1Password X: A look at the future of 1Password in the browser

“Wouldn’t it be cool if 1Password could do X?” is a question we often ask ourselves. The values for X are always changing, but some ideas come up again and again. Wouldn’t it be cool if…

  • When you log in to a site, 1Password is right there on the page ready to fill?
  • You could use 1Password without downloading the app?
  • Linux users and Chrome OS users could join in on the fun?

Now 1Password can do all these and more. We call it 1Password X, and it’s our brand new, full-featured experience that runs entirely in your browser.

It’s super easy to set up, deploy, and use. It works everywhere Chrome works, including Linux and Chrome OS. And it’s a re-imagination of how 1Password works on the web.

X is for extension

Before we jump in, I want to address one thing you may be thinking: our X is a letter, not a version number. Our X is a hat tip to one of the most beloved features of 1Password, namely our 1Password extension.

The extension is what allows us to have the little 1Password icon in your browser toolbar. I call it our bread and butter, and I couldn’t live without it. 😊

1Password X builds on this experience and takes it to the next level. The most visible change you just saw above – your logins are now available directly within the webpage you are viewing!

It’s smart, too. 1Password anticipates what you need and shows you the options that are most relevant to your current task. If you are signing up for a new site, 1Password suggests a generated password for you right then and there.

You can also save your new login, name it, and pick which vault to store it in.

X is for Linux

One of the most popular requests of all time has been Linux support. In fact, the forum thread asking for Linux has over 75,000 views. That’s a lot of cold penguins. 🙂

Because 1Password X is a Chrome extension, it works everywhere Chrome is available, including Linux. In fact, we initially shared 1Password X exclusively with Linux users as we wanted to make sure we nailed it.

Tim, our chief sysadmin and “beardless keeper of keys and grounds” is a hardcore Linux evangelist who, until now, has had no other choice than to use Wine to run 1Password. Tim has been our toughest critic over the years for our lack of Linux support, and so far he’s been thrilled.

There’s still lots of work to do, but we have thousands of happy Linux users already enjoying 1Password X. And we can’t wait to invite all of the other penguins in out of the cold! 😘

X is for exceedingly powerful

1Password X has all of the power of a full-featured app. And because it connects directly to your 1Password account, everything you expect from 1Password is there – your vaults, your items, and all their details.

And we’ve sprinkled in some additional features to absolutely delight you:

  • Keyboard navigation: We know this is a big one for power users, so we made sure everything can be done without lifting your fingers from the keyboard.
  • Smart search: Just start typing to find exactly what you need – ideal for when you have multiple logins for a site.
  • Perfect memory: 1Password remembers what you were doing last, whether you were in the middle of a search or looking at an item’s details.
  • One-time password filling: Your two-factor authentication codes are filled just like usernames and passwords.
  • Authentication dialog filling: If you ever see one those old-school HTTP authentication prompts, rest assured that 1Password can fill them.

My personal favourite has to be our amazing new search – I just start typing and my matching items appear automatically. I love it so much that filling one-time passwords had to take second factor place. It was close, though – only 30 seconds behind! 😃

X is for extra easy setup

Historically, we’ve needed to teach people how to first install and set up the app, and then take them out of the app to install the extension. With 1Password X, they’re one and the same. Just install it, enter your Master Password, and you’re in.

Because there’s no need to install a separate desktop app, deployment within team environments is as simple as can be. And by using multiple Chrome profiles, your team members can share the same machine while having access to their own 1Password data.

1Password X can even be installed on Chrome OS, which makes me super excited as now I can finally buy one of those lovely new Pixelbooks. 🤘

X is for Excelsior!

1Password X is a radical new way of using 1Password, but it’s not (yet) for everyone. It’s still in its early stages so some features are not yet available. For example, it’s not yet possible to customize generated passwords or use browsers like Safari, Firefox, and Edge.

But it is an exciting new way to use 1Password on the web, and for me, that outweighs any drawbacks. I’ve been using 1Password X exclusively for the last 6 months, and I couldn’t be happier.

So is 1Password X for you? If you’re running Linux or Chrome OS, you should jump right in. Or if you’re adventurous and enjoy the thrill of discovering new things while being on the cutting edge, then 1Password X is for you – it runs fine alongside the 1Password apps and extension you already use.

1Password X was designed for our hosted 1Password service and connects directly to your account. It is available in English, French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish and can be installed from the Chrome Web Store:

Install 1Password X

I hope you’re as excited about 1Password X as I am! Learn how to get started with 1Password X and join the discussion in the 1Password Support forum to let us know what you think! ❤️

Now let’s all go join Harold in that rocket ship and explore what’s possible! 😃 🚀

Integrate 1Password into your Android apps

Account sign-up and sign-in is a critical piece of your app, but it’s also the part that is most likely to create friction for new users. It might be necessary for your app to collect information such as an email address and password, but let’s face it, those details are rather tedious to type out.

Here’s something that happens far more often than it should. I’m out with a friend and they’ve just told me about this fantastic new app. I get fired up and download it to my phone, only to be confronted with a wall of text fields. I need to register for a new account before I can continue, and that seems like a lot of work. So I tell myself that I’ll do it when I get home and of course, I forget all about it. By the time I look at the app again, I’ve lost that initial excitement and more often than not, I just delete the app.

If I do give the app another chance, I still need to go through the hassle of creating a new account. Of course, I have 1Password to help me here, but I still need to switch between apps, copying and pasting the values as I go. Wouldn’t it be so much better if the app could just ask 1Password to create my credentials and then sign me in?

I’m very happy to say that this is no longer just wishful thinking! We’ve been working closely with Google and other leading password managers on a protocol for Android called OpenYOLO. This new protocol provides the kind of seamless integration that would have saved me so much of the frustration above. The best part is that implementing the protocol is simple, and you can get started on integrating it into your Android app today!

Getting started with OpenYOLO


You Only Login Once (YOLO) is Google’s internal code name for their Smart Lock for Passwords API on Android. OpenYOLO is its open-source successor that enables client apps to communicate directly with supported providers like 1Password. Using OpenYOLO, your app can ask 1Password to create, save, retrieve, or delete its user credentials.

It’s almost effortless to integrate 1Password with your app using OpenYOLO! Let me show you just how easy it is to get started…

Import the library

Add this line to your app’s build.gradle file to import the OpenYOLO API:

dependencies {
    compile 'org.openyolo:openyolo-api:0.3.1'
}

Get the client

You’ll need an instance of CredentialClient in order to interact with OpenYOLO. It provides convenience methods for sending requests and retrieving responses.

mCredentialClient = CredentialClient.getInstance(this);

Prepare the request

For each operation, your app needs to prepare a request and retrieve an Intent for handling it. You can then hand off the request to OpenYOLO with startActivityForResult(). OpenYOLO will take the request and determine if there are any credential providers like 1Password available to handle it. If multiple providers are available, the user will be prompted to select which one to use to complete the request.

Handle the response

Once the chosen provider has completed the request, a response will be returned to your app in onActivityResult(). You can use CredentialClient to pull the relevant information from the response.

Working with 1Password to simplify users’ experiences

Signing up new users

To avoid another story like mine above, you can assist users with new account registration in your app. Before prompting me to manually enter my email address and choose a unique password, your app can make a request to have those credentials generated.

HintRetrieveRequest request = HintRetrieveRequest.fromAuthMethods(AuthenticationMethods.EMAIL);

Intent hintIntent = mCredentialClient.getHintRetrieveIntent(request);

startActivityForResult(hintIntent, HINT_REQUEST_CODE);

In my case, 1Password will prompt me to confirm that I want to create new credentials and OpenYOLO will return details to your app’s onActivityResult().

if (requestCode == HINT_REQUEST_CODE) {
    HintRetrieveResult result = mCredentialClient.getHintRetrieveResult(data);

    if (result.isSuccessful()) {
        Hint hint = mCredentialClient.getHintRetrieveResult(data).getHint();

        signUpUser(hint.getIdentifier(), hint.getGeneratedPassword());
    }
}

Saving user credentials

My account details are all filled in, and I’m ready to start exploring the app, but of course I want to make sure those new account details are stored in 1Password. This will come in handy the next time I need to sign in to your app. You can help here too with a simple save request to OpenYOLO.

Credential credential = new Credential.Builder(mEmail, AuthenticationMethods.EMAIL,
AuthenticationDomain.getSelfAuthDomain(this))
.setPassword(mPassword)
.build();

Intent saveIntent = mCredentialClient.getSaveIntent(CredentialSaveRequest.fromCredential(credential));

startActivityForResult(saveIntent, SAVE_REQUEST_CODE);

Now I am ready to go! Only a couple of seconds after downloading your app, I am all signed up for an account and more importantly, I can begin using it!

Signing in with existing credentials

Okay, now the fun part! My brand new and shiny Pixel 2 XL arrives and I download all of my favourite apps to it. I still need to sign in to my apps, but you’ve gone and saved me all the hassle by once again using OpenYOLO.

CredentialRetrieveRequest request = CredentialRetrieveRequest.fromAuthMethods(AuthenticationMethods.EMAIL);

Intent retrieveIntent = mCredentialClient.getCredentialRetrieveIntent(request);

startActivityForResult(retrieveIntent, RETRIEVE_REQUEST_CODE);

In response to this request, 1Password will prompt me to select my sign-in credentials and OpenYOLO will return them to your app in onActivityResult():

if (requestCode == RETRIEVE_REQUEST_CODE) {
    CredentialRetrieveResult result = mCredentialClient.getCredentialRetrieveResult(data);

    if (result.isSuccessful()) {
        Credential credential = mCredentialClient.getCredentialRetrieveResult(data).getCredential();

        signInUser(credential.getIdentifier(), credential.getPassword());
    }
}

Less noise, more fun!

That’s it! With a few changes to your code, your app now integrates with 1Password using OpenYOLO. This decreases noise from your app and more importantly saves your users time and effort so that they can get to the really important part – using your app.

If a solution like this is in place the next time my buddy gets me to try out your app, I would be able to create an account with a few taps, and they would have the opportunity to show me why they love the app!

DroidCon London 2017

At DroidCon London today, Google announced that OpenYOLO is now ready for developers like yourself to leverage its powers and bring it into the hands of users. If you are also attending the conference, send a wave at my colleague, Michael Verde! He will be available for a hands-on session to help integrate OpenYOLO into your apps.

Reach out to us

For further details on integrating OpenYOLO into your Android app, take a look through the open-source project available on Github. The repository also includes a handful of sample apps to help with development. If you’re curious about the protocol itself, you can read all about it in the OpenYOLO for Android specification.

If you have any questions, feedback or want to let us know that your Android app supports integration with 1Password through OpenYOLO, please reach out to us at support+android@agilebits.com. We look forward to hearing from you!

1Password living on the [Microsoft] Edge

I’ve long been curious about Microsoft Edge. It’s fast, light-weight, and much more secure than the Internet Explorer of my childhood. It had everything you look for in a browser … except 1Password support. Today that changes!

Thanks to the hard work of the Microsoft Edge and Windows Store teams, along with our own Windows team, I’m excited to announce that 1Password now has a lovely new home right on your Microsoft Edge toolbar. 🎉

Boldly go where no Login item has gone before

To bring your items with you to explore Microsoft Edge, first make sure you have 1Password 6.7 or later installed and set up. Then, head to the Windows Store and grab the 1Password extension. Open Microsoft Edge, enable the 1Password extension, and enjoy saving new Login items, opening and filling in Microsoft Edge from 1Password mini, filling addresses and credit card details, and easy access to the Strong Password Generator, just like you’ve come to know and love. If you’re still using an older version of 1Password, you can follow this handy guide to migrate your existing data to the latest version of 1Password to get ready to seek out new frontiers in Microsoft’s latest browser.

Hello dark mode, my old friend

As you’re working your own 1Password magic in Microsoft Edge, don’t forget to check out my favorite feature: its super-sleek dark mode. I love how it turns your 1Password extension icon into a lovely point of light on your toolbar and it’s perfect for late-night browsing.  Let the stars next to your favorites light up Microsoft Edge and help guide you to your most loved websites at the click of a Login item. Of course, if a different vision has been planted in your brain, the extension icon looks right at home in light mode too. 😉

To the Edge and beyond!

As stoked as we are about 1Password coming to Microsoft Edge, this is only the beginning and some finishing touches are coming in future releases. Support for keyboard shortcuts to fill logins and some tweaks to how mini lets you know you’re filling in Edge are included with the latest 1Password 6 for Windows beta. Additional improvements for filling on certain sites will also be addressed down the road.

Currently, the 1Password extension in Microsoft Edge requires 1Password 6.7 for Windows or later and a 1Password membership. We will be expanding Edge availability in future releases but if you’d like to enjoy using Edge sooner than later, now is a great time to give a 1Password membership a try. In addition to early access, there are many other benefits and it’s free for 30 days!

I hope you enjoy saving and filling in Microsoft Edge and, as always, we love seeing your feedback in our support forum. 😊

Introducing native messaging for the 1Password extension

I’m really excited to announce a brand new way for 1Password to save and fill in browsers. It’s not a new feature, and chances are you won’t even notice it. It’s called native messaging, and it changes the way 1Password integrates with your browser. In fact, if you use 1Password with Google Chrome, you might already be using it.1

Native messaging makes the 1Password extension faster, more stable, and more compatible in more situations. It improves the performance and reliability of the 1Password extension, and it’s the end result of talking with thousands of 1Password users over the years.

Once upon a time…


When the 1Password extension made its debut for Chrome in 2012, the options for browser extensions to talk to apps were limited. We settled on an approach using WebSockets, which creates a network connection on your computer between 1Password and the browser. Although it’s technically a network connection, the data is only transmitted locally and never leaves your computer. This served us well in the vast majority of cases, but for a significant number people, this connection was unreliable. Proxies, antivirus, and other security software could interfere with the connection and prevent saving and filling. These conflicts caused a lot of pain, especially for Windows users. Over time, it became clear that we needed a better approach.

Enter native messaging

Thankfully, Google led the way and introduced that better approach. Native messaging is a more direct way for browser extensions to communicate with apps. Unlike WebSockets, it doesn’t rely on creating a network connection between your computer and itself.

With native messaging, no longer is Chrome’s connection to 1Password subject to the vagaries of your network and computing environment. No matter how you’ve configured your computer, if you can run 1Password and Chrome, then native messaging will work for you. Last year, we began the transition to replace WebSockets with native messaging. In order for 1Password to use native messaging, we needed to update the extension and the apps. So in April, we released a version of the 1Password extension for Chrome with support for native messaging. Since then, all current versions of 1Password for Mac and Windows have been updated to use the new technology.

What will change?

If you notice any changes, they should only be positive. Communication is nearly instant, and you’ll be able to use the extension as soon as you open your browser. Native messaging removes entire classes of problems that have affected 1Password users for a long time. Conflicts with network proxies and firewalls in corporate computing environments, ad blocking software, and even productivity tools that lock you out of distracting sites should be a thing of the past. Security software that gets spooked by local network connections should relax down from red alert. And many less common scenarios will work much better with native mesaging as well.

How do I get it?!


The first thing to do is check for updates in 1Password to make sure you’re using the latest version available. The latest releases of 1Password all include native messaging. We even updated 1Password 4 for Windows to make sure everyone can take advantage of this advancement on both Mac and Windows. 1Password has built-in support for Google Chrome and many other browsers based on Chrome, like Opera. If you’re using a supported browser, 1Password will switch to native messaging immediately.

Some Chrome-based browsers are supported but require additional configuration to work with native messaging. See our support article for more details.

Conclusion

Native messaging is the future for the 1Password extension. For now it’s supported in Chrome, but support will be coming soon to other browsers like Firefox and Edge. We’ll let you know when native messaging arrives on new browsers — and stay tuned for more posts about the 1Password extension. There’s a lot of exciting stuff going on that I can’t wait to share with you. For now, I’d love to hear your thoughts about native messaging in the comments, and you can always connect with me and the rest of the extension team in the forum.


  1. I will use Chrome as a shorthand for Chrome and browsers based on
    Chromium such as Opera and Vivaldi throughout this post unless there are
    specific differences to note. 

Net neutrality: Keeping the Internet safe and accessible for all

Lo, everyone! Back on October 29, 1969, that two-letter greeting was the first message sent over ARPANET, the predecessor to the World Wide Web. Today, on July 12, 2017, people from around the globe are coming together for a day of action to fight for net neutrality. The principle of net neutrality states that all Internet traffic should be treated equally, but those who control the transmission of that data have been fighting for the right to place their preferred data in the fast lane and leave data they don’t like in a traffic jam. We here at AgileBits care quite a lot about data, and while we’re glad your sensitive data is safely locked away, we think the data we want to share on the Internet should remain accessible to everyone. Read more

iOS 9.2 adds 1Password to many new apps

During WWDC this year, Apple announced SFSafariViewController. This was really exciting news for us. Just imagine: if a third-party app used Safari as its in-app browser, that would mean that 1Password could fill Logins automatically without developers doing any extra work!

SFSafariViewController was introduced to everyone in iOS 9. Immediately, we began receiving reports from customers about 1Password disappearing from their favourite apps! It turns out that the JavaScript we were using couldn’t be executed in SFSafariViewController. We did some work on our end to address this issue and also reported it to Apple. Then, we waited.

Patience is a virtue

A Very Rad Holiday

One day in late October, while I was on vacation in a place where Internet access was scarce, Slack exploded with mentions from my colleagues about 1Password automatically working in many new apps when using the new iOS 9.2 beta. There I was, with an Internet connection barely good enough to check my email, and with no way to download the new iOS and Xcode beta goodies. All I could do was wait. And wait. And wait. It was the first time I ever wished that my vacation would end sooner!

Yay! Thank you, Apple!

Finally I returned home and was able to verify the amazing news: the 1Password App Extension API will simply appear in all Safari View Controllers in any app! After spending weeks working on this, I was ready to buy everyone at Apple a beer.

Let’s have a look at how this actually works. In the following example, you can see how easy it is to use 1Password to add your account to Tweetbot, one of the most popular Twitter clients.

What’s even more awesome is that Paul (the developer of Tweetbot) didn’t need to do anything to enable this feature. It just works! If you are an app developer, users of your app simply have to make sure that the 1Password App Extension is enabled.

To enable 1Password in apps, simply set up 1Password. It will then appear as an option on the share sheet, where it can be toggled on and rearranged. For illustrated, step-by-step instructions, please see our user guide.

1Password ❤ App Developers

The 1Password App Extension offers iOS app developers the opportunity to provide a simple and secure login experience. If your favourite iOS app prompts you to log in and doesn’t display the 1Password icon, reach out to the developer and direct them to our Dev Outreach page. They’ll be amazed by how easy it is to integrate 1Password into their app.

If you’re a developer and have already added the 1Password app extension to your iOS app, thank you; you’re awesome! Please don’t forget to submit your app to our Apps ❤ 1Password directory.

1Password developer newsletter

iOS app developers are invited to subscribe to our 1Password App Extension Developers newsletter. We’ll send you an occasional newsletter containing 1Password App Extension news, updates, and tricks, to help you realize the full potential of the 1Password Extension API in your iOS apps.

If you have any questions, you can comment on our GitHub project or email support+appex@agilebits.com. I look forward to talking to you!

Synapse and 1Password’s new brain

Filling is clearly one of the most important features in 1Password.  I know, I know, security is super important too … it protects our data from prying eyes and provides some very valuable peace of mind. But day to day, it is the convenience of being able to fill those long, randomly generated strings of gibberish into various sign-in pages that makes 1Password truly awesome. I’d love to say 1Password’s encryption is my favourite feature, but I’d be lying. When it comes down to it, I just don’t want to have to type my passwords. Ever.

So we rely on the 1Password extension to put those complex passwords where they belong to log us in to websites, pop our credit card details into online shopping forms, and provide our identity details for all those fun new services we can’t wait to try out.

Unfortunately, every now and then we run into a website that just doesn’t seem to want to play nice with 1Password’s current filling algorithms for one reason or another. Believe me, our intrepid filling gurus have performed some complicated code gymnastics to convince the existing extensions to fill forms on these less-than-standard websites. As 1Password sought to tackle more complex login screens, it became more and more challenging to write new solutions in and around the existing codebase.

So, in the 5.3 update for 1Password for Mac, our developers decided the best solution was a complete brain transplant for the extension.

1Password’s new brain

Version 5.3 of 1Password for iOS and version 5.3 of 1Password for Mac have now been released with this brand new brain, and Windows and Android users will see updates soon that take advantage of 1Password’s new smarts as well.  This new brain will provide filling that is more consistent across all of the platforms that we offer 1Password on, with more flexible algorithms that can be used on multiple websites, and easier-to-code solutions for those ‘unique’ sign in pages.

What’s improved here?

The browser extension is now a lot smarter at capturing user information on non-standard websites when a new Login is saved. And you may not notice this on your end, but many sites that previously required some of those complicated code gymnastics filling workarounds now fill smoothly – which makes the codebase a much nicer place for our team to play. Starting in version 5.3, you will see an improvement in Credit Card and Identity filling, particularly with respect to the filling of expiry dates. In addition, our gallant gurus have finally managed to slay a particularly troublesome dragon of a website: Citibank saving and filling will now work seamlessly across all login pages! Go on, re-save your Citibank Login to test … I know you want to.  :)

Even more awesome than the changes that are already introduced is the framework that our developers have built here. We’ve got a great foundation for future improvements … and our team is already working on slaying more dragons.

Synapse

Not only is 1Password’s new brain better, stronger, faster, AND more fill-ier than ever, but it ALSO comes with an awesome new reporting feature that will allow users to let us know when 1Password isn’t filling properly – from right within the app! Not only does this feature save you the effort of having to post in the forums or email in to tell us when filling isn’t working, but it quickly gets developers the information that they need, and provides a way for us to communicate fixes and workarounds to you. It’s all-around awesome.

So, what is Synapse?

Synapse is a brand new tool that lets customers report broken filling on websites directly through 1Password. Synapse will automatically gather the information about the site that developers need to quickly diagnose (and fix) the problem.  Now, that’s a great improvement for our team, but Synapse is also something for you to get excited about, because beyond making it easy to let us know when something’s not right, this tool will also advise you of any known workarounds (or the fix version) when you report a site that we’re already working on.

How can users report?

report_website_issueOur Knowledgebase has an article that can tell you all about this awesome new feature. But it’s easy to find, right in the extension’s menu!

What information does Synapse gather?

First and foremost: Synapse does nothing without your explicit consent. No information is gathered until you click the ‘submit’ button when reporting a website.

Because Synapse is an information-gathering tool, we want to be very clear about what information we are receiving when you report a website. As always, we take your privacy very seriously. And with Synapse, we take every effort to prevent sensitive information from being collected. Usernames, passwords, and other secure details are not included in the report which is sent to us. We’re also careful to mask any kind of information that could possibly identify you.

screen_shot_2015-04-09_at_11.08.59_am

Here’s what Synapse does collect:

  • The platform you are using. Currently this feature is implemented in 1Password for Mac (introduced in version 5.3), and the beta version of 1Password for Windows. We’d love to expand this feature to our mobile platforms in the future, if possible.
  • 1Password’s version number.
  • The version number of the browser extension.
  • Which browser is being used (Safari, Chrome, Firefox, or Opera).
  • The browser’s user agent.
  • The browser’s bundle identifier.
  • The URL of the site that is misbehaving.
  • The item’s Category type: whether you are attempting to fill a Login, Identity, Credit Card, or Password item.
  • Where the item was created: sometimes a Login created in the main app can behave differently than an item that was saved directly from the extension.
  • The date the item was created.
  • The date the item was last updated.
  • Any additional comments you might choose to share.

How does this make life easier for us all?

On the development end of things, Synapse gives developers a lovely aggregated list of the reported sites, which easily identifies the top issues and lets the team focus on fixing the issues that are most important to you. In addition to easy prioritization, developers have a ton of useful information to help track down the issue … without even needing to request it. Not only does this save time for our developers, but it also saves you from having to hunt down these details, which are not always easy to find! We think it’s a win-win situation.

Synapse also provides us a way to easily notify you when progress has been made on the issues you report. When you report an issue in Synapse, you’ll see an option to provide us with your email address. Sharing your email address means that our team can contact you if they need any more information about the issue that you reported. But, more importantly, it also means that we have a way to let you know when we have a workaround, or, even better, a proper resolution to the issue.

What else will you see when you report an issue with Synapse?

When you report an issue with Synapse, you’ll also be advised of any existing workarounds for the issue and be able to vote on if the workaround was successful for you, which provides us with some valuable feedback.  If our developers have already fixed the issue for a future update, you’ll see that notice as well.

Basically, what it comes down to is a pretty awesome update for those of us who rely on 1Password’s filling magic. 1Password’s filling is stronger and more ready to take on those uniquely designed websites, and with Synapse you can easily tell us when something’s not working and give the developers the details they need to fix it quickly.

Let us know what you think about Synapse and 1Password’s new brain in the comments, or in our forums.

Check out the first apps to support our 1Password App Extension for iOS 8!

Just in time for iOS 8, 1Password 5 for iOS has been unleashed in all its Touch ID, ready-for-iPhone-6-Plus glory. It also supports iOS 8’s brand new App Extensions feature, which means over 100 developers (and counting!) are building support directly into their apps for our 1Password App Extension, allowing you to unlock your vault with Touch ID, log in with a tap, and even update your app passwords!

In fact a number of developers shipped their 1Password-slinging updates alongside iOS 8 too, from a bank to community favorite apps for reading and work collaboration. Here’s our first rundown of the available 1Password-endowed apps so far, and keep an eye on our Apps that Love 1Password page for a major redesign soon!

Simple

Simple is a new kind of bank. It has no overdraft, minimums, or monthly fees, and it actually gives you great tools for savings and managing financial goals. Support is powered by human beings you can contact right inside this iPhone app, and you can instantly transfer money to (and from!) friends.

Simple integrated our 1Password extension so you can unlock your vault with Touch ID right inside the app and log into your account with a single tap. You can get Simple 2.1 with 1Password integration in the App Store now.

Slack

Slack is changing the way teams communicate. It’s real-time messaging for iPhone, iPad, and the web, combined with file storage and integrated with tools that teams are already using: Dropbox, Asana, Google+ Hangouts, Twitter, Zendesk, and many more. Conversations and files are archived, indexed, and instantly synced across multiple devices, making everything accessible through one simple search box.

You can find out more about Slack on its website, and get it on the App Store to see how Slack could help you be more productive and less busy.

Instapaper

Instapaper is the read-later service that lets you save anything and read it anywhere. You can save articles and other things on the web from any device, then grab this iPhone and iPad app to read those things later, even while offline.

Among plenty of other great new features, the new Instapaper added the 1Password extension so you can use Touch ID and log into your account with a single tap. You can pick up Instapaper 6.0 now in the App Store.

Retro

Retro is a beautiful Instagram browsing app for iPad. It supports multiple accounts, a Today widget for a quick glance at your feed, multiple themes, background updates, and much more.

With its latest update, Retro also gained the 1Password extension for that sweet Touch ID unlocking action and one-tap logging in. You can get Retro 2.2.1 for Instagram in the App Store.

InBrowser – Private Browsing

InBrowser is a web browser for iPhone and iPad with privacy at its heart. In fact, everything will be erased every time you exit InBrowser, including history, cookies, and sessions. You also get tabbed browsing, browser agent cloaking to avoid mobile sites, AirPlay, and more.

Considering InBrowser’s focus on privacy, it’s a good thing the latest version gained the 1Password extension. Now you can unlock your 1Password vault right inside InBrowser with Touch ID, log in with a tap, and leave no trace when you’re done. You can get InBrowser 1.55 in the App Store now.

Treehouse

Treehouse for iPad is “the best way to learn technology.” You can learn to build everything from websites to iPhone apps to web apps, or even to start a business. Over 1,000 videos, quizzes, and interactive code quizzes help you to learn and retain your new skills.

For its big upgrade, Treehouse now includes the 1Password extension so you can unlock your vault with Touch ID and log into your account with a single tap, or sign up for a new account with our Strong Password Generator! You can get learning with Treehouse 2 now in the App Store.

Paste+

 

Paste+ for iPhone is an interesting new breed of iOS 8 apps in that it is primarily a Today widget, and a useful one at that. When you copy something to your clipboard, Paste+ has lots of quick one-tap actions you can take with that thing, such as search it in Google, upload to Dropbox, share to social media and messaging, create reminders, make calls, and much more.

We’re thrilled to see that, for its 1.0 debut, Paste+ included our 1Password extension for login prompts. When you need to authorize Paste+ to access Dropbox, Twitter, or other services, you can unlock your vault with Touch ID and use 1Password to log in with a single tap.

You can get the first-ever version of Paste+ in the App Store now.

1Password 5 for iOS how-to: Enable the extension for Safari and third-party apps

1P5 iOS App Extension sheet

1Password 5 for iOS is now available for iOS 8 and it. is. amazing. One of its best new features is an App Extension that lets you fill Logins directly in Safari and even third-party apps!

There’s just one thing you have to do: like all iOS 8 App Extensions, you have to manually enable the 1Password extension if you want to use it in Safari and other apps. It’s easy to do it, and we have a great support document that shows you how.

The simple version is that you just need to launch 1Password 5 first (and set it up if you never have), then tap the Action menu, scroll to the right of the actions list (the bottom one with black and white icons; Share extensions are on top), tap More, and enable it.

Then you can get on with filling Logins (and soon Identities and Credit Cards) right into Safari!

1Password 5 for iOS is here with App Extensions, Touch ID, new freemium price

1Password 4 for iOS icon

I can’t tell you how fired up we are about this release! I literally can’t because there is no tool that can measure excitement on this scale. Years in the making, 1Password 5 is rolling out to the App Store with iOS 8’s best features at its heart, and now it’s free so everyone can save time and get secure online. All Pro features are free to existing v4 owners, and new customers can now get started for free.

By the way, if you sync with iCloud, please see this document about requirements and how best to upgrade.

The new 1Password 5 for iPhone and iPad now requires iOS 8 and is packed with some of our (and your!) best ideas ever:

  • App Extensions – Use 1Password to log into a growing list of your favorite apps and even update your passwords—all with just a tap!
  • Safari + 1Password – You read that right. Just like our in-app 1Browser, you can now fill 1Password Logins directly within Safari! Ooh, speaking of thumbs…
  • Unlock with Touch ID – After unlocking with your Master Password, get back into your vault in 1Password, Safari, and your favorite apps with just your thumb on devices with Touch ID. Check Settings > Security to learn how this works and pick your auto-lock time.
  • Sync now goes to 11 – We rebuilt iCloud sync using Apple’s new CloudKit and it is awesome. Wi-Fi Sync will be automatic and sync attachments with the forthcoming 1Password 5 for Mac, and it’s just plain also awesomer.
  • Adaptive UI – Whether you’re on an iPhone 4S, iPad Air, or a brand new iPhone 6 Plus, 1Password’s interface is dressed for the occasion.
  • So much more – Resume editing items after unlocking 1Password. A brand new Welcome Aboard process makes it even easier to set sail with 1Password. Backup restoration has you covered. And all that is just page one.

Oh, did we mention free?

I have good news and great news.

The good news

1Password 5 for iOS and all Pro features (yep, you read that right!) are a free upgrade to all existing 1Password 4 for iOS customers (reminder: 1Password 5 requires iOS 8).

The great news

1Password 5 for iOS and its core features are now free for everyone to use. We believe every man, woman, and child needs to save time and get secure online. This release is another big step towards making that dream reality.

The free edition can create Logins, Identities, Credit Cards, and Secure Notes, and use those items in Safari and other apps. It can also sync with 1Password for Mac, Windows, and Android.

Introducing Pro features

For a one-time in-app purchase in version 5, Pro features unlock the full power of 1Password 5 for iOS. You can:

  • Create the full range of items including Bank Accounts, Email Accounts, Memberships, Passports, Reward Programs, Wireless Routers, Software Licenses, and many more.
  • Organize your items with folders and tags.
  • Create and add Multiple Vaults.
  • Add custom fields to all items.
  • Support a great company with world-class human-powered customer service that loves you. Yes, including you.

Told you we were excited

We’ve been working towards this day for years and some of us are literally bouncing off our Toronto office walls with joy. We hope you love the new 1Password as much as we do, and now all our friends, family, and coworkers have even more great reasons to use it.

Please let us know what you think on Twitter @1Password, Facebook, and our forum, and join our newsletter so we can stay in touch with you!