, but if you say you’re going to support both versions, do just that, support both. A good start would be to not hide the standalone version on your website.

    I have no issue with your subscription model, but I’m a student and I just can’t afford a recurring monthly payment. I do have an issue with you guys saying you support both versions, but removing all mentions of the version you don’t want people to buy from your website.

    John

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Hi John! 👋🏻

      Thanks for reaching out and sharing your concerns with me. You’re right, we no long mention standalone vaults and licenses directly on our website. For well over a year our website presented both 1Password memberships and standalone licenses side-by-side on the website and it confused the vast majority of new customers. Our support inbox started to overflow with customer questions and many potential customers simply left without ever contacting us.

      As we worked through various designs that supported both options we realized that the vast majority of people who download 1Password simply want to protect themselves and move on with their lives. They trust us to choose the best default option for most people and aren’t interested in the fine details between two secure storage options.

      We therefore choose what we strongly believe to be the best option for the vast majority of people and rolled with it across the website. We were able to do this on the website but the apps themselves didn’t have this luxury. For the reasons outlined in this post we needed to find a way to support both models within the apps themselves.

      Once 1Password is configured on a device, it’s pretty easy for us to know what needs to be done as the user has already told us what they wanted. On the setup screens, however, the user hasn’t made a choice yet and we run the risk of being right back where were were with the website – it’s very easy to confuse new users, and quite frankly, it’s really easy to confuse existing users as well if we don’t make the standalone vault options easy to find.

      These setup screens were by far our hardest design challenge and you can see the earlier comment by Michael Fey for some details about some of the struggles we had there.

      Long story short, on the setup screen the very first button is targeted at new users and since we believe strongly that 1Password memberships are the best way to use 1Password, this prominent button takes new users down that path. We then highlight ways that existing users can find their data, including Dropbox and iCloud. Then we placed the creation of new standalone vaults as well as WLAN Sync underneath the More Options button. This button is on the setup screen itself and we’ve found this balance to be quite reasonable as we’re not forcing you to jump through too many hoops while at the same time we’re saving most new users from finding it accidentally. To be clear, users still do find this option when they don’t mean to use it, but overall the balance is pretty good overall I’d say.

      So long story short, click More Options when setting up your Mac or iOS device and you’ll see a Create Local Vault option and you can proceed from there.

      I hope that helps. Take care and best of luck at school this year!

      ++dave;

    • John
      John says:

      Thanks for the responses, Brenty and Dave. The bit at the end of Dave’s reply cleared things up for me.

      Maybe you should add that explanation to your website, if not on the main site, at least in the support section. I searched on the support site and couldn’t find any information about it. Just a suggestion.

      Fair point about the subscription being cheaper in some ways, but I plan on using 1password for a few years at least and like I said, I’m just a poor student with a lot of student loans, so the standalone version will work out cheaper for me in the long run. I should be able to make do with the free version of the mobile app for now too.

      Just some food for thought for you guys. I know the subscription model is great for you guys and I’m sure it’s quite profitable, but please spare a thought for the little guys, like students, in your future plans. Adding another subscription expense to already very expensive student loans doesn’t really work out for a lot of us. I have a lot of friends who have Windows PC’s and want to use 1password but can’t afford it because that version is only subscription based.

      Anyway, thanks for the help and I hope that I’ll be able to support you in the future when I can afford to get the best, fully unlocked versions of 1password for each of my devices.

      John

  2. Jeffrey Alles
    Jeffrey Alles says:

    “Every day we must choose between what is easy, and what is right.” — Dave Teare.

    That’s one of the Slack loading messages we have here at AgileBits. Every time I see that, I’m reminded of how much we really strive to do right by our customers, and it’s inspiring to be empowered to do the right thing, to be challenged and asked every day to make the best Happy 1Password Experience we can.

    I’ve been using 1Password since January 2009, so I just passed my eight anniversary of Happy Password Management. I originally used KeePass because I saw how secure it was, but then I started using a Mac and 1Password improved on that kind of security with the ease of use I missed. (KeePass lovers, don’t get me wrong, it’s still a wonderful application!)

    I started at AgileBits in January of this year, and until February I was using a local OPVault synced through Dropbox. When 1Password memberships (nee Accounts) first launched, I was so excited because my initial reaction was “AgileBits can stay in business!” Let’s face it, it’s definitely a challenge to develop rock solid, well regarded software with millions of users when you only get one payment per version from each user. I was excited because while I didn’t think the membership was right for me, I could now “pay AgileBits back” for all those free upgrades.

    You see, I had been using OPVault even while paying for a 1Password membership because I liked the idea of continuing to support the company that builds one of the most important apps in my life. Yet I didn’t want to trust them with my data. It wasn’t that I didn’t think AgileBits could build a rock solid environment to store my data, but it was a new service and I just wasn’t ready.

    When I joined AgileBits just six short months ago, I got to see the inside of my favorite software development house, while holding tightly to my OPVault vaults. No one here is made to use one model over the other, and many of us are using a mix of the two. Some of us are still using only OPVault for non-AgileBits secrets. Being on the inside has some advantages that can be harder to communicate. For example, I have a role within our Security Team, and that gives me a lot of insight into how the service is built and safeguarded. Being of a systems administration and information security background, I help “connect the dots” for our larger customers, and explain what we do to keep users safe. This insight actually helped my confidence in the 1Password service. Every day I field security reviews from large companies that want to use 1Password memberships, and every time I get to check a ‘Yes’ box, I feel great!

    I get to witness first hand the deep, unwavering care and attention that goes into making 1Password not just a Happy Experience for our customers, but that goes into doing things the right way to keep our users safe in an all too often dangerous digital world. It was this insight that finally got me using my 1Password membership. I realized how much more secure it is than using Dropbox or iCloud sync because I got to see everything being made right in front of me. I got to take part in the debates and the conversations, see the infrastructure and design, and learn it more deeply.

    As I moved into my cobweb filled 1Password membership, I realized that all of those wonderful features “that I’m not missing” were actually incredibly useful. No longer did I have to keep a convoluted backup strategy to ensure the safety of my OPVaults (after all, my Dropbox credentials were in 1Password….). All I had to do was print an Emergency Kit. Or twelve.

    I used the chance to get my 1Password Families groove on and start getting my family and friends onboard with 1Password. I’d been meaning to do that for awhile but the complication of making sure they all had Dropbox accounts or sound backup strategies (that demonstrably worked) was a lot of work. I wasn’t confident of what would happen if they forgot their Master Passwords, or lost access to their Dropbox account and devices — I’ve dealt with many customers who have and it’s heart wrenching. Also, licenses get expensive, and I knew that several of my friends and family members didn’t want to go buy a $65 password manager. With 1Password Families, I no longer have any of those worries, I can give many people in my life 1Password for less than what I’d pay for a single license, and I have the same high confidence in rock solid end to end encryption and security that 1Password storage has always provided.

    Even as I enjoy my 1Password membership and sharing it with my friends and family, I still love OPVault too. It’s a solid format that has many benefits, and when we discuss OPVault and standalone, local sync inside AgileBits, it’s always with love and devotion. It’s not the best way for most people to use 1Password, but it’s a way many of you love, and we want to let you know that we honor that and respect it.

    We want to do right by every customer, and it’s so wonderful that, as Dave drives us to strive for, we’ve once again been able to do the right thing instead of the easy thing.

    Reply
  3. Rob Hanslip
    Rob Hanslip says:

    I’ve been with AgileBits for a few years now and it wasn’t until we released 1Password Families, when my wife and teenage daughter really jumped on the bandwagon with 1Password. Before then, my wife gave it a shot and was syncing via dropbox, then iCloud, then dropbox. Shortly after, she had no idea how or when she was syncing, had no patience and basically threw in the towel. Now with Families, all of her data is automatically syncing between her devices and she truly loves how easily we can share items between our whole family.

    Reply
  4. Lars Olsson
    Lars Olsson says:

    My first license for 1Password was dated 7/29/2007, and I had the same reaction a lot of you probably did when you first started using it: “holy COW, how did I ever live without this?” I dove in head first, learned about Master Passwords and AES encryption and PBKDF2 and all sorts of other minutiae of how this amazing new product I’d discovered kept its users safe…because I’m a geek; the kind of person who enjoys understanding how something works and what you can do with it.

    Fast forward a few years, and I began working here at AgileBits (I had a similar “holy cow” reaction to working here as well, but that’s a story for another time 🙂). This was in the days just before work began in earnest on the server architecture that became 1Password accounts. So I got to see the future being created, but at the same time my early work was in the standalone vault(s) ecosystem. On a day-to-day basis, I helped customers with sync troubleshooting issues and vault-sharing issues and out-of-date version issues and a whole host of other problems that simply don’t exist anymore for our users who have a 1Password membership.

    A lot of you may be familiar with this next bit: once your extended family gets word that you’re “a computer person,” you become default IT for your entire family. If you’ve spent late nights on the phone with a relative helping them figure out how to set up their Facebook account or configure the new router they bought after they changed ISPs, you feel me. But something happened after I invited my mother to my 1Password Families account: I still get calls from her about other issues she might be having with her technology, but she doesn’t call me about 1Password anymore.

    What that experience made me remember is that although I am the kind of person who likes to know what makes things tick – who enjoys getting into the weeds of configuring and setting tools up myself, most people simply are not wired this way. Most people just want the benefit of something that improves their life in some way without needing or wanting to know the inner workings. That’s why I love 1Password memberships: not because they make my life easier (though they definitely do, both at work and at home), but because I’m reminded constantly that the absence of all those problems related to vaults and syncing and sharing means 1Password memberships are making our users’ lives easier too — thousands of them, every month.

    Oh, and my mom’s as well. The son in me is happy knowing my mother is safer online because she can use 1Password easily and securely without having to manage (or call me to manage) her setup, and the security geek in me is happy knowing her private data is secure.

    Reply
  5. John
    John says:

    I guess my comment didn’t get approved because it was a bit negative as I see other comments approved after I sent mine, but I’ll try one more time…

    Hi,

    Where do I find the link to the store to buy the standalone version for macOS? You seemed to have removed all mention of it from your website. I’ve been saving up for a while to buy it, but can’t find it on your site now.

    I’ve also found the following quote on the support forums, which contradicts what Dave has said in this blog post.

    AgileBits Accepted Answer: 2017-05-31 — 1Password is no longer marketed as a standalone product. We strongly feel that our 1Password memberships provide a much better experience. If you would like to discuss your particular situation, and what solution may work best for you, please feel free to email us at sales@agilebits.com.
    Source: https://discussions.agilebits.com/discussion/76956/can-i-still-buy-standalone-license-for-the-1password

    I have no problem with you guys preferring the subscription to the standalone version and pushing new customers that way, but if you say you’re going to support both versions, do just that, support both. A good start would be to not hide the standalone version on your website.

    I have no issue with your subscription model, but I’m a student and I just can’t afford a recurring monthly payment. I do have an issue with you guys saying you support both versions, but removing all mentions of the version you don’t want people to buy from your website.

    John

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Hi John,

      I’m sorry for the delay in approving your comment. I have comment moderation enabled in WordPress and need to manually approve each comment. I like this as it gives me a chance to reply personally as I go through the approval process. I’m slower than I would like to be but overall this system works pretty well. My only complaint is when you reload the page, WordPress will not show you your comment since it’s still awaiting approval, so it makes it seem like your comment was deleted. I suspect that’s what happened to you.

      As for the website, we used to present 1Password accounts and standalone licenses side by side and it created a great deal of confusion. We had it this way for about a year before we decided to simply change things to focus on what most people care about, and that’s simply becoming secure. The vast majority of people who download 1Password simply want to protect themselves and move on with their lives.

      To answer your question about purchasing a license, you can do so on Mac and iOS by selecting the More Options button on the set up screen and then choosing Create Local Vault.

      I hope that helps.

      Take care,

      ++dave;

  6. Nick
    Nick says:

    All these claqueuresque posts here remind me of a meeting that Trump had recently with his cabinet members where everybody had to express their excitement and gratefulness about working for Trump. It was disgusting, and what you guys are doing here is disgusting, too.

    There is one single reason why any software company changes from selling their software to renting it: to make more money. It’s not love, it’s greed. Be a man, Dave Teare, and stand up to it.

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      I’m sorry you feel that way, Nick. And I feel sick to my stomach by the parallel you’re attempting to draw there. 😔

      Regarding the comments from my fellow bits, to be clear, these are here because I wanted my team to come here and share their personal feelings and experiences so that people could see for themselves that we are a diverse family with many various needs. I had hoped by showing our human side and that how we don’t all have the same needs or agree on everything people would show that the “subscription is a cash grab” argument that so many people throw at us is false. For the record, here’s the exact comment I posted to our internal Slack announcement channel about this:

      ++dave;

    • Tangible
      Tangible says:

      Nick, I had the exact same reaction reading the “voluntary” comments from the poor employees: OMG, this is an online version of the infamous Trump “How much do you love me?” Cabinet meeting.

      Dave, your motives may be good, but every employee knows that suggestions from the boss are orders, no matter how nicely they’re phrased. This just came across as creepy.

    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      I’m sorry you feel that way, Nick.

      At the end of the day all I can do is follow my heart and do what I think should be done. While I see how you might feel otherwise, I stand by my decision to ask my fellow bits to share their stories.

      With that said, I have the privilege of being a citizen of Canada with our amazing Prime Minister. If I was living in another country and had a leader doing crazy shit like you and Nick described, then I guess I might be hypersensitive towards anything that looked remotely like it. I’m very thankful I don’t have that problem.

      🙏✌️❤️🇨🇦

      ++dave;

  7. Eugene Suchkov
    Eugene Suchkov says:

    Guys, thank you for being open. I’m using 1Pass for 9 years and was a happy customer. Thank you for all those years delivering the product. You were delivering the product I’ve trusted.

    However last days showed I have to move on.

    You provided a beautiful explanation on the issue. However, what I’m seeing in all the “No more” section is “that’s easier for us”. Not for the customer. OK, maybe it’s easier for a non-technical customer but not for a techie.

    That feels like betrayal because we, as geeks advocated and promoted the product to the our less-geeky peers, friends, relatives.

    My major concern is your sync service. I trust you but there are always limits in this trust. I’m simply not comfortable by having my passwords not locally. I know claim it to be even more secure. But can we have it as is. Otherwise why should I recommend you over, let’s say (whatever)Pass – they have the same model and they are free to use?

    I also cannot trust you now in claiming that local vaults are not being removed even in 1Password7. It will happen to be removed in 8 or 9, and next OS X major release will be not compatible with the latest version that supports local vaults. This happened already once, 1Password 2 was not compatible with the Snow Leopard forcing people who upgraded to buy an upgrade license for 1Password 3. It’s a matter of time when the same thing happens to the windows version. This is basically holding hostages from my standpoint.

    And that’s not about the money, I’m eager to switch for the subscription model and pay every month for it. Just because I want you to have it, continue development and be a happy 1Password maker. But I need trust in the principal feature. A reasonable proof of trust like adding local vaults to the windows version.

    However, thank you for being awesome all those years

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Thank you so much for supporting us all these years, Eugene! I truly appreciate it and I know that we wouldn’t be here today without awesome customers like you. ❤️

      I’m sorry that my actions left you feeling betrayed. That’s all on me obviously and I apologize.

      Regarding 1Password 2 and it’s incompatibility with Snow Leopard, I think it was Tiger support that we dropped in that release if my memory serves me. In any event, for the record, we spent a great deal of effort ensuring that 1Password 3 synced properly with 1Password 2 so that we wouldn’t leave customers out in the cold. But indeed we continue to ratchet up the required OS versions in each 1Password release and we’ll continue to do so as Apple and Microsoft continue to add new goodies that we want to take advantage of. We do our best to ensure that every customer has a simple migration path. It’s not always perfect, but we do our best to make it as easy as possible for customers to move forward along with us.

      Anyway, I hear you loud and clear about 1Password 7 for Windows and your desire to hear me promise what you want me to promise. I simply cannot do that at this time. Please keep an eye on this blog as I’ll be sure to have more discussions on this subject in the future.

      Take care,

      ++dave;

  8. MAGIX
    MAGIX says:

    subscription is a no go for me, if it comes I quit 1Password und change to other password tools like Enpass.

    Regards from Germany

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Thanks for letting me know, MAGIX! I fully understand that subscriptions are not for everyone and I hear you loud and clear. I hope you’re enjoying your standalone vaults and continue to love 1Password!

      Take care,

      ++dave;

  9. Sebastian
    Sebastian says:

    So it took you 5 minutes to remove my comment as it seems. It seems everyone is allowed to post but me. I wasn’t being negative or rude!

    I love 1Password for what it is with my standalone licence! The browser integration is working great and I can sync directly from win to osx (without the cloud). And I would never ever think about storing my sensible data within the cloud, encrypted or not. This is my decision and I am happy you are respecting it!

    But it would be great if you would look after the Windows version of 1Password. Version 4 has gotten old and it doesn’t look and feel like the OS X one. Also some features don’t work properly like sections (they are only “visible” while editing). I know that several times it got stated by your staff that it is on your plan, but there is sadly no due.

    I hope I can continue to use 1Password standalone for a long time because for me it is working perfectly fine and in my very own opinion it is the best of all managers out there.

    Sincerely

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Hi Sebastian!

      I agree 100%! You were not being negative or rude! It’s simply a matter of timing 🙂

      I have comment moderation enabled here in WordPress as we get a ton of spam so I manually approve all comments. I like to reply to comments as I approve them, and while I’m slower than I would like to be, I’m happy with this process overall. After you post a comment you’ll see a message something like “Awaiting moderation” and then (unfortunately) if you reload the page the comment won’t appear because it’s not approved yet. It would be great if WordPress would remember that you were the one that posted it and showed it to you, along with the moderation message.

      Anyway, I’m very happy that you love 1Password! We love you, too! ❤️ Regarding Windows, I hear you and we’ll see what we can do. I specifically did not promise anything on the Windows side of the world specifically because there is a ton of work required there to support what you are asking for. I’ve mentioned it in a few other comments here and have some rather lengthy comments on articles here on this site but to sum it up quickly 1Password 6 for Windows was written from scratch to use the latest and greatest technologies from Microsoft. We focused our efforts exclusively on supporting 1Password Teams memberships. Our work isn’t done there yet and there’s a lot remaining to complete and as such I’ve asked the team to continue to their exclusive focus on memberships. I understand this isn’t what you want to hear and with any luck I’ll be able to tell you something different in the future. Until then I need our Windows team focused on their remaining tasks that we set out on years ago. It’s amazing how long software takes to develop and we all want it sooner, so I’m more sympathetic to your request than you might expect. 🙂

      Thanks again for sharing!

      Take care,

      ++dave;

  10. A.
    A. says:

    It is always nice to see Love expressed.

    Covered within all that love is the – finally! THANK YOU! – announcement that you will continue to support local vaults with the next version. I will still have to reflect upon whether in the light of the fact that you just do not see people ready y e t to switch to cloud storage and the very strong expression of your favouring saving the data in the cloud I should revise my decision to switch to another password safe – too dedicated you seemed to be to go push local vaults aside eagerly.

    In any case, what does that mean now?

    For Windows users, I do not see a stand alone version offered here. If you do offer it: Will it allow local vaults for windows 7 which are not forced to sync with the cloud?
    Will it be possible, once one decides to have data in the cloud, to reverse to local vaults and delete the data in the cloud?
    Will it be possible to have some data only in the local vault, and some in the cloud?
    Are your answers valid for all platform versions, or for which not?

    I would appreciate your clarification, and I think a lot of other readers of your blog, namely those who already gave up on you because of your hitherto hesitation to pledge support for local vaults for version 7, too. Actually, I only today installed the programme of a competitor – so it was very close…

    Looking forward to your reply…

    Reply
    • A.
      A. says:

      oh, and, just to clarify my question: If there is no stand-alone version for windows, would a subscription allow to have a local vault the data of which are not sent to the cloud, and would that allow to be exported to a Mac version, once I switch back to a Mac?

    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      Hello again, A! I decided I’d address the current state of all platforms here so that they’re all in one place. For Windows, you can still use standalone vaults if you have already purchased 1Password 4 for Windows and these can sync with 1Password 6 for Mac, iOS and Android. If you didn’t purchase a Windows license before, you can always contact us and we can see what we can do for you. 1Password 6 for Windows doesn’t currently support standalone vaults at all and 1Password 4 for Windows doesn’t support 1Password memberships, so you could not use a standalone vault on Windows with a 1Password membership, but 1Password memberships themselves are not at odds with standalone vaults. In fact, I have a standalone vault alongside my 1Password account on my Mac and my Android phone and I’ve never had a standalone license for any platform except Windows. Offering the option to use standalone vaults with a 1Password membership (if we ever do switch to a membership-only model) is something some customers have recommended to us and it’s certainly something to consider, but that’s a decision for another day since we have no immediate plans to stop selling standalone licenses.

      As for exporting, no matter how you use 1Password, you can always export your data from any of the 1Password apps, even if you have a frozen 1Password account. That said, exporting and syncing are two different things and since syncing is the preferred method for transferring data between different 1Password apps, exports aren’t really the best choice for switching from Windows to Mac. No matter what version of 1Password you’re using where, however, we can almost always find a way to get you synced up and get your data from computer A to computer B. If you’re having trouble figuring out how to swap from Windows to Mac in the future, my number one recommendation would be to plan ahead and contact us before you make the switch and we’d be more than happy to help you out. 🙂

    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      Hey there, A!

      I hope you always take the time to reflect on the best way to manage your passwords. Of course, we’d be just giddy if that reflection leads to the choice to stick with us, but a huge part of our mission has always been to help more people become more secure by creating strong, unique passwords for all of their logins. In our perfect universe, 1Password would be everything everybody wants and we’d be part of that journey for every one of you, but at the end of the day the mere fact that everyone here is so worried about the safety and security of their 1Password data means we’re doing our job – even if that means some of y’all decide to head elsewhere.

      To hopefully ease your fears about folks not being ready yet to switch to cloud storage and our personal preferences, I think I can expound somewhat and provide some clarity. Of course, we do hope that through education and discussion, we can show some folks that a 1Password account is safe place to store their data and we think, given time, some (or maybe even most) folks will change their minds and happily make the switch.

      Of course, implicit in the statement that we believe a 1Password membership is the best choice for most is the implied statement that we know it’s not going to be the best choice for some. If you’re open to a 1Password membership and simply have some concerns about cloud storage, we’re happy to answer questions and provide resources on our security design to help you make the decision. Yes, we probably will spend some time extolling the virtues of 1Password memberships in hopes that you’re one of those folks who simply wasn’t ready yet, but the choice is yours. Our mission is to give you the right resources to make these decisions for yourself, not to make them for you. Local vaults remain an option for exactly this reason.

      As for Windows, I’ll pilfer a bit from a previous comment of Dave’s as I think he summed it up well. We do know that there are a fair number of folks using 1Password on Windows who are asking for local vaults. Whether we’ll be able to add them to 1Password 6 or a future release is anyone’s guess at this point, but this is simply a matter of timing and resources and choosing priorities. Since we did need to rebuild 1Password for Windows to support 1Password memberships, that was and is where development is focused, but we are actively listening and doing the best we can to find solutions that work for everyone. 🙂

  11. Tom H
    Tom H says:

    This reads like a very odd comments board; a series of effusive stories about how 1password membership has changed lives. Sorry to be brutal people, but 1password is trustworthy (to those of us who better understand cryptography and web security) because we can hold all our data locally, and only our brain knows the decrypt password.

    1password has changed my online life for the better, but 1password membership leaves me deeply skeptical (from a security standpoint) and deeply disappointed in 1password (from a corporate trust standpoint). There are clearly people on the Board of Agile that are pushing for “growth”, and see that 95% of revenue comes from a subscriber model. To Dave Teare, and the other original founders of 1pass, I encourage you, nay implore you, to stand up for what you know is right, and continue to support standalone purchase with local vaults as the de facto model on which 1password works.

    The moment you stop supporting updates for standalone installations is the moment when you will lose many, many of your most loyal and oldest customers: those who trusted you and helped make you who you are today.

    Do the right thing!

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Tom.

      To be clear, Roustem and I represent a full 50% of the four members of AgileBits board of directors. My wife is one of the others and my life-long friend and close confident Jeff Shiner is the fourth. All of us work directly with customers each and every day, so we’ll all well aware of the needs of our customers. As for investors, we have none. Just ourselves. So there’s no need to worry about outside influences pushing us around.

      We’re all excited about 1Password memberships because we saw how 1Password could be even better and we then proceeded to invest years of our lives into working towards our vision. I highlighted several of the reasons why we believe 1Password memberships to be far superior to standalone vaults and believe me I could have went on for much longer had I felt the need to enumerate them all. Thankfully I didn’t as the RSI in my wrists would have gotten much much worse had I decided to go that route. 🙂

      I appreciate your concerns and understand that we’re unlike practically every other company you’ll find (Basecamp is the closest parallel I can think of) so I can see why you think we have a vicious board that we need to report to. While we do have a board of directors as required by law, the most “vicious” person there is our accountant who does indeed remind us during each meeting that we haven’t had a paid upgrade in over 4 years. She needs to ensure the lights stay on and people get paid, so it’s a good point to raise, but since she also does customer support directly, she understands all too well how confusing paid upgrades can be and agrees with us when we say we need to hold off for a bit longer.

      Anyway, long story short we run our company the best we can and help as many people as we can. Sometimes we make mistakes and when we do we correct them. All I can ask is that you look at our history over the last 11 years and judge for yourself if it is “the right thing” or not. We believe we do.

      Take care,

      ❤️✌️🇨🇦

      ++dave;

  12. Alex
    Alex says:

    Yet less than a month ago, AgileBits support said1:

    “1Password 4 remains the only officially supported version for local vaults”, and “we’re going to remove the older local vault reader + sync support in the upcoming 1Password 6.6 update”.

    Either the right hand doesn’t know what the left hand is doing, or you have the most confusing messaging of any product company in the world, or you don’t have any idea what you’re doing and you’re just making it up as you go, or you’re deliberately being obscure to try to confuse people.

    Which is it?

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Hi Alex,

      I apologize for the confusion. I’ll do my best to clear it up!

      First and foremost, the link you included points to a post in our Windows discussion forum. On the Windows side of the world the story is not as enjoyable as it is on the Mac side of things. I tried to address that within my post here when I said:

      These worries are compounded by the fact that 1Password 6 for Windows was designed from the ground up to support 1Password Teams customers only (and then later expanded to include family and individual plans), and we are unsure how this adventure will play out on the Windows side of the world, so we haven’t made any public announcements about when support for standalone vaults will be added, if ever.

      So yes, 1Password 4 remains the only way to use standalone vaults on Windows. There’s a considerable amount of work required to add support for licenses and standalone vaults and two completely different sync methods to 1Password 6 for Windows and at this time we simply don’t have the cycles available to make this happen. The reason is 1Password 6 for Windows was a complete rewrite so all of this code would need to be recreated. There are many other things on my Windows’ teams plate at the moment so I’ve asked the team to focus on those items instead of standalone vaults.

      Regarding the part about “we’re going to remove the older local vault reader + sync support in the upcoming 1Password 6.6 update”, this was referencing a half-baked feature were we were allowing you to add local vaults to 1Password 6 in read-only mode. This feature was causing a lot of confusion because it wasn’t fully implemented yet and those who added these vaults rightly had the expectation that 1Password 6 would then sync them. In version 6.6 we decided to simply remove this feature and not bring it back until we had full support for everything. I know how much work that will be, however, and as such I forced myself to type the “if ever” addendum to make it clear I wasn’t making a promise that it was in the works.

      I hope that helps clear things up. Please let me know.

      ++dave;

  13. Kirk
    Kirk says:

    Our company utilizes a “happy customer” focus and culture as well… love that.

    I was a Chronos SoHo Notes user and have acclimated fairly well to a 1PassWord subscription, but I do have a few items that I would love to see incorporated into your program, specifically in the Secure Notes feature. 1.) A better search feature, to be able to find specific keywords in notes. I know it will find the note my search word is in, but my notes can be very long… I’d like to find the word itself within the note itself. I keep relative data about things such as the last oil change within various vehicles, home repair, doctor’s visits, orders and purchases… they can be difficult to locate within a note. 2.) Font capability within notes. Size, Color and BOLD alone would assist in finding items within notes. 3.) HyperLinks within notes.

    SoHo had all those features, highlighting search word, including being able to attach .jpgs within notes. Unfortunately, they were at the end of life. I am thrilled to hear you aren’t!

    SoHo Notes was where I used to keep all my passwords (with links to the websites), and although 1PassWord definitely beats it there, the Secure Notes leave much to be desired. Please apply some focus on them! I believe it is an area you could be rewarded for as many of their clients need a place to go, too. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Hi Kirk! 👋🏼

      Thanks for sharing with me how we can make 1Password even better. I agree with your suggestions – these would all be lovely additions to Secure Notes and perhaps the general notes field that all items contain. Hopefully we can add them in a future version – I know I would love using them myself. 🙂

      Take care,

      ++dave;

  14. Margaret
    Margaret says:

    I love that you flooded the comments with your own employees. Nice touch. I have spent hundreds of dollars on 1Password and have recommended it without reservation to many people. However, pushing people to store their data in your cloud and charging them for it is too much for me. I’ll continue to use standalone 1Password until a future update forces me to use the cloud, and then I’ll find another password manager. But I refuse to endorse it anymore. (https://medium.com/@kennwhite/who-moved-my-cheese-1password-6a98a0fc6c56 was an eye-opening article.)

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Hi Margaret,

      Thanks for reaching out and sharing your concerns. Regarding the comments, I can see how you might see it that way but that’s certainly not what I had in mind. You see when I was writing this post everyone had ideas for how they wanted to see the post done and I was getting buried in feedback and opinions. I eventually decided to write it exactly as I wanted it to be and told my team to come share their personal feelings and what they wanted to see in this post in the comments. I also wanted people to see that folks at AgileBits are still using local vaults today and I wanted them to share their reasons so everyone could see that we’re a diverse family with diverse needs. FWIW, here’s what I said in our internal Slack channel:

      Anyway, it’s great to know how passionate you are about 1Password and the fact you love your local vaults. As for Kenn White’s post, he’s a great guy and we had some good discussions in the comments there on how we can make 1Password even better. Security is a process and we’ve been continually improving that process for 11 years now and we have no plans on stopping any time soon.

      Take care and thank you so much for supporting 1Password all these years! We wouldn’t be here without you and I’m thankful that you’ve enabled me to be able to work at my dream job for the last 11 years. Thank you! ❤️

      ++dave;

  15. Jeff
    Jeff says:

    I guess I am one of the 0.1% who use WLAN syncing (I had no idea it was so low).

    This blog post does help to reassure me that local vaults aren’t going away today, but I still can’t help but feel this is the beginning of the end. I previously used LastPass and moved to 1Password a couple of years ago specifically because of the good local vault support. While the Mac app might still support local vaults, the fact that other apps are being put out without local vault support tells me where the priorities are and how the future is headed. I probably won’t be moving away from 1Password today out of sheer laziness, but I guess it is time to start keeping an eye out for a replacement.

    I don’t argue that cloud syncing is probably better for most users. The reason why I switched to 1Password is that it seemed to be built with the privacy conscious power user in mind though. I can’t say that anymore.

    BTW, this seems to have softened a bit, but the previous stance highlighted in the Motherboard article of “if you really want a one-time license you can email us and plead your case” is extremely arrogant. If I have to beg you to sell me your software, you obviously don’t want me as a customer.

    Reply
    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      Hey, Jeff! I’m glad we were able to ease your fears somewhat. I think that 0.1% surprises a lot of folks because for those who choose WLAN sync it’s something that makes a lot of intuitive sense. Despite thinking of my self as a giant nerd, I still seem to struggle with it a bit and often need to phone a friend (or ping a friend in Slack, as the case may be) for help as networking in general is not one of my strengths.

      That said, while we continue to be privacy conscious with 1Password memberships, what’s truly most important is that you feel comfortable that you’re not sharing anything you don’t want to. I’d encourage you to take a gander at our privacy policy for memberships, if you’re so inclined. It’s at least possible it could change your mind.

      As for what the future holds, I hope you don’t read too much into 1Password 6 for Windows not supporting standalone vaults. I definitely understand why folks see this as an omen and the fact that we can’t promise they will be added any time soon doesn’t help, but we genuinely have no intention of abandoning standalone vaults. As Dave has said in response to other comments, standalone vault support would need to be built from scratch for 1Password 6 for Windows and we still have some work left to do on memberships, so we can’t make any promises on the Windows side of things, but that will not affect our plans for Mac. That much I can promise.

      As for the Motherboard article, I don’t think that has ever truly been our stance and if anyone has said that to you, I apologize. You can still buy a standalone license without ever talking to us on the Mac App Store. Of course, if folks do e-mail us looking for a standalone license, we’re happy to help. As I mentioned in a previous comment, I personally will still likely mention 1Password memberships and double-check that a license really is what they want. This might annoy some and to those folks I apologize in advance, but I seek only to inform folks of their options. I never want to force anyone’s hand. Rather than needing to plead your case, a simple “no, I’m not interested,” will suffice. We definitely still want you as a customer, no begging required. 🙂

  16. Brian
    Brian says:

    I’m also a standalone vault user. A few years ago I made the switch to Windows as I just wasn’t happy with a lot of things about the Mac. I had purchased a 1Password for Windows license and then later discovered that I can’t use 1Password 6 because of the lack of support for standalone vaults. I really hope this comes soon as I don’t like the experience of 1Password 4 on a touch screen device.

    Reply
    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      Hey Brian! 1Password 4 was explicitly designed to be a desktop app, so I can easily understand why you’d be a bit less than enthused about it on a touchscreen device. Of course, 1Password 6 is still a desktop app, but I’ve used it on my mom’s fancy laptop that folds into a touchscreen tablet and it comports itself quite well without a keyboard and track pad/mouse.

      Now that Windows 10 has been around for a while, we really do need to give more thought to touchscreen devices. Touchscreens were really uncommon outside mobile devices not terribly long ago, but with Windows 10 maturing so well, nearly all PC manufacturers starting to embrace the convertible laptop, and all-in-one PCs using touchscreens as a means to create a smaller desktop footprint, I’m sure we’ll only see more folks making the switch in the coming years. We spend a lot of time thinking about how new software technologies might impact 1Password 4 for Windows, but I know I personally hadn’t considered the effect the new ways we all interface with our technology may have on the 1Password user experience and how that might impact folks using 1Password 4 for Windows.

      I really appreciate your feedback and look forward to having a discussion with our developers about it. One of the great things about having customers who use 1Password in so many different ways on so many different devices is that the experiences y’all share really do help us make 1Password better. No matter how many devices we pile onto our desk, we can never cover every possibility so it’s a good thing we have folks like you helping us out. Our work on 1Password 6 for Windows still needs to be focused on 1Password memberships for now as we still have a lot more to do, but I hope we do have some good news for you in the future. 🙂

  17. Tom
    Tom says:

    I’m not a fan of the web version and hope that one day we’ll see everything inside the apps and I’m still disappointed about the lack of backups. Why are backups not an option?

    Also when and why did you start calling it a “membership” and members. It’s a subscription to a service. I’m a subscriber. It feels like someone in some department thought that pushing memberships vs subscriptions would soften the blow.

    Funny thing is switching to a 1Password subscription while I second guessed it did not irritate me. Calling it a membership is like nails on a chalkboard to me. Probably because it comes across as something “corporate” would do and not the “family friend” 1Password would do. But that’s just me.

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Hi Tom!

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts with me. It’s funny what you say about “memberships” as it took us well over a year before we started calling them by that name. The way it came about was I was driving home from our annual AGConf team get together and the way it worked out I was in the car with my mother in-law for over two hours with nobody else. It was great as we got to spend the whole car ride talking without any distractions. During this ride I tried to explain to Joan again and again about how we sell both licenses and accounts and how they each behaved. I had no idea how close I was to the technology and how blinded I was to how confusing these things can be. We literally spent two hours discussing this one topic and it took the entire time before we came to a common understanding. There were two out comes from this drive: one was we had to pick one and make it the default and run with it; and the second one was a new name for accounts/subscriptions. Once Joan started thinking about it in terms of a membership as opposed to focusing on the payment method itself, things started to click for her. I liked the term so we rolled with it.

      So long story short, I’m sorry that memberships sound like nails on a chalk board to you but the term helps others and quite frankly I’ve become quite smitten with the term now that I’ve used it for a while. With that said, I’m not going overboard and calling customers as members. That would just be silly. 😉

      Regarding backups, they are all performed at the server level. I understand why you’re asking for them and intellectually adding local backups seems like a super easy thing to add, but with 1Password accounts the server is the source of truth so it’s actually more complicated that you’d expect to be able to restore a backup from a client device. Given the server has the backups already, it seemed overkill to invest much time reconciling these challenges. Still, I understand that this is still important to some people and it’s something we’re considering for future versions of 1Password.

      Thanks again for sharing your thoughts and giving me a chance to share my car ride story. Take care,

      ++dave;

    • Tom
      Tom says:

      So understand your point but really one person in a car does is not really a user study. The unfortunate part is yeah you may have called it a membership over a year ago from what I can see it just happened when all this came to light. I was not stupid and knew I had to move to a subscription or find another option. I went with you guys. Unfortunately your reaction gave you more of as another user pointed out the streisand effect.

      I’ve always been happy with you guys but this article is not the way to handle the 0.01, 0.1 or whatever they really are. The article/comments came off a bit condescending and actually in my case upset a current user. I respect a lot of people that have made comments but feel the transparency is weak. If local vault are out own it. If you’re going to push a subscription sorry membership own it. Your a business and I expect that you’ll so what you need to do to provide for you employees.

      I am a family subscriber and am happy though I can see improvements. I still recommend 1Password. The problem I have is that you made a business decision for the better of your company and instead of just saying this is why you guys did what you did or are going to do what you did you have strung people along.

      As far as
      “intellectually adding local backups seems like a super easy thing to add”
      not sure on the “intellectually” but in reality a compromise is possible. I understand the complexities but you could offer a nightly backup. Yes it comes as a cost for you because of bandwidth but it would depend on how it was done. It’s a matter of transferring your (1password) existing backup to the local machine. As you I’m sure know it’s very common to back up to more than one machine. Rule of 3. It bothers me that a security focused company can’t see the need for people to have backup. Even if your main cliental does not understand that they should be pushed into is just like they have been to a password manager.

      Also I would like to point out that Dave while I don’t know personally what I’ve read from you, discussed with you and others I’ve liked. I’m giving my opinion as a fan looking outside in. I love 1Password but for me the article did not address things but came off a bit in poor taste.

      The backup question a real answer would be great.
      Local vault support make it cut and dry.
      Windows support a real answer.
      etc.

      If the numbers are really 95% realistically devoting time to the 5 % would be irresponsible. That being said I’m not sure that a centralized 1Password it the future. The 95% as they get educated like they have by using a password manager will want their data when they want it. Be it a decentralized solution or something else.

    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Ha! I agree 100%! One person in a car does indeed NOT constitute a user study. 🙂

      Of course there was a lot more that went into it than just that one discussion but that’s how the seed was planted and quite frankly after using various ways of saying 1Password account and 1Password membership for the previous 14 months or so it didn’t take me long to become quite smitten with the word. We’re all users of 1Password – I’ve worked on it and used it every single day for 11 years now – so I like to think I get to participate in the user studies as well. 😉

      I hear you loud and clear that things have not been handled as well as they could be. I’ve lived through it so perhaps I’m too close to it, but I do know we tried our best and considering we’re still here alive and well I’m going to go out on a limb that it wasn’t a total disaster. With that said, I wish I saw The Count Censored sooner as it makes it clear that if you don’t tell your own story than others will tell it for you.

      You do indeed bring up a lot of good points and I don’t want to belabour the point but I have to disagree with your “devoting time to the 5 % would be irresponsible”. Logically I see where you are coming from but I simply don’t agree the idea that I should ignore them just because they don’t represent the masses. Our customers have gotten us to where we are today and we’re not about to forget how we got here. I tried to capture that feeling in this post and will do my best to make as many people as happy as I can. Of course we can’t be everything to everyone, but we can certainly try to help as many as we can.

      Take care, Tom. It was great talking with you.

      ++dave;

  18. Marc Benko
    Marc Benko says:

    A person with a basic sense of security would never store passwords on a remote server for the sake of “easy syncing”. The modern world worries me.

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      Hi Marc,

      I would agree with you if indeed the modern world expected you to store your passwords on a remote server. What the modern world is saying is you store an encrypted blob of gibberish on a remote server which only you have the keys to decrypt and turn back into sensible information.

      Many apps talk about encryption but our security design takes it much further. In addition to things like Secure Remote Password and of course SSL, we introduced the Secret Key which is unique for each 1Password account. This secret key is 128 bits of random data that is generated for your account and it plays a key role in the encryption process. Basically it means that even if an attacker stole our database and tried to brute force your Master Password, they would be unable to do so, even if you used a weak Master Password (we obviously suggest you still use a good one to further strengthen your security!).

      And it’s not just about “easy syncing” as it goes well beyond that. Creating additional vaults is super easy, secure sharing within teams and family accounts becomes possible, along with backups, item history, and data loss protections. Together they make 1Password memberships the best way to use 1Password.

      With all that said, if you’re not comfortable with the cloud, we’re not going to beat you over the head with it. In time we hope you warm up to it but if you don’t, standalone vaults are your friend.

      Take care,

      ++dave;

  19. Marco
    Marco says:

    Thanks for making these clarifications. Certainly I know much of the scenarios you describe on what can go wrong. But still, I am a professional person who knows these things (even if sometimes learned by making mistakes) and I would not use a solution were I cannot determine where to put my critical data.
    Reading that you do not plan to have local vaults made obsolete I am happy that I can rely on this useful and easy to use software a while longer.

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      You’re very welcome, Marco! Thank you for letting me know that this post helped you. ❤️

      ++dave;

  20. Warren
    Warren says:

    After using 1Password for many years, and preaching about how good it was to anyone who’ll listen the relentless push towards memberships and the rejection of stand alone Windows users has really frustrsted and embarrassed me.

    I moved on yesterday and will unfollow 1Password. I won’t bother you guys anymore but I will not recommend it to anyone anymore.

    Reply
    • Dave Teare
      Dave Teare says:

      I’m so sorry to hear that, Warren! I do hope we can win you back in time but certainly I respect your decision to do whatever makes the most sense for you and your current situation.

      Just please do me a favour for old times sake and continue to use strong, unique passwords everywhere. Security on the internet is too important to compromise. Also please review the security design of any apps you use to ensure they protect your security and privacy with true protections and never sell your information and know which sites you browse. It’s a lot harder to find than you might expect.

      Take care and I wish you nothing but the best! ✌️🙏❤️

      ++dave;

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