1Password 6.6 for Android: Crunchy outer cookie, velvety smooth filling

While the solar eclipse was happening last Monday, another dramatic event involving a dark, disc-shaped object was also taking place in New York. Google announced the release of the next version of Android and revealed that it is named after the best-selling cookie in the world. Like its namesake, Android Oreo is equal parts crunchy and sweet. On the crunchy side, it delivers enhanced performance, better battery life, and stronger protection for your device. On the sweet side, it provides yummy new features like adaptive icons, notification categories, and of course, Autofill.

Much like Android Oreo, 1Password 6.6 is also made up of layers that are both crunchy and sweet. I hope you’ll forgive me for indulging my inner kid though, as I twist this cookie open and go straight for the deliciously sweet filling.

Mmm… sweet, sweet filling

When Google announced, earlier this year, that the next version of Android would include built-in support for Autofill, we almost lost our collective minds. In fact, I was so excited that I jumped straight into the developer preview and whipped together a prototype to share with you. Since that initial frenzy of excitement, we’ve been hard at work refining and polishing up the implementation in order to deliver the sugary-sweet filling experience that you deserve. With 1Password 6.6, I’m extremely proud to finally get to introduce you to Autofill with 1Password.

Using Autofill with 1Password, you can now save and fill your usernames and passwords in apps.

Saving a login with Android Autofill from AgileBits on Vimeo.

Saving a new Login is as simple as typing your credentials into an app and tapping the sign in button. When 1Password detects that you’ve entered a username and password, you will be asked if you want to save those details. From there, you can unlock 1Password if necessary and adjust the title or destination vault for your new Login item before saving it.

Filling existing Login items is a delectable experience too.

Retrieving a login with Android Autofill from AgileBits on Vimeo.

If 1Password is locked and it detects sign-in fields in an app, it will prompt you to “Autofill with 1Password”. Once you unlock 1Password, you’ll see a list of matching items and have the option of viewing possible matches if they exist. If 1Password is already unlocked, then matching items are displayed immediately below the active text field in the app. Tapping on one of the items will fill the username and password values for that item into the appropriate fields.

If you’ve also sweetened your device with Android Oreo and you’re looking to try that silky smooth filling for yourself, jump on over to our support site for more details about using 1Password to fill and save in apps.

More cookie to enjoy

Once you’re done with the filling in an Oreo, there are still those satisfyingly crunchy cookie wafers to savour. Similarly, we’ve also got a couple more Android Oreo goodies in this update for you to enjoy.

Android Oreo provides more fine-grained control over notifications by dividing them into categories and allowing you to adjust the settings for each category to your liking. You can adjust the sounds and visual indicators for a category or even turn off notifications for that category entirely. To extend this configurability to notifications from 1Password, we’ve separated them into three categories: sync status, sync failure, and 1Password account activity.

Adaptive icons in Android Oreo make it easier for app icons to look their best on any home screen. We thought that was a pretty tasty improvement, so we’ve updated the 1Password icon accordingly. Regardless of whether the launcher on your device favours icons as circles, squircles, rounded squares, or squares, the 1Password icon will adapt to match.

Other delectable treats

With the delicious improvements above, you’d be forgiven for thinking that only cookie-themed treats are available in 1Password 6.6. I’m happy to clear up any such misconception by mentioning a couple of improvements that don’t depend on Android Oreo.

In this update, we’ve added support for downloading and viewing Documents from your 1Password.com account. Once downloaded, an encrypted copy of your Document will be stored on device and made available for viewing whenever you need it.

We’ve also laid the groundwork for some filling that isn’t part of a cookie sandwich. We’ve been working with Google on a protocol that enables direct communication between apps and password managers. We’ve added support for the protocol in this update and we’ll be reaching out to developers about integrating support into their apps in an upcoming blog post.

If you’d like to read about the many additional improvements and fixes in this update that don’t quite fit with the dessert-themed puns, feel free to jump on over to the release notes. I hope you enjoy all of the treats that we packed into this release!

8 replies
    • Michael Verde
      Michael Verde says:

      Hi Belayet,

      Sorry that I missed your comment previously. I would be happy to help you get set up using Autofill with 1Password!

      Assuming that you’ve got a device that is running Android 8.0 Oreo, you can enable Autofill by launching 1Password and then navigating to Settings, then Filling and tapping on the switch beside Autofill. This will take you to the system settings where you can select 1Password as your Autofill provider.

      Once you’ve enabled 1Password as your Autofill provider in the system settings, you will be prompted to fill with 1Password whenever it detects that there is a sign-in form within an app. Please feel free to let me know if you have any questions or need any additional help getting set up!

      Cheers,
      Michael

    • Michael Verde
      Michael Verde says:

      Hi Adam,

      Although I would love to say that Autofill support is available in Chrome, it’s not quite there yet. In order for 1Password to provide Autofill in Chrome, the browser first needs to integrate support for the Autofill framework. Once that work is done, it should be relatively straightforward for us to provide the same Autofill features in Chrome that it currently provides for apps.

      I don’t have any inside details on when Autofill support might be available in Chrome (even if I did, I’m sure that I would be sworn to secrecy), so I’ll just have to keep my fingers crossed along with you. In the meantime, you can still use the 1Password Keyboard and Accessibility service for those times when Autofill isn’t available.

      I hope that explanation helps. Let me know if you have any other questions!

      Cheers,
      Michael

  1. Posts
    Posts says:

    Omgosh, I soooo needed this post today! My week has been the worst and has the potential to go downhill. Thanks again, you’re the best…

    Reply
    • Michael Verde
      Michael Verde says:

      I’m happy to hear that this post was much needed boost in your week! We’re pretty excited about how Autofill can completely transform the experience of saving and using your login credentials. It seems that our excitement can be contagious and I’m glad that it helped you in this case :)

      Cheers,
      Michael

  2. Apoorv Khatreja
    Apoorv Khatreja says:

    This looks awesome! I just tried this with Android Oreo and an app that I’m working on – it works correctly for detecting saved logins and suggests them correctly, however, I do not get a prompt to save a new login when I use the “sign up” option. Could you tell me a little bit about what kind of information 1Password uses under the hood to figure out that a “sign up” or “log in” form is being displayed on screen?

    Alternatively, is there a developer document somewhere that tells developers how to modify their login screens to work better with 1Password on Android Oreo?

    Reply
    • Kate Sebald
      Kate Sebald says:

      Hey Apoorv! I’m glad you’re excited about autofill on Android Oreo! I’m stuck on Nougat myself, so I’m a bit jealous. 😉 I don’t know that we have any developer documentation ourselves, but Google has documentation for testing your app with autofill and some general information about the autofill framework that may help you out here.

      If these Android developer guides don’t help you get the proper prompts to save a new login item, let me know. I can always check if our Android developers have further advice when they’re back on Monday. 😊

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *