DevBits, featured image

Filling with 1Password for Android

1Password is all about bringing convenience to security. Of course, there are always challenges to overcome. On Android, one particular challenge we have been working on is how to make it both secure and convenient for you to use your login credentials. Until recently, your options for filling these credentials were limited to either using the 1Browser built into 1Password or using the clipboard to copy and paste.

While 1Browser helps you fill your login credentials into your favorite sites, it probably isn’t as fully featured as your favorite browser. 1Browser also isn’t much help when you want to use your login credentials to sign into an app. In these situations, you were previously limited to using copy and paste to get your login information out of 1Password and into that browser or app. Unfortunately, using the clipboard for this purpose is not at all convenient, and as we have mentioned before, not particularly secure.

Something better

When evaluating ways to provide a Login filling solution, we wanted to address the following concerns:

  • It needed to be more secure and more convenient than using the clipboard.
  • It needed to provide login filling for both third-party apps and browsers.

In order to make this happen, we needed to implement a service that could detect login fields when displayed in apps and browsers, and insert text directly into those fields. So, we split this functionality across two different services: the 1Password Automatic Filling service detects login fields and gives them focus when appropriate, while the 1Password Keyboard displays the interface for selecting the right Login and sends the credentials for that Login to the appropriate text fields.

Login detection

Twitter Login PageThe first step in filling your credentials is determining when there is a login form on screen that 1Password can fill into. To do this, we take advantage of the Accessibility APIs included in Android to get information about the elements displayed on screen in the form of an AccessibilityEvent.

Our implementation of the 1Password Automatic Filling service starts with this callback:

 @Override
 public void onAccessibilityEvent(AccessibilityEvent event) {
 // Insert magic here
 }

The onAccessibilityEvent callback is fired whenever a user interface event occurs for which we have registered. In our case, we are interested in events which indicate that the elements on the screen have changed. In particular, we register to receive typeViewFocused, typeWindowStateChanged, and typeWindowContentChanged events. By monitoring these events, we can keep an eye out for potential login screens or other opportunities for 1Password to fill.

When the callback is fired for one of these events, our next step is to see if we can identify login fields on the updated screen. We can determine which user interface elements are displayed on screen by invoking AccessibilityEvent.getRootInActiveWindow(). From the root AccessibilityNodeInfo object returned by this method, we can obtain information about all the user interface elements displayed in the active window. In particular, we look for arrangements of text fields matching the pattern for login entry. Once login fields have been identified, the 1Password Keyboard is notified that automatic filling is available. The keyboard is also passed the package name of the application or the URL of the website in which the login fields were detected.

Login selection

1Password keyboard Login sectionKeyboards on Android are built upon the InputMethodService APIs provided by the OS and, in this sense, the 1Password Keyboard is similar to other third-party keyboards. However, the benefit of creating a custom keyboard is that it can be tweaked to do a whole lot more than simple text entry. In the case of 1Password, our keyboard also allows you to view and select the Login items contained in your vault. When you tap the 1Password button on the keyboard, we expand the keyboard to full screen in order to display a list of relevant Logins.

If the 1Password Keyboard has been notified that automatic filling is available, it will look at the package name or URL provided by the 1Password Automatic Filling service and attempt to match it with the Logins contained in your vault. We display any matching Logins and offer the ability to browse for additional logins when appropriate. From here, you can tap on a Login to select it for filling.

Login filling

1Password keyboard filling completeOnce you have selected the appropriate Login for filling, the 1Password Keyboard exits fullscreen mode and once again shows the keyboard keys. You will now see two buttons displayed above the keyboard for filling the username and password corresponding to the selected Login. These buttons provide the ability to manually fill Login credentials in those instances when the 1Password Automatic Filling service isn’t enabled or when it doesn’t correctly identify the login fields in question.

However, when the 1Password Automatic Filling service is enabled and has detected the login fields, the 1Password Keyboard will do all of that work for you. The keyboard asks the 1Password Automatic Filling service to select the appropriate login fields by invoking:

 AccessibilityNodeInfo.performAction(AccessibilityNodeInfo.ACTION_FOCUS);

Once each login field has been focused by the 1Password Automatic Filling service, the 1Password Keyboard is notified. It then inputs the username or password text directly into that field. Once this is done, all that is required of you is to tap the “Sign In” button.

Security and convenience

By combining the 1Password Keyboard with the 1Password Automatic Filling service, we are able to provide a filling solution that avoids use of the clipboard entirely and doesn’t rely on passing your credentials through a third party. Whether you use the 1Password Keyboard as your main keyboard or in addition to your favorite keyboard, securely filling Logins into apps and browsers is only a couple of taps away.

If you would like to read more about enabling the 1Password Keyboard and Automatic Filling service on your Android device, please see our helpful documentation.

1Password tips

Quick Tip: Migrate your details between 1Password items

We all have our own ways of keeping things neat and tidy, and having something out of place can just throw your whole day out of whack. Luckily, 1Password mini can help you keep things organized just the way you like them.

Let’s say someone sends you the details for the Wi-Fi router at their house, but it’s in a Secure Note instead of the Wireless Router template for 1Password.

Wireless network data stored in a Secure Note

If you’re like me, this is the kind of thing that could make you a bit, well…

homer_go_crazy

So, let’s move the relevant data over to a new Wireless Router item and set things right with a few simple steps:

1. Create the new item

In 1Password, create a new item in the proper category. Launch 1Password, and choose File > New Item > Wireless Router. This is the new item where the previous Secure Note’s content will go. Leave this new item in edit mode.

Create a new Wireless Router item

2. Open the original item in 1Password mini and anchor it

Click the 1Password mini icon in the toolbar and search for or browse to the Secure Note containing the details you want to migrate to the new entry. Click the anchor button in the bottom left of the detail view to keep the item on screen.

Copy and paste the details

3. Copy and paste

At this point, you can copy and paste the relevant information from the original item. You can also create new sections and fields for any important information that doesn’t fit elsewhere. When you’re finished, save the new item.

4. Delete the original item

At this point, the original item is no longer needed and can be safely deleted.

5. Bonus points: share!

Share the new entry with the person who sent you the Secure Note version using the item’s Share button.

Share the item

This use case comes up for me more often than I would have thought in the past. The Wireless Router example is a real one from a recent trip to visit the team in our Toronto office. Beyond that, I have quite a few items I exported from Yojimbo long ago, and those only exported as plain text files. I imported those text files as Secure Notes in 1Password and I have been migrating them to proper 1Password entries here and there over time. Instead of switching back and forth between items in 1Password, using 1Password mini’s anchored windows helps to make the process of migrating data between categories a lot simpler.

1Password for Android header

Fingerprint unlock coming to 1Password for Android [Update: Sneak peek!]

A strong Master Password is critical to keeping your 1Password vault secure. It’s also not the easiest thing to type out on a mobile device. What if you had another way to unlock your vault, in addition to your master password? One that is both convenient and secure?

For some time now, we’ve been wanting to give you the ability to unlock 1Password for Android using your fingerprint. The challenge has been that there was no standard way for us to implement it that would work across a variety of devices made by different manufacturers. And so we waited, and you waited.

Now, our wait is over.

The Android M Developer Preview was just announced at Google I/O, Google’s annual developer conference going on right now in San Francisco. For us, one of the most exciting new features is the standardized fingerprint support that is coming to the Android platform. This means that we have some awesome news for you:

We will be adding support for fingerprint unlock to 1Password for Android when Android M launches later this year!

Fingerprint unlock (1Password for Android)

We don’t usually talk about upcoming features, but we were just too excited about this one to keep it a secret.

As we get closer to the launch of Android M, we will need your help to beta test fingerprint unlock. If you’d like to be among the first to try it out, we invite you to join our beta team. We will share more information in time; for now, we hope you are as excited about this new development as we are!

Update: We had the privilege of being demoed at Google I/O today! If you happened to be in the audience, we’d love to hear what you thought of the demo. And if you weren’t, we’re happy to be able to show you a very, very quick sneak peek. Here’s what it might be like to access your 1Password vault using fingerprint unlock.

because we love you sale, feature image

The Because We Love You Sale

UPDATE: The Because We Love You Sale will be ending the evening of May 27, 2015.

Everything we do here at AgileBits is with you in our hearts & minds: whether it’s sharing tips & tricks to enhance your security, squashing bugs & implementing exciting new features, or answering your questions in our Support Forums, our focus is always on you.  And every once in a while we like to go all out and show how much we appreciate you by having a good old-fashioned sale.

We usually like to focus a sale around a holiday or a release from a certain California-based fruit company, but today we were searching for another reason to celebrate. So we gathered our crack marketing team around the MacBook and started brainstorming ideas:

  • Dinosaurs are awesome! Okay, maybe we’re just really excited for that new prehistoric blockbuster that’s coming soon to a theater near you.
  • Someone on the team had a birthday! It’s true, there’ve been a number of May birthdays here at AgileBits, but we’ve already overdosed on sugary frosting.
  • Baseball’s back! But really, we just wanted to sing “Take me out to the ballgame.”
  • Spring is here?  It’s been done a billion times before.  Boring.
  • We love you! Oh, there it is. What better reason do we need than just to simply say…

we love you. And to show how much we care, we’re knocking 30% off 1Password across the board on Mac, Windows, iOS, and Android.

While our love for you will last forever, this sale won’t. So if you or someone you love has been holding off on buying 1Password, now is the time to say, “I love you, too.”

You can pick up a Mac/Windows bundle (or grab them separately) on our AgileBits Store. 1Password for Mac is also available on the Mac App Store. And 1Password for iOS is on the iOS App Store, and 1Password for Android on Google Play.

more than just passwords

Staying on top of deadlines and expiry dates

1Password is at its best when it’s helping us forget — not just our passwords and credit card numbers, but also where we put that thing. 1Password remembers, so we don’t have to. It’s easy to get hooked on this line of thinking. You start to ask yourself: what else can I afford to forget about?

How about deadlines? I’m not talking about calendar appointments. Think instead of the warranty on your laptop — the one that always runs out days before you need to use it. Think of the gift card you need to spend before Father’s Day. The domain name you keep forgetting to renew. The annual subscription you plan to cancel before you get charged again.

So much of our sensitive information comes with a best before date — and 1Password is great at keeping track of best before dates.

expires soon

You’re probably used to filling in the expiry date field for your credit card, but you might know that it’s also built into lots of other 1Password items — Passports, Memberships, Driver’s Licenses, etc. You can also add it to your own items using custom fields.

Once you assign expiry dates to all your time-sensitive items, you’re one smart folder away from seeing anything that needs your immediate attention.

expiry smart folder

The key to making this work is the second field (“Any Value” -> “contains”), which I’ve set to the current year. You could also fill in “2015-05″ to see only the items that expire in May, but tweaking this value every month might be too fiddly for your tastes. I find a year’s worth of expiry dates is manageable so long as I review the folder every once in a while.

1Password won’t ever replace my calendar, but there are some due dates it handles with style — especially when it comes to information I can’t risk keeping anywhere else.

How do you use 1Password to make your life a little more manageable? We’d love to find out. Share your creative ideas in the comments!

DevBits, featured image

On The Design And Building of 1Password for Apple Watch

When Tim Cook took the stage back in September to announce the next generation of Apple hardware, and that there was already an SDK for it, we were incredibly excited (and that’s putting it mildly!)

I believe our reaction was something akin to:

“We can make a 1Password app for Apple Watch!”

“That’s awesome!”

…brief silence…

“What would a 1Password app for Apple Watch do?” 

Day 0: the idea phase

We tossed a number of ideas around that first day, but the one we kept coming back to was our new (at the time) support for one-time passwords in 1Password for iOS.

One-time passwords seemed like a perfect fit for Apple Watch. They are a fixed length of 6 characters, so fitting them on the Apple Watch’s screen would be simple. They are refreshed every 30 seconds, so they could be stored and displayed without the need for authentication each time.

Also, they fit perfectly into the use case of logging into a site on your computer, and then looking to your wrist for the second factor verification.

So, we were decided, one-time passwords it was!

Day 23: build/design phase, part 1

1Password for Apple Watch was a simple three screen app in its infancy. There was one screen for the scenario of “no data”, one screen to list the items that included one-time passwords, and one screen to show the selected item’s one-time password.

A crucial part of the design was that we didn’t want you to have to enter your Master Password anywhere to access the information on Apple Watch. The usefulness of having your 1Password data on your wrist went way down if you needed to pull your phone out of your pocket to access it.

 

Interlude

Apple Watch apps are an interesting animal in that very little code actually runs on Apple Watch itself. Instead, each Apple Watch app is comprised of two parts: the visual “shell” that runs on Apple Watch, and an app extension that runs on the phone. The app on Apple Watch talks to the app extension over Bluetooth to get its data and respond to user interactions.

Apple Watch App Architecture

1password-for-apple-watch-03A good example to illustrate this idea is the PIN code screen in 1Password for Apple Watch. Each time you tap a digit on Apple Watch’s screen the following actions take place:

  1. Information about the tap is sent via Bluetooth to the 1Password Watch Extension (running silently in the background on your iPhone).
  2. The 1Password Watch Extension determines which digit was tapped and adds it to any digits tapped before.
  3. The extension then tells the Apple Watch app to update the PIN length indicator at the bottom of the screen, which requires another transfer of information over Bluetooth.
  4. If the tapped digit is the fourth in a series the 1Password Watch Extension checks to see if it is the correct PIN code, and if so tells the watch app to display the list of items, which requires yet another trip over Bluetooth.

As you can see, even a simple interaction with an app on Apple Watch can create a lot of Bluetooth traffic back and forth between Apple Watch and iPhone.

Day 45: fine-tuning

Once we had a baseline set of requirements and user interface designs we started to work out how to get the one-time password data to 1Password for Apple Watch.

Because we weren’t going to require your Master Password to access your data we precluded ourselves from being able to decrypt your 1Password vault, meaning we needed a place to store the one-time password secrets for use by 1Password for Apple Watch. We decided to utilize the iOS keychain as a secure storage location that wouldn’t require decryption each time we wanted to use it.

Of course this decision came with its own set of challenges, namely that we were going outside of the 1Password ecosystem to store secure data. Because of this fact we knew we had to ramp up our customer education efforts about this new feature and make sure that it was opt-in only.

We added what we called a “keychain maintainer” to the main 1Password app that would listen for changes in the 1Password database, determine if those changes were one-time password-related, and update the iOS keychain accordingly. The keychain maintainer worked out really well as it handled changes that were made by our sync system as well as any changes made to an item by a person manually.

With the keychain successfully populated with data all we needed to do was load this data in the 1Password Watch Extension and use it to populate the list of items. We finished up the implementation of the three screens and 1Password for Apple Watch was done…or so we thought.

Day 97: 1Password for Apple Watch v1 debut …

At this point we were quite happy with ourselves. 1Password for Apple Watch was complete months before Apple’s launch date of late April. We began to show it off to friends and industry acquaintances to get their reactions. Some of them thought it was very cool that they’d have access to their one-time passwords on their wrist, but many more of them weren’t exactly over the moon about it, and some had to be educated about one-time passwords before they understood exactly what it was we were offering.

It all came to a head when we were on a business trip and in a meeting with a handful of individuals whose opinions we really respect. With our usual gusto we showed off 1Password for Apple Watch and…it fell flat. Out of the five people in the room with us, only one person was genuinely excited about. They say two outta three ain’t bad. No one ever says anything about one outta five.

We knew we needed to do more.

So we went back to the drawing board: beyond one-time passwords, what kind of information would be useful to have on your wrist? We started to brainstorm ideas and realized there was a whole class of secure information that could be stored in 1Password that we weren’t leveraging: all kinds of small pieces of secure information that you need throughout the day.

Store your locker combination on your Apple Watch.

Store your locker combination on your Apple Watch.

1Password for Apple Watch can ensure that your door's unlock code is always handy.

1Password for Apple Watch can ensure that your door’s unlock code is always handy.

 

We started to work up some use cases. Gym locker combination? Check. Garage door code? Check. Would it be useful to see your credit card info while placing an order over the phone? Yep. We discovered all sorts of situations where it might not be convenient to pull your phone out of your pocket, unlock it, open 1Password, unlock 1Password, and search your vault for the data you needed. Apple Watch, however, was the perfect place for this kind of information. App interactions are incredibly short and perfect for the things you need on the go: you get in, get your data, and get out.

Day 98: the re-build phase

With this new vision for 1Password for Apple Watch we began to rework both the user interface and the code.

Because we were expanding beyond one-time passwords we no longer wanted 1Password for Apple Watch populated with a whole set of information automatically. Everything that appeared on your wrist needed to be there because you put it there. A button was added to the bottom of the item detail screen that allows you to add/remove an item to/from your Apple Watch. This button ended up being a shortcut for adding a new “Apple Watch” tag to the current item. The cool thing about this approach is that you can manage your Apple Watch items not only on your phone, but also on any of your other devices or computers simply by adding the “Apple Watch” tag and syncing the changes over.

Our keychain maintainer evolved beyond looking for one-time passwords to looking for items tagged with “Apple Watch” instead. We added an extra set of attributes (encrypted with the 1Password Apple Watch PIN code) to our keychain entries to handle the extra data for logins, passwords, secure notes, and credit cards. 

In 1Password for Apple Watch itself we ended up adding four new screens to support the new item types in addition to the original one-time password screen. When Apple Watch shipped at the end of April our app’s design looked like so:

Apple Watch App Storyboard

Today

1Password for Apple Watch 01I hope you’ve enjoyed this little glimpse into the process behind 1Password for Apple Watch. If you have any questions please leave them in the comments below, I’d love to talk some more about our process here. For some further reading I’d recommend our excellent Apple Watch User Guide and our Apple Watch Security Guide.

Windows v4 blog

Turbo boost 1Password for Windows with new 4.5 version

Ctrl+\ has become muscle memory for millions of 1Password users all around the world. It’s hard to beat the speed of a customizable keyboard shortcut. Unless, of course, we focus on what happens after you invoke the 1Password extension in your web browser.

The technology behind the extension is what fills your 1Password information in web forms. It’s an incredibly complex system that we lovingly call The Brain, and it has received a serious upgrade in 1Password 4.5 for Windows. What this means for you is that filling web forms is now faster and more accurate than ever before.

An upgraded Brain is only one of the time-saving, experience-enhancing improvements in 1Password 4.5, which is a free update and available to download right now from our website.

Time-based, One-Time Passwords (TOTPs)

These single-use passwords are becoming more commonplace as a supplementary security measure to protect online accounts. If you’re not familiar with them, our blog post will help you learn how to use them in 1Password. Not only is it possible to add a time-based, one-time password to your Login items in 1Password 4.5, but it’s a cinch to do it.

Personalize Secure Notes with custom fields

Custom fields are great. They let you modify an item’s details view to hold exactly the information you want, formatted in a way that makes sense to you. In version 4.5, we’ve introduced custom fields to the Secure Notes item type.

Adding custom fields to your secure notes

1Password speaks your language

We have begun localizing 1Password for Windows and are kicking things off with nine languages. Thanks to our wonderful translators, they are:

  • Czech
  • Dutch
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Polish
  • Spanish
  • Swedish

If you’d like to help translate 1Password into your language, you can create a free Crowdin account and join us at https://crowdin.com/project/1password-for-windows-desktop.

Report website issues with Synapse

The 1Password extension is pretty much continuously being improved. It has to be, because there are umpteen billion websites out there, many with their own quirks and many others constantly changing. Now, you can help us ensure maximum compatibility by reporting any website issues you encounter.

In the extension menu, select the option to report an issue with the current website.

In the old days, you’d report a website and we’d ask you all sorts of questions, trying to learn any detail that might help us reproduce and diagnose the problem. No more! There are no lengthy questions to answer and you don’t have to know every minute detail about your web browser or the website. Our new website reporter makes it super easy: simply select the option in the extension menu and all the relevant information is already filled out for you.

Accessibility, Wi-Fi Sync, and more

If you use the NVDA screen reader, you should notice a marked improvement in this release. We are committed to making 1Password fully accessible to you, and there’s always room for improvement. We’d love your help in determining what most needs our attention. Please let us know how we’re doing!

Last on the list of highlights, but certainly not least, is Wi-Fi Sync. This is a wonderful way for you to sync 1Password for Windows with 1Password for iOS when you’re on the same wireless network, if you prefer not to use cloud-based services. We are constantly working to improve performance and reliability, and Wi-Fi Sync has received a nice coat of polish in this update.

1Password 4.5 for Windows is available now as a free update for existing owners (Help > Check for New Version), or you can grab a new copy from our downloads page. Thank you for choosing 1Password!

1Passwords new brain

Synapse and 1Password’s new brain

Filling is clearly one of the most important features in 1Password.  I know, I know, security is super important too … it protects our data from prying eyes and provides some very valuable peace of mind. But day to day, it is the convenience of being able to fill those long, randomly generated strings of gibberish into various sign-in pages that makes 1Password truly awesome. I’d love to say 1Password’s encryption is my favourite feature, but I’d be lying. When it comes down to it, I just don’t want to have to type my passwords. Ever.

So we rely on the 1Password extension to put those complex passwords where they belong to log us in to websites, pop our credit card details into online shopping forms, and provide our identity details for all those fun new services we can’t wait to try out.

Unfortunately, every now and then we run into a website that just doesn’t seem to want to play nice with 1Password’s current filling algorithms for one reason or another. Believe me, our intrepid filling gurus have performed some complicated code gymnastics to convince the existing extensions to fill forms on these less-than-standard websites. As 1Password sought to tackle more complex login screens, it became more and more challenging to write new solutions in and around the existing codebase.

So, in the 5.3 update for 1Password for Mac, our developers decided the best solution was a complete brain transplant for the extension.

1Password’s new brain

Version 5.3 of 1Password for iOS and version 5.3 of 1Password for Mac have now been released with this brand new brain, and Windows and Android users will see updates soon that take advantage of 1Password’s new smarts as well.  This new brain will provide filling that is more consistent across all of the platforms that we offer 1Password on, with more flexible algorithms that can be used on multiple websites, and easier-to-code solutions for those ‘unique’ sign in pages.

What’s improved here?

The browser extension is now a lot smarter at capturing user information on non-standard websites when a new Login is saved. And you may not notice this on your end, but many sites that previously required some of those complicated code gymnastics filling workarounds now fill smoothly – which makes the codebase a much nicer place for our team to play. Starting in version 5.3, you will see an improvement in Credit Card and Identity filling, particularly with respect to the filling of expiry dates. In addition, our gallant gurus have finally managed to slay a particularly troublesome dragon of a website: Citibank saving and filling will now work seamlessly across all login pages! Go on, re-save your Citibank Login to test … I know you want to.  :)

Even more awesome than the changes that are already introduced is the framework that our developers have built here. We’ve got a great foundation for future improvements … and our team is already working on slaying more dragons.

Synapse

Not only is 1Password’s new brain better, stronger, faster, AND more fill-ier than ever, but it ALSO comes with an awesome new reporting feature that will allow users to let us know when 1Password isn’t filling properly – from right within the app! Not only does this feature save you the effort of having to post in the forums or email in to tell us when filling isn’t working, but it quickly gets developers the information that they need, and provides a way for us to communicate fixes and workarounds to you. It’s all-around awesome.

So, what is Synapse?

Synapse is a brand new tool that lets customers report broken filling on websites directly through 1Password. Synapse will automatically gather the information about the site that developers need to quickly diagnose (and fix) the problem.  Now, that’s a great improvement for our team, but Synapse is also something for you to get excited about, because beyond making it easy to let us know when something’s not right, this tool will also advise you of any known workarounds (or the fix version) when you report a site that we’re already working on.

How can users report?

report_website_issueOur Knowledgebase has an article that can tell you all about this awesome new feature. But it’s easy to find, right in the extension’s menu!

What information does Synapse gather?

First and foremost: Synapse does nothing without your explicit consent. No information is gathered until you click the ‘submit’ button when reporting a website.

Because Synapse is an information-gathering tool, we want to be very clear about what information we are receiving when you report a website. As always, we take your privacy very seriously. And with Synapse, we take every effort to prevent sensitive information from being collected. Usernames, passwords, and other secure details are not included in the report which is sent to us. We’re also careful to mask any kind of information that could possibly identify you.

screen_shot_2015-04-09_at_11.08.59_am

Here’s what Synapse does collect:

  • The platform you are using. Currently this feature is implemented in 1Password for Mac (introduced in version 5.3), and the beta version of 1Password for Windows. We’d love to expand this feature to our mobile platforms in the future, if possible.
  • 1Password’s version number.
  • The version number of the browser extension.
  • Which browser is being used (Safari, Chrome, Firefox, or Opera).
  • The browser’s user agent.
  • The browser’s bundle identifier.
  • The URL of the site that is misbehaving.
  • The item’s Category type: whether you are attempting to fill a Login, Identity, Credit Card, or Password item.
  • Where the item was created: sometimes a Login created in the main app can behave differently than an item that was saved directly from the extension.
  • The date the item was created.
  • The date the item was last updated.
  • Any additional comments you might choose to share.

How does this make life easier for us all?

On the development end of things, Synapse gives developers a lovely aggregated list of the reported sites, which easily identifies the top issues and lets the team focus on fixing the issues that are most important to you. In addition to easy prioritization, developers have a ton of useful information to help track down the issue … without even needing to request it. Not only does this save time for our developers, but it also saves you from having to hunt down these details, which are not always easy to find! We think it’s a win-win situation.

Synapse also provides us a way to easily notify you when progress has been made on the issues you report. When you report an issue in Synapse, you’ll see an option to provide us with your email address. Sharing your email address means that our team can contact you if they need any more information about the issue that you reported. But, more importantly, it also means that we have a way to let you know when we have a workaround, or, even better, a proper resolution to the issue.

What else will you see when you report an issue with Synapse?

When you report an issue with Synapse, you’ll also be advised of any existing workarounds for the issue and be able to vote on if the workaround was successful for you, which provides us with some valuable feedback.  If our developers have already fixed the issue for a future update, you’ll see that notice as well.

Basically, what it comes down to is a pretty awesome update for those of us who rely on 1Password’s filling magic. 1Password’s filling is stronger and more ready to take on those uniquely designed websites, and with Synapse you can easily tell us when something’s not working and give the developers the details they need to fix it quickly.

Let us know what you think about Synapse and 1Password’s new brain in the comments, or in our forums.

Watch-on-wrist

1Password for Apple Watch: Putting Security Within Arm’s Reach

1Password for Apple Watch 01Today’s the day! A number of you (and a number of us) are finally going to be able to play with the latest and greatest addition to our gadget family: Apple Watch. No doubt, once you have sent your heartbeat to someone, put in your height and weight measurements for fitness tracking, and marveled at just how cool the haptic feedback is, you’re going to start playing with all the apps that have added support for Apple Watch. As you may have noticed from our latest iOS update, 1Password is one of those apps. We’re thrilled to introduce 1Password for Apple Watch and answer all of your burning questions about this handy little companion app to 1Password for iOS.

Is all of my 1Password data on my watch?

Add to Apple WatchNope! Much like Apple Watch is a companion device to your iPhone, 1Password for Apple Watch is a companion app to 1Password for iOS. After you enable Apple Watch functionality in 1Password’s settings, a new option will appear on the item detail screen which will allow you to “Add to Apple Watch”. You choose which pieces of information you want to make available on your Apple Watch. Logins, Passwords, Credit Cards, and Secure Notes are all fair game to add to Apple Watch.

What am I going to use this for?

When Apple Watch was announced, we immediately began brainstorming ways to bring 1Password to this incredibly personal device. Our first idea was a bit of a no-brainer: the small screen of Apple Watch, coupled with being able to access it quickly, made it the ideal place for one time passwords (TOTP). For a long time that was all our Apple Watch app did; however, after some more thought we realized it could be used for so much more.

As a recent blog post explains, 1Password can be used to store all kinds of information beyond website logins. Locker combinations, bike lock combinations, garage door codes, office keyless entry codes, banking PINs…. All of these pieces of information can be stored in 1Password, and with the introduction of Apple Watch they can now be stored on your wrist.

This is where 1Password for Apple Watch shines: Small pieces of secure data that you need throughout your day can literally be kept within arm’s reach at all times.

Store your locker combination on your Apple Watch.

Store your locker combination on your Apple Watch.

1Password for Apple Watch can ensure that your door's unlock code is always handy.

1Password for Apple Watch can ensure that your door’s unlock code is always handy.

Ok, I’m in! How do I get started?

We have a much more detailed User Guide that goes in-depth on how to set up 1Password for Apple Watch, but we’ll give you the 30,000 foot view of it here.

Step 0: Ensure you have set a device PIN code (or, preferably, a longer, more secure passphrase) and that you have purchased our Pro Features.

Step 1: Open 1Password for iOS and tap on Settings > Apple Watch > Enable Apple Watch. Set a PIN code for use on Apple Watch, and you’re good to go.

Step 2: Add an item to your Apple Watch by tapping on “Add to Apple Watch” in the item details screen.

There is no step three! (And no, we didn’t cheat by starting at zero).

Well this sounds lovely

We hope you love using 1Password on your Apple Watch as much as on all of your other devices! How will you use it to help keep all of your bits of information easily accessible? Leave a note in the comments and let us know.

1Clock

1Password, time zones, and you

When is yesterday really today

Over the last few weeks we’ve released huge updates to 1Password across all of our platforms. Along with some awesome new features and improvements, these updates contained a fix to a pretty important, and to be honest, rather embarrassing date problem. You see, there were some cases where you would find dates in 1Password shifting by a day if you travelled to a different time zone.

Wendy's birthday is January 24, 1984

For example: Wendy enters her birthday (January 24, 1984) into her Passport item in 1Password. When she travels West to visit her brother, she notices that the birthdate listed in her Passport item is now January 23, 1984.

To understand why this is happening, we have to take a look at how 1Password stores dates.

Dates as timestamps

1Password uses date fields in a number of items. These date fields fall into one of two different formats; Month/Year fields like a Credit Card expiry, or full date fields (Day/Month/Year) like a birthday in a Passport. Month/Year fields are stored as just that, a month and a year, and as a result weren’t a problem. Date fields however were stored as seconds since midnight 1970 UTC.

For example: Wendy’s birthdate (Jan 24, 1984) is stored in her 1Password database as 443750400 seconds since midnight 1970 UTC.

screen_shot_2015-04-20_at_10.18.49_am

This in itself is not a problem, however we chose to use the native date picker in Mac and iOS to help users when entering dates, but had not set the time zone for these dates to UTC. This meant that dates were saved using the local time zone. When displaying the date we would adjust for the time zone and all would appear to be fine… as long as you stayed in the same time zone. Unfortunately few of us stay in one place in this day and age. When travelling into a different time zone it was quite possible that you would find your date fields shifted one day earlier.

UTC moving forward

To ensure that this doesn’t happen for newly created dates we have set the time zone to UTC when both setting and showing dates. This way we never need to adjust to the local time zone and the date will always show up properly.

What about old dates?

Any dates that have been entered into 1Password on Mac or iOS prior to version 5.3 have been created with the local time zone setting. When we made the change to the UTC time zone, we made the decision not to make any changes to existing dates. Displaying or converting them to UTC would be incorrect in most cases and could cause further confusion, so your existing dates will continue to be displayed using the local time zone setting. For most people, most of the time, this will display correctly. However it is possible that by moving time zones you might see these older dates appear off by one day. If you wish to correct these dates to the new UTC time zone setting, simply edit the date field and save the changes. This will force a change to UTC and ensure that your dates display correctly, whatever globetrotting you do.

Travel with confidence

While most of you have never encountered this issue, I would like to take this opportunity to apologize to those who did. We appreciate your assistance in reporting and helping us track this bug. Rest assured that our fix will keep any new dates rock solid from now on regardless of where your travels take you.

If you have any questions about this fix, please let us know in the comments or in our forums.