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1Password 6.5 for Mac: Fantastic Secrets and Where to Find Them

These past few months we’ve been toiling like house elves on an incredibly new and awesome version of 1Password for Mac and I am happy to report it is available now.

As development on 1Password 6.5 was winding down Apple made an announcement that presented us with an incredible opportunity: The arrival of a magical new MacBook Pro with Touch Bar and Touch ID. We were there on day one with Touch ID support on iOS and maintaining that tradition on macOS was a no brainer.

We have a lot of ground to cover in this marvellous story so open your textbooks to page 394 and let’s read on, shall we?

Unlocking with your fingerprint is as easy as swish and flick

So how about that new Touch ID support? There’s no need to utter any incantations to magically unlock 1Password with your fingerprint. Just enable the Touch ID setting in Security Preferences and you’ll be good to go.

Those of us with the new MacBook Pro here at AgileBits have been known to quietly whisper “Alohamora” under our breath as we perform this charm, and quite frankly, we recommend you do the same.

wizard-card

But Touch ID support is just the collectible wizard card that comes with the chocolate frog that is our massive 6.5 release.

Practice your wandless magic

Touch ID isn’t the only new piece of magic to which we’ve hitched our broomstick. The new Touch Bar is almost as awesome as picking up the latest offering at Weasley’s Wizard Wheezes (but without the fear factor).

We’ve only just begun to take advantage of all the cool capabilities the Touch Bar makes possible, and already it has improved the way we use 1Password every day. For me it’s a toss up between the beautiful menu of categories that appears when I create a new item or being able to switch vaults with a tap.

touch-bar

Other incantations you can conjure with the Touch Bar include:

  • Adding a new item
  • Choosing the category in which you want to create an item
  • Locking your vault easier than casting the “Colloportus” spell
  • Activating search (to find the game-winning golden snitch, of course)

All aboard on Platform 9 3/4!

Of all the work that went into this new version, I want to highlight a piece that many of you may never see. That piece is a brand new first-run experience that anyone setting up 1Password for the first time will encounter.

new-first-run
Setting up 1Password for the first time on a new Mac is now just like that first swig of Butterbeer: warm, inviting, and deliciously sweet! We’ve completely rewritten this experience from the ground up. You can now create a brand new 1Password account directly inside the app so it’s easier than ever to get up and running.

Accio your items from anywhere

Accio your items with Alfred and LaunchBar!
Speaking of 1Password.com, one of things we’ve all missed was the inability to access our 1Password.com items from our favorite productivity tools like Alfred and LaunchBar. For version 6.5 we worked closely with the fine folks at both Alfred and LaunchBar to correct this egregious shortcoming. As of this writing Alfred has released an update for this new integration and LaunchBar has an update coming soon!

More goodies than Bertie Bott’s has flavours!

1Password 6.5 truly is an enormous release, packed with over 100 new features, improvements, and fixes. Here’s the full list for your studies. Be sure to pay close attention to all these Bits and Botts as they may appear on your upcoming Ordinary Wizarding Level Examinations.

New

  • 1Password can now be unlocked with your fingerprint on the new Touch ID-capable MacBook Pro.
  • Touch Bar support has landed! While using 1Password you will see enhanced controls in the Touch Bar on your new MacBook Pro.
  • 1Password has a whole new first-run experience! Setting up 1Password has never been easier. {OPM-4200}
  • You can now scan 1Password Account codes using the FaceTime HD camera on your Mac!
  • 1Password can now fill additional text, email, and password fields for items created outside the browser extension. {BRAIN-111}
  • 1Password will now ask you to migrate items from your Primary vault to newly added Personal vaults when adding a 1Password.com Account. {OPM-4240}
  • 1Password will now offer to automatically add any 1Password.com account to 1Password for Mac after signing into that account in your web browser. {OPM-4236}
  • Added the ability to copy 1Password Documents across 1Password.com accounts. {OPM-3974}
  • Added a Download Local Copy item to the context menu for Document items. {OPM-3939}
  • Added the ability to manage your 1Password account subscription within the app (AgileBits Store Only). {OPM-4249}

Improved

  • Improved filling of credit card expiration dates. {BRAIN-138}
  • Updated our translations with the latest from our incredible translators on Crowdin.
  • Renamed the Start Over menu item to Reset All 1Password Data. {OPM-4069}
  • 1Password mini’s menu width is automatically resized to fit long browser extension names. {OPM-4112}
  • After migrating to a 1Password.com account, the new account vault becomes the default vault for saving. {OPM-4534}
  • Improved the wording in Add Account preferences. {OPM-4444}
  • Improved wording in Accounts Preferences regarding 1Password.com Accounts. {OPM-4306}
  • Improved handling of sync when Folder Syncing to a removable disk. {OPM-4414}\
  • Updated to the latest 1Password brain for improved Login saving and form filling.
  • 1Password is now better at avoiding “search” and “newsletter” forms when filling. {BRAIN-289}
  • 1Password is now better at saving Logins on pages with search fields. {BRAIN-274}
  • 1Password is now better at avoiding search fields on Russian and German websites. {BRAIN-293}
  • 1Password is now better at handling sneaky password fields on Swedish websites. {BRAIN-310}
  • Improved the wording of the macOS authentication prompt. {OPM-3768}
  • We now enter edit mode after converting a Password to a Login. {OPM-4284}
  • Updated the password generator minimum and maximum values. {OPM-4409}
  • Added mechanisms for strengthening communication with 1Password.com.
  • Improved the parsing for certain improperly formatted web addresses. {OPM-4281}
  • Improved network efficiency with 1Password.com accounts {OPM-4290}
  • Added a notification to update to the latest 1Password version when features aren’t compatible with the 1Password.com Account server. {OPM-4177}
  • Changed naming of Wi-Fi sync to WLAN sync. {OPM-3851}
  • Empty address fields are now hidden when viewing items. {OPM-3902}
  • Updated the way 1Password determines which URLs to match in the extension. {OPM-4078}
  • When merging vaults during sync setup the password hint is no longer truncated if it’s too long. {OPM-4053}
  • Removed some potentially offensive words that were present in the word list for our Word-based Strong Password Generator. {OPI-3129}
  • The error message for when 1Password mini is quarantined by the system is now less mysterious. {OPM-4102}
  • Added a hover button and Voice Over support to item attachments. {OPM-624}
  • Removed several instances where 1Password for Teams or 1Password for Families language was used and replaced with 1Password Account.
  • Made numerous improvements to the way text is handled throughout the app to make translation easier.
  • Improved WLAN sync error handling. {OPI-3314}
  • Personal and Shared vaults will now display the user or team avatars if they don’t have their own avatar. {OPM-4032}
  • Improved the first run experience when using onepassword://team-account links. {OPM-4019, OPM-3905}
  • Improved the custom icon display for 1Password.com account items in the main 1Password app. {OPM-4125}
  • Improved the experience when deleting the last 1Password.com account when no local vaults exist. {OPM-4033}
  • Decreased the delay in uploading custom icons for Teams and Families vaults. {OPM-4124}
  • The account details preference pane now shows when you’re in trial mode. {OPM-4562}

Fixed

  • Fixed the layout of the Start Over dialog so that it worked better with more verbose languages. {OPM-4167}
  • Fixed an issue where custom icons would not upload to 1Password.com accounts. {OPM-4049}
  • Fixed an issue where vault switching in mini was not instantly mirrored in the main app if it was in the background. {OPM-3523}
  • Fixed a bug that could cause instability in the Preferences window. {OPM-3983}
  • Fixed a bug when removing an attachment file before saving the item with the attachment. {OPM-4057}
  • Fixed an issue that caused Reset iCloud Data to be enabled even though there weren’t any local vaults. {OPM-4104}
  • Fixed an issue that caused problems with VoiceOver navigating password values. {OPM-3343}
  • Fixed an issue that caused category sorting in All Vaults to not sort properly when only non-1Password Account vaults were present. {OPM-4131}
  • Fixed an issue that would cause WLAN sync to not activate after unlocking 1Password for Mac. {OPM-4129}
  • The anchored Large Type window no longer crops off the top of characters in a long password. {OPM-4135}
  • The tab key now cycles through fields properly again when editing an item. {OPM-4083}
  • Fixed an issue where some unrecognized data in an item would be lost while saving. {OPM-4234}
  • Fixed autosubmit on fideliti.co.uk. {BRAIN-268}
  • Fixed a layout issue in macOS Sierra when choosing fields while exporting CSV or tab-delimited files. {OPM_4241}
  • Fixed a layout issue with the Password Generator on macOS Sierra. {OPM-4304}
  • Fixed the multi-line height calculation for notes and tags in macOS Sierra. {OPM-4297}
  • Obliterated a hang that could be caused by Documents with missing metadata.
  • Fixed a rare crash when scanning a QR code when creating a one-time password or adding a 1Password.com account. {OPM-4351}
  • Fixed instance where logging into 1Password.com may not offer to add that account to 1Password when using Bartender. {OPM-4435}
  • Resolved a logic flaw that would result in a failure to properly load localized category names on macOS 10.12 {OPM-4433}
  • Fixed a crash that could happen when using custom icons. {OPM-4423}
  • Fixed a minor button alignment issue in account sign in setup screen. {OPM-4481}
  • Fixed issues introduced in a previous beta causing setup screen animations to fail in macOS 10.10 and 10.11 {OPM-4476, OPM-4477}
  • Fixed a crash that could occur when right clicking on 1Password mini. {OPM-4552}
  • Fixed a crash that could occur when scanning a QR Code for a TOTP field. {OPM-4500}
  • Resolved a height issue with the dialog window that appeared when enabling local vaults in the Preferences window. {OPM-4390}
  • Fixed a rare crash when syncing with iCloud. {OPM-4328}
  • 1Password would fail to fill sites that had previously saved fields 1Password ignores during filling. {BRAIN-299}
  • Fixed an issue where certain Favorites could cause issues while syncing with 1Password.com accounts. {OPM-4402}
  • Fixed a bug in the item selection logic. {OPM-4417}
  • Fixed an issue that could cause 1Password mini to hang while copying large numbers of items across vaults. {OPM-4395}
  • Fixed a crash that could occur during sync via AgileKeychain. {OPI-3713}
  • Fixed an issue preventing two my.1password.com accounts from being added at one time. {OPM-4312}
  • Fixed an issue that would cause 1Password to authenticate twice with 1Password.com upon startup instead of just once. {OPM-4286}
  • Fixed an issue that caused broken custom icons. {OPM-4314}
  • Fixed an issue that could create a username conflict when manually saving a login on some sites. {OPM-4156}
  • Fixed an issue where item counts were being squished on macOS Sierra. {OPM-4228}
  • Fixed an issue that caused problems reading scanned QR Codes. {OPM-4322}
  • Fixed a crash that could happen when removing the Primary vault on OS X 10.10 Yosemite. {OPM-4309}
  • Fixed a crash that could occur when disabling vaults outside of 1Password accounts. {OPM-4273}
  • Fixed the Large Type window so that it stays on screen after being anchored by dragging it. {OPM-4152}
  • Fixed an issue where the verify code signature setting wasn’t being consulted when 1Password was locked. {OPM-4165, OPM-4178}
  • Login filling failed on tecmarket.it. {BRAIN-254}
  • Resolved an issue where 1Password would incorrectly identify the designated username and password field when saving a Login. {BRAIN-207}
  • Resolved an issue where 1Password would fill credit card month value into quantity fields when the field was of number type.
  • Resolved an issue where 1Password would attempt to fill into disabled or read-only fields. {BRAIN-263}
  • Radio buttons were being improperly saved and restored. (Existing Logins will need to be resaved.) {BRAIN-74}
  • 1Password would not fill the same password value into more than one field. {BRAIN-83, BRAIN-84}
  • Fixed an issue that caused a crash when using the Strong Password Generator. {OPM-3676, OPM-4218}
  • Fixed issues that could occur while using your browser during 1Password’s setup {OPM-4565, OPM4569}
  • Fixed an issue where animations could get stacked and cause unintended view layout in the Setup and QR scanner windows. {OPM-4571}
  • Fixed an issue that prevented tabbing among the buttons in the Setup window. {OPM-4566}
  • Fixed a spacing issue with the Preferences window when viewing the security preferences with a 1Password.com account vault selected. {OPM-4570}
  • Fixed a crash with the QR scanning window in the Mac App Store version. {OPM-4572}
  • Fixed a crash when trying to unlock from the browser extension when still in setup mode. {OPM-4333}

This was an incredible release and we hope you love it as much as we loved creating it. So long for now and good luck on your Owls!

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Having fun with Touch ID and the Touch Bar in 1Password

Yesterday was the special Apple event and all activity at AgileBits stopped as our entire team watched the live stream to see what goodies would be coming our way. For me, the most exciting news by far was the announcement of the new MacBook Pro with its amazing Touch Bar and Touch ID.

I remember how excited I was at the Apple developers conference when they first added Touch ID to iOS 8. I rushed back to the hotel, Xcode beta in hand, and added Touch ID to 1Password that very night. The joy of seeing 1Password unlock with just a tap was overwhelming.

Well, here I am again with that exact same feeling 🙂

Now that the new MacBook Pro’s have Touch ID we can bring that same great feeling you are used to on iPhone to your Mac, and it looks pretty darn cool too. Take a look for yourself and see!

As stunning as it looks in the Xcode simulator on my soon-to-be-obsolete late 2013, 15” 2.3 GHz Retina MacBook Pro, I can’t wait until my new Mac arrives so I can use it for real.

Oh, and then there’s the new Touch Bar. Wow! I was really excited seeing Phil demo this. The Touch Bar introduces a brand new world to the Mac and with it comes some wonderful opportunities to make 1Password even better. Dan, our designer extraordinaire, has begun to explore what the Touch Bar can bring to 1Password and I’d like to share some early designs.

Touch Bar for 1Password

What Dan has come up with is really exciting and I can’t wait to play with it. I think that switching between my work and home vaults with just a tap is going to be the most awesome, albeit sliding my finger across the Touch Bar to generate a strong password comes in a close second.

The possibilities with the Touch Bar are limitless and I am excited to hear how you see yourself using the new Touch Bar with 1Password.

Please share your thoughts in the comments below ❤️

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Chatting the Snaps at WWDC

What an exciting time it is in the world of Apple! My name is Connor; I’m what my colleagues like to call the “Millennial in Residence” on the AgileBits team, and I spend most of my time doing development and support for 1Password for iOS. Some of my team members and I were lucky enough to make the trip out to San Francisco recently to attend Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference, otherwise known as WWDC. We spent the week watching presentations, participating in labs, and planning all the exciting things that are on the horizon for our iOS and Mac apps.

My trip started in the early hours of Sunday morning in Toronto’s Pearson airport, where I took the five-hour flight to San Francisco. From there, I was whisked by BART into downtown where I quickly checked in to my hotel and made my way to the Moscone Convention Center to begin the week. I was lucky this year to win Apple’s WWDC Scholarship, which got me a ticket to the conference and a chance to participate in some student-specific activities throughout the week. The first thing on the agenda was student orientation, where Apple presenters gave us their thoughts on what makes an app “great” and some amazing stories of how their lives led them to a coveted position at Apple. We then gathered for a giant group picture—there were 350 of us! The illustrious Tim Cook even joined us to take selfies and sign our badges (talk about an amazing souvenir).

Monday morning brought with it the ever-exciting keynote presentation, where Tim and his team of executives took the stage to introduce all of the hard work they’ve been doing during the past year. We saw some great updates to all of Apple’s operating systems, including watchOS, tvOS, iOS, and the newly renamed macOS Sierra. We saw how Apple is continuing to make its platforms work hand-in-hand with features like shared clipboard, Siri on the Mac, proximity unlock for Apple Watch, and many other awesome improvements. They also gave us some great improvements to 3D Touch which I am personally very excited about. The team and I were inside the Bill Graham public auditorium with several thousand other developers and members of the press as these announcements were made, and I can tell you that the energy in that room was incredible, especially since it was my first time experiencing an Apple keynote.

The ‪1Password‬ crew has our seats for today’s WWDC keynote!

A photo posted by Michael Fey (@mrrooni) on

I spent the rest of the week in what Apple calls the labs: expansive areas covering most of Moscone’s first floor, dedicated to Apple engineers helping developers like me in one-on-one (and often fairly lengthy – thanks Alex!) sessions. I got the chance to improve my code, familiarize myself with new frameworks and language updates, and of course give feedback to the very engineers that built the tools we use every day. We also got an in-depth look at those new development tools; an extra helpful Xcode engineer even helped me with a build configuration problem that would have had me running in circles for the entire afternoon.

Many of us engaged in various “skunkworks” projects, where we took some of Apple’s new frameworks and attempted to bend them to our will in 1Password. While I can’t make any promises that they’ll ever see the light of day, I will say that we were very intrigued by the possibilities created by iMessage apps, Home screen widgets, and watchOS 3. It was also great for us to run the current version of 1Password on the developer preview builds of iOS 10 and macOS Sierra. I’m happy to report that it runs well! I also attended awesome talks by Apple engineers about advancements they’ve made in watchOS, the UIKit framework, and the Swift language. I learned more during the conference than I could even process at the time, so I’m glad I took notes throughout the week :)

It was also great for us to run the current version of 1Password on the developer preview builds of iOS 10 and macOS Sierra. I’m happy to report that it runs well!

The other hugely important, exciting, and just plain fun aspect of “Dub Dub” was the chance to meet dozens of people who use the software we write. I had so many people walk up to me and ask about the various 1Password shirts I wore through the week.

Chatting the Snaps at WWDC 2016

Everyone I met was super friendly and had things to say about 1Password that really warmed my heart, like, “I’ve been using 1Password since my very first Mac,” or, “This is the first app I download every time I get a new phone.” Things like that are why my team and I work so hard to make 1Password great. We know that you really rely on it every day, and it was a truly humbling experience to talk to so many of you in person.

All in all, it was an amazing week. From teaching my cough more age-abundant co-workers how to use Snapchat (or in their words, how to “chat the snaps”), to the wonderful people we met, to the great new tools and products that Apple unveiled, it was an incredible experience for the entire 1Password team.

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1Password 6.3 for Mac: The Passion Project

Spring has sprung and passion is in the air. The birds are feeling it, the bees are feeling it, we’re feeling it and so are you! We have heard your passionate pleas for some key improvements and we are overjoyed to share the results with you in our latest update to 1Password for Mac, version 6.3.

New browser support

Like many of you, we love trying out new browsers, but we are lost without our 1Password browser extensions. That’s why we added support for three more browsers in version 6.3: Vivaldi, Brave and Opera developer. Vivaldi aims to be the most customizable of browsers (and is it ever!), Brave is focused on security and privacy and Opera developer is for those who love to live on the edge. These browsers are now verified by 1Password, enabling you to log in to any website safely and securely.

Large Type

Did you know that you can embiggen your passwords? We introduced Large Type in 1Password 5.4 and it immediately became one of your favorite features. Among your love notes and thank-yous were some enthusiastic pleas to let the Large Type window be anchored so that you can click elsewhere without it disappearing. Now you can! Simply drag the window and it will become an anchored window that won’t disappear until you close it or lock your vault.

1Password 6.3 for Mac: Anchor the Large Type window

VoiceOver

Accessibility is important to us and VoiceOver support is a key tool in making 1Password more accessible to more users. 1Password 6.3 is now easier to navigate when using VoiceOver, especially when moving between the sidebar, item list, and item details. We have also made similar improvements to 1Password mini.

These are just some of the features in our latest release, but there are so many more. If you’d like to see the whole list of improvements, check out our full release notes.

What do you think of today’s update? Please share your thoughts with us in the comments or start a conversation with us in our discussion forums. We also invite you to reach out to us on Twitter or Facebook.

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1Password 6.2 for Mac: The New Tricks Edition

You know what they say. “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but you can teach password managers new things.” I don’t know about old dogs, but 1Password has definitely learned some new tricks over the years. There have been dozens of new versions, hundreds of betas, and approximately a gazillion improvements! That’s a lot of changes, and we’re not about to stop now. Welcome to 1Password 6.2 for Mac: The New Tricks Edition.

A bigger brain

1Password logo: brain

One of the most magical things about 1Password is the handy-dandy browser extension, which automatically saves your passwords. It’s also the way 1Password knows how to fill in your information on sites asking for your shipping information or credit card number.

The extension is powered by what we call the brain, and boy has it been doing its homework lately. It studied numerous websites, drank some ginseng-infused green tea, and now is ready to fill your information on any website you throw at it. When you save a new Login, the brain will also take a stab at filling in a good title for you.

First-class importing

We’ve made 1Password a lot more versatile and accessible in recent months. We’ve had beautiful updates to 1Password for Android, iOS, and Mac. We announced 1Password for Teams and 1Password Families. We also have 1Password beta for Windows 10 in the Windows Store. This is the best time for you, your businesses, and your loved ones to join our 1Password family.

1Password 6.2 for Mac: Import Wizard

We wanted to make switching to 1Password a breeze, so we took another look to make sure importing data was simple. If you’re joining us from another app, jump right in—the water’s fine and the sailing’s smooth!

The whole bag o’ tricks

These are the two big new features available in 1Password for Mac, but that’s not all we have for you! This release features dozens of other improvements. We’ve made 1Password mini faster and play better with multiple active Chrome profiles. Plus, you can now restore existing data from iCloud when you’re setting up 1Password for Mac. If you’d like to learn about all of the changes in this update, take a gander at our full release notes.

What do you think of today’s update? Please share your thoughts with us in the comments or start a conversation with us in our discussion forums. We also invite you to reach out to us on Twitter or Facebook.

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1Password 6.1 for Mac: The Mini Delights Edition

From time to time, something most people overlook makes me really happy: pulling a perfect loaf of bread out of the oven, going for a run on a beautiful day, or writing a fantastic line of code. And sometimes, those small things happen close together and combine into something truly delightful. That’s what 1Password 6.1 is all about: little things that come together to make one great update.

Find the right Login

If you’re anything like me, you not only have a lot of Logins, you have many for the same site. We’ve made it easier to tell which Login is which when you’re using 1Password mini by displaying the Login’s username next to the title when you have duplicate titles.

mini-duplicate-title

1Password mini is also smarter when searching for words that contain accents or other diacritics. While watching the Oscars the other night, I was a little disappointed that The Revenant didn’t win Best Picture. I could at least send the director a consolation prize like a 1Password t-shirt or something (a more exclusive club, after all). I never remember how to exactly spell his last name though, I just remember that it starts with “Ina” with accents somewhere. 1Password makes it easy now, I can search without the accents and it’ll find it just fine.

mini-accents

Teams & Families

One of my favorite parts of 1Password for Teams is that Documents became first-class items. You can see a list of all Documents, and you can link as many items as you want to the same Document. In 1Password 6.1, Documents have become even better, as you can now add Notes and even custom fields, just like with other items. Want to store a password field to go along with that file? Go right ahead.

document-fields

Sync

Syncing your data across all of your devices is one of the greatest conveniences 1Password offers. As part of 1Password 6.1, we’ve rebuilt how syncing is scheduled at the core level. This means that sync now takes fewer resources, so that 1Password mini can be more responsive to the things you want to do.

We’ve also improved iCloud Sync in the AgileBits Store version of 1Password. It’s important to us that the iCloud experience in both versions our app is as good as we can make it.

Licensing

Setting up a new Mac is super exciting! That new Mac smell. swoon Then reality hits: all of those apps that you’re installing, they’re going to want licenses. Licenses that you’ll have to manually enter or drag and drop or double-click or whatever. We thought it would be amazing if we could make it a little bit easier for you to register 1Password for Mac, so 1Password 6.1 will recognize the license you previously saved in a Software License item. It will automatically register itself, without you needing to lift a finger.

1Password 6.1 for Mac: automatic licensing

Better Startup

In my last blog post, I mentioned steps we were going to take to improve the startup process of the 1Password app. 1Password is now a little smarter during startup, and it will do more to communicate with you about what’s going on. If something goes wrong, we’ve added ways for it to detect the problem and tell you about it.

And much more!

These are just a few of the changes we’ve been working on. 1Password 6.1 is available today for all users of the AgileBits Store version of the app, and has been submitted to the Mac App Store for review.

If you want to know all the details about this release, read the full release notes.

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Trouble with Mac App Store updates? We can help.

Last week we released 1Password version 6 for Mac on both our website and in the Mac App Store. Major version updates are always a little scary for us, but we were hopeful because our last update went so smoothly for our customers. This time? Not so much. A small percentage of our users are experiencing issues after updating 1Password via the Mac App Store.

Some of you dutifully updated and discovered that 1Password would not respond upon launching, eventually telling you that it failed to connect to 1Password mini. This is obviously no good. We know how important 1Password is to you, and we must do whatever is in our power to make sure this kind of thing doesn’t happen.

If you were affected by this, I’m really sorry.

Rebooting Helps… Even on OS X

The good news is that the fix is super easy: A reboot will likely resolve the issue. If it doesn’t, please email us at support@agilebits.com so that we can help you get up and running again as quickly as possible.

mban4505_hi_1024

We don’t know why this just started happening in this release. We’ve had many updates over the last few years and this is the first time that we’ve seen this happen like this.

You may be wondering why rebooting helps. Historically OS X hasn’t been known for needing reboots to solve issues, so this advice may sound peculiar. Read on to learn why.

A Tale of Two Apps

Let’s go over what we think is going on with this update and why we believe the update has gone as poorly as it has, and what we’re going to try to do about it.

1Password for Mac consists of two apps, bundled together as one: 1Password (what we like to call the Main app) and 1Password mini, which lives in your menu bar. The Main app does very little on its own; it’s dependent on 1Password mini for everything, which is why it’s critical for the main app to be able to connect to mini on launch. The vast majority of users opt to have mini always running in the background, which is the recommended approach.

Unfortunately, the mechanism that 1Password uses to talk to 1Password mini isn’t quite perfect. Both apps are bundled together, and you would think that we could have 1Password tell the system that it’d like to communicate with the version of 1Password mini that’s bundled within itself. Instead, 1Password can only say, “I’d like to communicate with the app whose unique identifier is onepassword-helper.” The operating system will then find 1Password mini (whose unique identifier looks like onepassword-helper), and if it’s not launched already, the system will launch it. This works nicely almost all of the time.

It’s…Complicated

Often times, 1Password mini is running when the Mac App Store is updating 1Password. 1Password mini includes code to detect when it has been trashed, and when that happens it attempts to terminate itself. It understands that either an update is coming and old mini should make way for new mini, or that the user is uninstalling the app—in which case it should get out of their hair. From what I’ve seen so far, it looks like this code was failing. Either the Mac App Store didn’t trash our app first, or we didn’t catch the event as we should, or we didn’t react as we should. What matters is that the old version of 1Password mini was still around.

Having an old mini running isn’t a big problem for you as a user. You’ll still be able to use mini just fine, and keep filling forms in your browser. The problems don’t start to appear until you run the main 1Password app. 1Password will ask the system to communicate with mini and the system will say “here’s a connection to [old] mini”. 1Password will say hello to mini and include a version number. 1Password mini is smart enough to compare the version numbers and refuse to communicate with a newer main app. What it should do in this situation is terminate itself. The operating system should then re-launch the new mini, and the main app should connect to it. It seems that in this case, the operating system continually relaunched the old mini, which put us into a loop.

So then why does rebooting help? Rebooting should cause the operating system to rebuild its list of apps on the system and forget that the old version of 1Password exists. It should then launch the new mini instead of the old and get us out of the loop.

Making It Better

This issue seems to have affected a small percentage of users, but that’s still more than we’re comfortable with. Let’s look at how we’re going to try to make this better in upcoming releases of 1Password for Mac.

Better Trash Detection

We have to do more research and understand why 1Password mini didn’t detect that it was going be upgraded and then terminate itself properly.

Better Communication With the User

As the 1Password main app was in this loop with the wrong mini, users were given no indication of what was going on. We need to do better here. 1Password should explain what’s going on to the user. Even just explaining that it’s attempting to connect to 1Password mini, and showing the countdown to giving up (60 seconds) would give some indication of what’s happening.

Better Detection of Multiple Instances of 1Password mini

In 1Password 5.4.3, we added code to detect multiple installations of 1Password during updates of our AgileBits Store version of 1Password. This greatly reduced the number of issues encountered while upgrading that version of the app. I think it’s time for us to run this kind of detection upon starting the main app, to catch these kinds of issues even before we ask the operating system to connect us to a mini.

We’re Here to Help

If ever you have trouble updating 1Password to a new version, or have any other kind of problem with the app, please reach out to us. We love hearing from you, and we’re here to help.

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1Password 6 for Mac is here!

[Update] 1Password 6 is now available in the Mac App Store. *squee*

It’s a new year and we’re starting things off on a strong note with a great new update to 1Password for Mac: Version 6.0! This latest version of everyone’s favorite password manager is looking better than ever, and we couldn’t have done it without you. Your awesome feature requests, suggestions, bug reports, and usage scenarios really helped us decide what to include in this release.

All Vaults view

All VaultsMultiple vaults is one of my favourite features in 1Password. It keeps all of my information neatly organized and shared with the right people. But, with a great number of vaults comes greater opportunity for (dis)organization. And with 1Password for Teams, odds are you have a lot more vaults than you did before!

With the new All Vaults view, you can see all of your items in the main app and in 1Password mini without switching vaults. Do you have a family vault set up for your parents? How about that Teams vault that holds all the business social accounts? You probably have vaults that you need to keep for reference but that you don’t want cluttering up your everyday view. The All Vaults view is customizable so you can choose which vaults you see there.

All Vaults preferencesSee all the information you want. See only the information you want.

Powered-Up Strong Password Generator

One of our most frequently requested features is here! 1Password 6 for Mac features a refined and simplified Strong Password Generator. If you use 1Password for iOS, you’ve already seen our fancy new wordlist password generator. Now you can take advantage of this feature on Mac as well. Choose the new Words option to create a password comprising random words chosen from a list approved by our Chief Defender Against the Dark Arts. Wordlist passwords are easy to remember and type, without sacrificing strength and security. If you prefer a jumble of letters, numbers, and symbols, the Characters option you know and love is still there for you.

Strong password generator

iCloud sync

Surprise! Thanks to some pretty significant changes Apple made recently, we are now able to offer iCloud sync to customers who bought 1Password for Mac directly from the AgileBits Store. As you probably know, this was previously only available to Mac App Store customers, and we’re super excited to be able to offer it to everyone.

You might be wondering how we’re able to do this. You can read all the details in our blog post. If you’re a Mac app developer, you’ll want to read it too! We have something special just for you. :D

If you own the AgileBits Store version of 1Password for Mac and are excited to set up iCloud sync RIGHT NOW, our User Guide will help you.

Access all your Teams vaults

If you’ve been waiting to sign up for 1Password for Teams Beta, now’s a great time.  You can easily add your team to 1Password 6 for Mac. It even has a Teams-only mode, so if you’ve never used 1Password before, it’s easier than ever to get started on your Mac.
Teams preferences

All this can be yours for the low low price of…

Zero! Zip! Zilch! We’re thrilled to say that 1Password 6 is a free update for all 1Password 4 and 1Password 5 for Mac owners.  If you already own a license for 1Password, you can check for updates from within 1Password to upgrade to version 6. The AgileBits Store version is available now, and we’ll hit the “Publish” button on the Mac App Store version just as soon as it’s approved!

If you want to know all the details about the shiny new awesome, read the full release notes.

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AgileCloudSDK: iCloud Sync Gets Its Wings

At the last WWDC, Apple announced some changes to CloudKit, the technology that enables an app to sync with iCloud. As many of you know, it was previously impossible for non-Mac App Store apps to sync with iCloud. The changes that Apple made to CloudKit have opened up some really exciting possibilities, and today, we’re happy to announce that we have been able to implement iCloud sync in the AgileBits Store version of 1Password.

1Password 6 for Mac Sync Preferences (iCloud)

Wait…what?

1Password uses the CloudKit API to sync your data with iCloud. In OS X 10.10 Yosemite, the CloudKit framework provided by Apple did all the heavy lifting by communicating with Apple’s servers for the app, but it was only available for apps that were codesigned by the Mac App Store. This meant that only the Mac App Store version of 1Password could sync with iCloud.

You can read more about this in the post that Roustem wrote last fall.

What’s changed?

CloudKit is still the way that developers access the iCloud database, but Apple has provided a brand new way of accessing their CloudKit servers: CloudKit web services. CloudKit web services allows apps to access CloudKit via a really nice web framework called CloudKit JS. When these changes were announced at WWDC, we were excited to start working with this new framework to see what possibilities it would present. Ultimately, CloudKit JS enabled us to support iCloud sync in our AgileBits Store version of 1Password.

[Update] If you are a Mac app developer, and would like to use AgileCloudSDK so that your app can sync with iCloud, your app must also be in the App Store. Your customers, however, will now be able to choose whichever version they want.

How did we do it?

To make sync as seamless and stable as possible we wanted to make very few changes to the existing sync code in 1Password. We felt the best way to do that was to make a framework that looks and acts like Apple’s native CloudKit framework, but uses the CloudKit web services. This means 1Password can use Apple’s native CloudKit framework in the Mac App Store version, and our new AgileCloudSDK framework in the AgileBits Store version.

There are a lot of internal differences between native CloudKit and CloudKit web services. CloudKit web services relies on JavaScript but native CloudKit uses Cocoa classes for data storage, so we knew that we couldn’t reuse the existing code without something to translate the requests and data back and forth.

In order to talk to Apple’s servers, we needed a mediator. Adam Wulf and I created a class that takes native CloudKit API calls, translates them to web service API calls, and translates the responses back to native Cocoa code. The 1Password sync code is now completely ignorant as to whether it’s connecting to native CloudKit or CloudKit web services. This means that 1Password can find your data in iCloud, whether you’re using the Mac App Store version or the AgileBits Store version. We’re extremely pleased with this outcome!

From our customers’ point of view, iCloud sync in the AgileBits Store version of 1Password will look a little bit different during the initial setup. CloudKit JS does not use the iCloud settings from OS X, so to authenticate with Apple, 1Password will prompt you to log in to your iCloud account by displaying the iCloud login page in your default web browser. Once you have logged in to your iCloud account, CloudKit web services sends an authentication token back to 1Password, which it then stores (securely, of course). This enables 1Password to sync with iCloud without having to reauthenticate each time. Since the iCloud login for CloudKit JS is completely separate from the iCloud settings in OS X System Preferences, you can even use a completely different iCloud account if you like!

1Password 6 for Mac iCloud auth

Share the knowledge

One of the challenges we faced when developing this framework was that no one else seemed to be working on this particular problem yet. We want AgileCloudSDK to continue to grow and improve and we can think of no better way to ensure that than to release it as open source. We are currently busy prepping it for release and plan to have more information (including a release date) soon. If you’re interested in learning more about this framework, reach out to us at support+agilecloudsdk@agilebits.com.

To everyone at Apple who worked hard to make this new functionality possible: thank you. You’re awesome.

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When a Leak Isn’t a Leak

Over the weekend Dale Myers wrote a blog post that examined our .agilekeychain format. The post featured a good discussion and analysis of our older data format, but it raised some questions among 1Password users and the wider technology community.

Dale states that he plans to continue using 1Password and has no concerns over the safety of his passwords themselves, but his main concern was how the AgileKeychain handles item URLs. While we widely documented this design decision and shared it publicly, Dale was surprised to find out that we didn’t encrypt URLs within the keychain. We want to reassure users that rely on AgileKeychain that their password data is safe and secure, and take the time to walk through our data formats to explain the issue completely.

AgileKeychain & OPVault Data Formats

Back in 2008, we introduced the AgileKeychain as a way to help our users better synchronize data across platforms and devices. At this time, 1Password had significantly less processing power to draw from for tasks like decryption, and doing something as simple as a login search would cause massive performance issues and battery drain for our users. Given the constraints that we faced at the time, we decided not to encrypt item URLs and Titles (which resembled the same sorts of information that could be found in browser bookmarks).

In December 2012, we introduced a new format that encrypted much more of the metadata. OPVault, our newer and stronger data format, provided authenticated encryption as well as many other improvements for 1Password users.

This format worked well in situations where we didn’t need to worry about backwards compatibility, including iCloud and local storage on iOS and Mac. For Windows, Android, and Dropbox syncing, however, we needed to decide if we should migrate to the new format or provide compatibility with older versions of 1Password.

We decided to take a conservative approach and not automatically migrate everyone over to OPVault because many users depend upon older versions of 1Password and they wouldn’t be able to log into their accounts. We knew we could trust the security of the AgileKeychain to protect confidential user data so we didn’t want to rush into something that would disrupt people’s workflows.

Switching to OPVault

Despite the security of AgileKeychain remaining intact, Dale reminded us that its time to move on. The OPVault format is really great in so many ways and we should start sharing it with as many users as possible.

We’ve already started making changes to use OPVault as the default format. In fact, the latest beta of 1Password for Windows does this already. Similar changes are coming to Mac and iOS soon, and we’re planning on using the new format in Android in the future. Once all of these things are complete, we will add an automatic migration for all 1Password users. For users who would like to switch to OPVault sooner than this, here’s how you can get started immediately:

To avoid losing access to your data, be sure to back up your 1Password data beforehand, and only follow these instructions if you are NOT using any legacy versions of 1Password. If you have any questions or concerns, or would like to migrate but aren’t sure if your version of 1Password is affected, our knowledgebase, forums and support team are here to help.