1Password 7 for iOS: Efficiency Abounds

Hello and happy November, everyone! We’ve long anticipated this day here at AgileBits. After months of hard work, 1Password 7 for iOS is now available on iOS 11.

The very first step in the journey that brought us to this point was taken back in June, shortly after the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference. Before a single line of code was written, before a single new screen was designed, we set a single goal for this update: efficiency. Along the way, we also added a few more features, like support for iPhone X and Face ID, and we’re excited to finally share it all with you.

As our release notes say, this is the greatest version of 1Password for iOS we have ever shipped, so let’s dive in, shall we?

iPhone X and Face ID

On September 12th, like many of you, everyone here at AgileBits was glued to their screens watching Apple’s keynote from the beautiful Steve Jobs Theater at the new Apple Park campus. The announcement of iPhone X was already exciting, but the introduction of Face ID was like Christmas for us. We knew right away that we’d move heaven and earth to be there on launch day with Face ID support.

We began working immediately to make sure that 1Password worked perfectly on iPhone X. Apple was smart and made Face ID work wherever Touch ID already does, so technically we didn’t need to do anything. But that’s not the way we roll.

We completely optimized the lock screen for Face ID. Matt Davey, who led the design effort, blew the doors off with this one. 🙂

My iPhone X is set to arrive tomorrow, and I can’t wait to install 1Password and step into the future.

Quick Copy

In a perfect world, every developer would be as awesome as these folks and take five minutes to add support for 1Password to their app. But because we don’t live in a perfect world, signing in to another app sometimes used to mean you needed to:

  1. Open 1Password.
  2. Find the Login you need.
  3. Copy your username.
  4. Switch back to the app where you need it.
  5. Paste your username.
  6. Switch back to 1Password.
  7. Copy your password.
  8. Switch back to the app where you need it.
  9. Paste the password.

And if you needed the one-time password for that app, there were four more steps after that. Yeesh!

In 1Password 7, copying is now done automatically. After you copy your username and paste it in another app, switching back to 1Password will automatically copy your password. And it’s the same with one-time passwords. Switch back one more time, and they’re copied automatically, too.

You can learn more about Quick Copy on our lovely support site.

Favorites

There’s no faster way to access an item than by adding it as a favorite. At least, that’s what we used to think. In 1Password 7, I’m happy to say that we’ve done better. Way better.

Now, when you tap an item in Favorites, you’ll see all the details you want to copy in a beautiful array of bubbles. Simply tap on any one of the bubbles to copy its value to the clipboard. Not only that, but items on the Favorites list participate in Quick Copy as well!

The Key to a Great App

iOS has wonderful support for external keyboards, and I’m happy to report that now 1Password does, too. If you’re one of our keyboard warriors, make sure you give it a try. 1Password 7 includes keyboard shortcuts for searching, switching tabs, opening and filling items, and more.

Go Speed Racer

Big, new features are awesome, but we didn’t stop there. We dug deep to unearth some truly fantastic perfomance increases for this update as well. 1Password now unlocks 33% faster and has seen a 400% increase in stability throughout. We also made some improvements to our password generator to make it much more responsive and easier to use.

Wrapping It Up In a Pretty Package

No major update would be complete without a fresh coat of paint on the user interface. 1Password 7 sports a beautiful new icon with a gorgeous gradient on the lock ring. That color scheme carries through to the lock screen where, if you let it sit for a few seconds, you’ll notice a gentle “happiness vortex” animation take place as the colors go for a spin.

Many of you use the 1Password extension to sign in to websites directly in Safari or other third-party apps. The next time you do, you’ll see the extension received a fantastic visual update as well!

We’ve also overhauled the navigation bar at the bottom of the screen with some new iconography and a better layout. Coupled with the aforementioned new look for Favorites, our beloved iOS app has never looked better.

And the Hits Keep Coming

Check out the 1Password for iOS release notes for a full account of everything we’ve crammed into 1Password 7, but I wanted to close out with a few more of my top picks:

  • If you register a new fingerprint with Touch ID, 1Password will require your Master Password the next time you open it.
  • You can now delete multiple items at once. Swipe down from the top of an item list, select the items you want to remove, then tap Delete.
  • Recently used items appear in Favorites for easy access.
  • Saving a new Login now informs you that the password for that Login has been copied to the clipboard.
  • An advanced security setting allows you to use a PIN code to unlock 1Password, even on devices that support Touch ID or Face ID.

Whew! Are you still with me? If so, well done! If you haven’t already done so, go download 1Password 7 now and tell us what your favorite new feature is.

Until next time!

Integrate 1Password into your Android apps

Account sign-up and sign-in is a critical piece of your app, but it’s also the part that is most likely to create friction for new users. It might be necessary for your app to collect information such as an email address and password, but let’s face it, those details are rather tedious to type out.

Here’s something that happens far more often than it should. I’m out with a friend and they’ve just told me about this fantastic new app. I get fired up and download it to my phone, only to be confronted with a wall of text fields. I need to register for a new account before I can continue, and that seems like a lot of work. So I tell myself that I’ll do it when I get home and of course, I forget all about it. By the time I look at the app again, I’ve lost that initial excitement and more often than not, I just delete the app.

If I do give the app another chance, I still need to go through the hassle of creating a new account. Of course, I have 1Password to help me here, but I still need to switch between apps, copying and pasting the values as I go. Wouldn’t it be so much better if the app could just ask 1Password to create my credentials and then sign me in?

I’m very happy to say that this is no longer just wishful thinking! We’ve been working closely with Google and other leading password managers on a protocol for Android called OpenYOLO. This new protocol provides the kind of seamless integration that would have saved me so much of the frustration above. The best part is that implementing the protocol is simple, and you can get started on integrating it into your Android app today!

Getting started with OpenYOLO


You Only Login Once (YOLO) is Google’s internal code name for their Smart Lock for Passwords API on Android. OpenYOLO is its open-source successor that enables client apps to communicate directly with supported providers like 1Password. Using OpenYOLO, your app can ask 1Password to create, save, retrieve, or delete its user credentials.

It’s almost effortless to integrate 1Password with your app using OpenYOLO! Let me show you just how easy it is to get started…

Import the library

Add this line to your app’s build.gradle file to import the OpenYOLO API:

dependencies {
    compile 'org.openyolo:openyolo-api:0.3.1'
}

Get the client

You’ll need an instance of CredentialClient in order to interact with OpenYOLO. It provides convenience methods for sending requests and retrieving responses.

mCredentialClient = CredentialClient.getInstance(this);

Prepare the request

For each operation, your app needs to prepare a request and retrieve an Intent for handling it. You can then hand off the request to OpenYOLO with startActivityForResult(). OpenYOLO will take the request and determine if there are any credential providers like 1Password available to handle it. If multiple providers are available, the user will be prompted to select which one to use to complete the request.

Handle the response

Once the chosen provider has completed the request, a response will be returned to your app in onActivityResult(). You can use CredentialClient to pull the relevant information from the response.

Working with 1Password to simplify users’ experiences

Signing up new users

To avoid another story like mine above, you can assist users with new account registration in your app. Before prompting me to manually enter my email address and choose a unique password, your app can make a request to have those credentials generated.

HintRetrieveRequest request = HintRetrieveRequest.fromAuthMethods(AuthenticationMethods.EMAIL);

Intent hintIntent = mCredentialClient.getHintRetrieveIntent(request);

startActivityForResult(hintIntent, HINT_REQUEST_CODE);

In my case, 1Password will prompt me to confirm that I want to create new credentials and OpenYOLO will return details to your app’s onActivityResult().

if (requestCode == HINT_REQUEST_CODE) {
    HintRetrieveResult result = mCredentialClient.getHintRetrieveResult(data);

    if (result.isSuccessful()) {
        Hint hint = mCredentialClient.getHintRetrieveResult(data).getHint();

        signUpUser(hint.getIdentifier(), hint.getGeneratedPassword());
    }
}

Saving user credentials

My account details are all filled in, and I’m ready to start exploring the app, but of course I want to make sure those new account details are stored in 1Password. This will come in handy the next time I need to sign in to your app. You can help here too with a simple save request to OpenYOLO.

Credential credential = new Credential.Builder(mEmail, AuthenticationMethods.EMAIL,
AuthenticationDomain.getSelfAuthDomain(this))
.setPassword(mPassword)
.build();

Intent saveIntent = mCredentialClient.getSaveIntent(CredentialSaveRequest.fromCredential(credential));

startActivityForResult(saveIntent, SAVE_REQUEST_CODE);

Now I am ready to go! Only a couple of seconds after downloading your app, I am all signed up for an account and more importantly, I can begin using it!

Signing in with existing credentials

Okay, now the fun part! My brand new and shiny Pixel 2 XL arrives and I download all of my favourite apps to it. I still need to sign in to my apps, but you’ve gone and saved me all the hassle by once again using OpenYOLO.

CredentialRetrieveRequest request = CredentialRetrieveRequest.fromAuthMethods(AuthenticationMethods.EMAIL);

Intent retrieveIntent = mCredentialClient.getCredentialRetrieveIntent(request);

startActivityForResult(retrieveIntent, RETRIEVE_REQUEST_CODE);

In response to this request, 1Password will prompt me to select my sign-in credentials and OpenYOLO will return them to your app in onActivityResult():

if (requestCode == RETRIEVE_REQUEST_CODE) {
    CredentialRetrieveResult result = mCredentialClient.getCredentialRetrieveResult(data);

    if (result.isSuccessful()) {
        Credential credential = mCredentialClient.getCredentialRetrieveResult(data).getCredential();

        signInUser(credential.getIdentifier(), credential.getPassword());
    }
}

Less noise, more fun!

That’s it! With a few changes to your code, your app now integrates with 1Password using OpenYOLO. This decreases noise from your app and more importantly saves your users time and effort so that they can get to the really important part – using your app.

If a solution like this is in place the next time my buddy gets me to try out your app, I would be able to create an account with a few taps, and they would have the opportunity to show me why they love the app!

DroidCon London 2017

At DroidCon London today, Google announced that OpenYOLO is now ready for developers like yourself to leverage its powers and bring it into the hands of users. If you are also attending the conference, send a wave at my colleague, Michael Verde! He will be available for a hands-on session to help integrate OpenYOLO into your apps.

Reach out to us

For further details on integrating OpenYOLO into your Android app, take a look through the open-source project available on Github. The repository also includes a handful of sample apps to help with development. If you’re curious about the protocol itself, you can read all about it in the OpenYOLO for Android specification.

If you have any questions, feedback or want to let us know that your Android app supports integration with 1Password through OpenYOLO, please reach out to us at support+android@agilebits.com. We look forward to hearing from you!

1Password living on the [Microsoft] Edge

I’ve long been curious about Microsoft Edge. It’s fast, light-weight, and much more secure than the Internet Explorer of my childhood. It had everything you look for in a browser … except 1Password support. Today that changes!

Thanks to the hard work of the Microsoft Edge and Windows Store teams, along with our own Windows team, I’m excited to announce that 1Password now has a lovely new home right on your Microsoft Edge toolbar. 🎉

Boldly go where no Login item has gone before

To bring your items with you to explore Microsoft Edge, first make sure you have 1Password 6.7 or later installed and set up. Then, head to the Windows Store and grab the 1Password extension. Open Microsoft Edge, enable the 1Password extension, and enjoy saving new Login items, opening and filling in Microsoft Edge from 1Password mini, filling addresses and credit card details, and easy access to the Strong Password Generator, just like you’ve come to know and love. If you’re still using an older version of 1Password, you can follow this handy guide to migrate your existing data to the latest version of 1Password to get ready to seek out new frontiers in Microsoft’s latest browser.

Hello dark mode, my old friend

As you’re working your own 1Password magic in Microsoft Edge, don’t forget to check out my favorite feature: its super-sleek dark mode. I love how it turns your 1Password extension icon into a lovely point of light on your toolbar and it’s perfect for late-night browsing.  Let the stars next to your favorites light up Microsoft Edge and help guide you to your most loved websites at the click of a Login item. Of course, if a different vision has been planted in your brain, the extension icon looks right at home in light mode too. 😉

To the Edge and beyond!

As stoked as we are about 1Password coming to Microsoft Edge, this is only the beginning and some finishing touches are coming in future releases. Support for keyboard shortcuts to fill logins and some tweaks to how mini lets you know you’re filling in Edge are included with the latest 1Password 6 for Windows beta. Additional improvements for filling on certain sites will also be addressed down the road.

Currently, the 1Password extension in Microsoft Edge requires 1Password 6.7 for Windows or later and a 1Password membership. We will be expanding Edge availability in future releases but if you’d like to enjoy using Edge sooner than later, now is a great time to give a 1Password membership a try. In addition to early access, there are many other benefits and it’s free for 30 days!

I hope you enjoy saving and filling in Microsoft Edge and, as always, we love seeing your feedback in our support forum. 😊

Face it, The iPhone X Looks Amazing

Wow, what an incredible Apple event today! As you may have guessed the entire team here at AgileBits cozied up to their computers, iPads, Apple TVs, and iPhones to watch as the good folks at Apple took to the stage in the newly minted Steve Jobs Theater and proceeded to bring the house down. A new Apple Watch, a brand new 4K Apple TV, a new iPhone 8, the iPhone X! The hits just kept coming.

As blown away as we were by today’s product announcements we were even more blown away by our inclusion in the festivities. To see Phil Schiller on stage showing 1Password on the new iPhone X was magical. In case you missed it, here’s a screen grab we captured for posterity:

We truly can’t wait to get these new phones in our hands and into the hands of our customers. 1Password will be there on November 3rd with the new iPhone X and full support for Face ID.

It’s obvious what our favorite part of today’s announcements was, how about you? Sound off in the comments below and let’s nerd out together about this super cool new future.

Announcing the 1Password command-line tool public beta

Here at AgileBits, we’ve been working hard over the last few months to bring power users, developers, and administrators more powerful ways to interact with 1Password. We’re proud to announce that we have something that fits the bill. It’s called the 1Password command-line tool, and we can’t wait to see what you build with it. Let me take this opportunity to walk you through the exciting potential.

Introducing op

1Password apps are available on just about every platform, but they’ve always had the same dependency: a graphical interface. Now all of 1Password is available with just two characters: op.

The 1Password command-line tool makes your 1Password account accessible entirely from the command line. A simple op signin will securely authenticate you with the 1Password service and give you access to a wide range of capabilities:

Getting usernames and passwords from items:

$ op get item OpenProxy | jq '.details.fields[] | select(.designation=="password").value'

"genuine-adopt-pencil-coaster"

Creating new items and vaults:

$ op create item login $(cat aws.json | op encode) --title="AWS"

{"uuid":"5hinhvejl7wtmbeorfts7ho3di","vaultUuid":"i5imjpvdivbsxo56m2ap2n66gy"}
$ op create vault devops

{"uuid":"ny5khay7t3lmhrp4pjsxl4w34q"}

Working with documents:

$ op create document ./devops.pdf --vault=devops --tags=architecture

{"uuid":"i3rsiwjfh7aryvbu5odr4uleki","vaultUuid":"ny5khay7t3lmhrp4pjsxl4w34q"}

If you’re a team administrator, you can also manage other users and shared vaults — all without leaving your terminal:

op suspend john@acmecorp.com

One of the most frequent requests we receive from 1Password Teams customers is the ability to export the Activity Log. With the Pro plan, op list events makes it easy to ingest activity data into the application of your choosing. Be it Splunk, Kibana, Papertrail, or your own tool, op outputs JSON, so it’s simple to work with.

But we didn’t just build the tool to solve specific requests. It’s flexible enough to handle use cases we haven’t even thought of. The possibilities are endless, and we know you’ll come up with something amazing.

🎶 Rock, robot rock (solid) 🎶

The command structure is similar to tools you already use, providing easy integration with your workflow. Now automated systems can have access to secure credentials without ever storing them in plaintext. Here at AgileBits, for example, we’ve been using op for the last few months as part of our automated build systems. It’s been super useful for fetching secure keys and tokens required for building and deploying 1Password. After a secure op signin, we have a script that fetches the appropriate signing key from a shared vault and automatically signs new builds.

The tool was written from the ground up with the battle-tested Go programming language, the very same we used to build the 1Password service itself. As with every 1Password client, all encryption and decryption is done on your machine locally, ensuring the highest level of security best practices you’ve come to expect from the entire family of 1Password apps.

Get yo’ *NIX on

Our dreams of late have been filled with penguins. Two weeks ago we shared a treat with Linux users, and this week it becomes a feast. You might have already tried 1Password for Linux and Chrome OS, but we know what really makes developers salivate: a CLI. You can download op for macOS, Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and NetBSD on i386, ARM, and AMD64 architectures. Oh, and our Windows friends can play too!

What’s next?

If you’re as excited as we are about this, here’s everything you need to get started:

We highly value the thoughts of people using the beta in the real world, so we can continue improving the tool for you. As we work toward a stable release and eventually open source, please bear in mind that there may be breaking changes down the line, but we’re more than happy to work with you to resolve any issues. We look forward to working together to create some truly useful and powerful tools, and we can’t do it without you.

Now let’s get ready to 🎶 pipe it, grep it, cat it, sed it 🎶

1Password 6.6 for Android: Crunchy outer cookie, velvety smooth filling

While the solar eclipse was happening last Monday, another dramatic event involving a dark, disc-shaped object was also taking place in New York. Google announced the release of the next version of Android and revealed that it is named after the best-selling cookie in the world. Like its namesake, Android Oreo is equal parts crunchy and sweet. On the crunchy side, it delivers enhanced performance, better battery life, and stronger protection for your device. On the sweet side, it provides yummy new features like adaptive icons, notification categories, and of course, Autofill.

Much like Android Oreo, 1Password 6.6 is also made up of layers that are both crunchy and sweet. I hope you’ll forgive me for indulging my inner kid though, as I twist this cookie open and go straight for the deliciously sweet filling.

Mmm… sweet, sweet filling

When Google announced, earlier this year, that the next version of Android would include built-in support for Autofill, we almost lost our collective minds. In fact, I was so excited that I jumped straight into the developer preview and whipped together a prototype to share with you. Since that initial frenzy of excitement, we’ve been hard at work refining and polishing up the implementation in order to deliver the sugary-sweet filling experience that you deserve. With 1Password 6.6, I’m extremely proud to finally get to introduce you to Autofill with 1Password.

Using Autofill with 1Password, you can now save and fill your usernames and passwords in apps.

Saving a login with Android Autofill from AgileBits on Vimeo.

Saving a new Login is as simple as typing your credentials into an app and tapping the sign in button. When 1Password detects that you’ve entered a username and password, you will be asked if you want to save those details. From there, you can unlock 1Password if necessary and adjust the title or destination vault for your new Login item before saving it.

Filling existing Login items is a delectable experience too.

Retrieving a login with Android Autofill from AgileBits on Vimeo.

If 1Password is locked and it detects sign-in fields in an app, it will prompt you to “Autofill with 1Password”. Once you unlock 1Password, you’ll see a list of matching items and have the option of viewing possible matches if they exist. If 1Password is already unlocked, then matching items are displayed immediately below the active text field in the app. Tapping on one of the items will fill the username and password values for that item into the appropriate fields.

If you’ve also sweetened your device with Android Oreo and you’re looking to try that silky smooth filling for yourself, jump on over to our support site for more details about using 1Password to fill and save in apps.

More cookie to enjoy

Once you’re done with the filling in an Oreo, there are still those satisfyingly crunchy cookie wafers to savour. Similarly, we’ve also got a couple more Android Oreo goodies in this update for you to enjoy.

Android Oreo provides more fine-grained control over notifications by dividing them into categories and allowing you to adjust the settings for each category to your liking. You can adjust the sounds and visual indicators for a category or even turn off notifications for that category entirely. To extend this configurability to notifications from 1Password, we’ve separated them into three categories: sync status, sync failure, and 1Password account activity.

Adaptive icons in Android Oreo make it easier for app icons to look their best on any home screen. We thought that was a pretty tasty improvement, so we’ve updated the 1Password icon accordingly. Regardless of whether the launcher on your device favours icons as circles, squircles, rounded squares, or squares, the 1Password icon will adapt to match.

Other delectable treats

With the delicious improvements above, you’d be forgiven for thinking that only cookie-themed treats are available in 1Password 6.6. I’m happy to clear up any such misconception by mentioning a couple of improvements that don’t depend on Android Oreo.

In this update, we’ve added support for downloading and viewing Documents from your 1Password.com account. Once downloaded, an encrypted copy of your Document will be stored on device and made available for viewing whenever you need it.

We’ve also laid the groundwork for some filling that isn’t part of a cookie sandwich. We’ve been working with Google on a protocol that enables direct communication between apps and password managers. We’ve added support for the protocol in this update and we’ll be reaching out to developers about integrating support into their apps in an upcoming blog post.

If you’d like to read about the many additional improvements and fixes in this update that don’t quite fit with the dessert-themed puns, feel free to jump on over to the release notes. I hope you enjoy all of the treats that we packed into this release!

Take a tour of the new 1Password.com

When we introduced 1Password Teams near the end of 2015, it included a brand new way to access 1Password right in your browser. Tasks that were impossible before became not only possible but super easy. A few short months later, we introduced 1Password Families, specially tailored for home use. And a year ago, we introduced 1Password memberships for individuals. As 1Password.com grew to support a greater variety of people, it had to meet the needs of everyone — from individuals to small families to giant corporations.

Today, we’re unveiling the new 1Password.com. This redesign prepares us for the future and all the great features still to come. Whether you’re using 1Password.com at home or as an administrator of a large team at work, the new design is just for you. We’re so thankful for all the feedback you’ve provided, and we’ve used it to make your experience even better.

The Admin Console is dead, long live the Admin Console

We know that managing a team can be difficult. Although I can’t help you resolve any office fridge disputes, as the designer for 1Password.com I can make things easier for you in other ways.

If you’re an administrator on your team, 1Password.com just got a whole lot simpler to navigate. You’ll see one of the biggest changes as soon as you sign in. We moved all the features that used to be buried in the Admin Console out to the sidebar on the Home page. Everything you have permission to do is now directly available to you.

Information that used to be hidden in the Admin Console is now visible at a glance. For example, a list of all your groups is now accessible right in the sidebar, so you can instantly give someone access to all the resources they need with the right permissions automatically set.

Your ideas, implemented


One improvement in particular is a direct result of feedback we’ve received. You can now manage vaults right from the Home page. It’s just one more way we’ve put everything right at your fingertips.

Sweating every detail

The redesign touched on just about every element of 1Password.com:

  • The new Quests section helps new team and family members get started more quickly.
  • Higher contrast list views make it easier to find exactly what you’re looking for.
  • Higher density detail views show you more at a glance.
  • Notifications alert you to recoveries and pending team members in a central location on every screen.

All of this is only the beginning. We plan on doing much more with those detail views and notifications. Keep an eye out!

Good afternoon, good evening, and goodnight

One of my favorite parts of my job is adding a little levity. Now when you sign in to 1Password.com, you’ll see different messages in the sidebar based on the time of day. It wasn’t exactly the number one feature request, but I do hope it makes you smile. :)

Thanks for coming on this little tour with me. We’ve come to the end of it, but we don’t have to stop here. Feedback fuels designers like me; we love to hear from people using what we design. I love talking to people about how they’re using 1Password.com and what else they might want to see in the future. Email me your best ideas.

1Password 6.7 for Windows: a feature buffet

1Password 6.7 for Windows was meant to be a smaller update, but just like you always walk up to the buffet line with the best of intentions, we reached the end of the line with this update and ended up with three plates full of pastries. We have prepared a regular smorgasbord of 58 new features, improvements and fixes for you in this release. So grab a few extra plates and check out the latest Windows goodies. 🙂 Read more

1Password 6.8 for Mac & iOS: The Picnic Edition

It’s been a strange summer here in Syracuse, NY; the beginning of the season was characterized by sub-optimal temperatures punctuated with frequent rainstorms. It’s only recently, a few weeks into July, that the weather has finally made the turn and the mercury is holding steady at a more comfortable level. As we were brainstorming themes for this wonderful release of 1Password 6.8 for both Mac and iOS my good friend Megs said, “Picnics!” and I knew instantly she’d nailed it.

So my friends, get your picnic blanket ready, because we have prepared a basket full of delicious new treats just for you in 1Password 6.8. We hope you’re having a delightful, secure, and scrumptious summer!

TL;DR (Internet speak for ‘Too Long; Didn’t Read’)

• One-time passwords now copy themselves to the clipboard automatically whenever you fill an item that has a one-time password.
• The ability to create vaults has arrived for 1Password.com accounts!
• Item creation and modification dates now appear in the item details on iOS.
• Korean has made a triumphant return!

HOW ABOUT SOME EXTRA SPRINKLES FOR THAT ICE CREAM CONE?


We can’t think of anything better to beat the heat than a nice cold ice-cream in the sunshine … with extra sprinkles, of course. We’d like to think of your one-time passwords as the sprinkles that complete your Login items. Now 1Password automatically copies those one-time passwords when you fill an item with the 1Password Extension, saving you a step and a giving you more time to enjoy that ice cream. Yummy!

We had this feature in beta for quite some time (too long if you ask Rudy, the developer who added this feature 😉) and we’re really excited to have it see the light of day. Given the responses we’ve seen on Twitter so far you all love this one as much as we do. Thank you for all the positive feedback!

YOU CAN NEVER HAVE TOO MANY BASKETS OF GOODIES!


Everyone needs a safe place to store the pie so that no one gets into it before dessert. Now you can create new vaults in your 1Password.com account on the fly and off the cuff right within 1Password itself. No more storing the cherry pie with the cheese, or the cupcakes with the croissants. No matter what your organizational structure – creating new vaults on the go has never been so easy!

The ability to create vaults without having to visit 1Password.com has been one of the most requested features we’ve had and we’re really happy to finally make this feature available. Separating your items out into different vaults gives you a ton of flexibility not only over how you organize your items, but also how you share them. In the Fey household my wife and I share a vault of common logins (bank logins, credit cards, family social security numbers) but we also have a separate vault set up explicitly for estate planning. This vault contains all the information our executor needs in case the worst happens to the both of us. The peace of mind that comes with this setup is absolutely invaluable.

YOU’LL ALWAYS KNOW HOW FRESH YOUR ITEMS ARE.

A great sandwich is a staple at every picnic, but a truly great sandwich is only as good as the ingredients.
The same can be said for your security and an aging password is not a fresh part of your ecosystem.
With this latest update to 1Password for iOS, you’ll always know how fresh your items are by checking the dates your items were created and edited are right there at the bottom of the item details.

KOREAN LANGUAGE IS BACK! KOREAN BBQ, ANYONE?


맛있는 고기구이를 준비하고 사랑하는 이들과 함께 즐겨보시는 것은 어떨까요? 드디어 1Password에서 한국어를 지원하게 되었으니까요! 우리 멋진 한국어 번역자들이 아니었다면 불가능했을 겁니다. 정말 감사드립니다!
소중한 한국어 구사 고객들을 위해 1Password를 완벽하게 준비해두었답니다. 저희는 완벽주의자니까요. 이렇게 언어가 아름답게 돌아오게 된 것을 정말 자랑스럽게 생각하고 있습니다.

FULL RELEASE NOTES

1Password for iOS
You can find the full release notes here.

1Password for Mac
Our Mac release notes can be seen here.

YOUR FAVORITES?

I’d love to hear your favorite feature in this release. Sound off in the comments!

Introducing native messaging for the 1Password extension

I’m really excited to announce a brand new way for 1Password to save and fill in browsers. It’s not a new feature, and chances are you won’t even notice it. It’s called native messaging, and it changes the way 1Password integrates with your browser. In fact, if you use 1Password with Google Chrome, you might already be using it.1

Native messaging makes the 1Password extension faster, more stable, and more compatible in more situations. It improves the performance and reliability of the 1Password extension, and it’s the end result of talking with thousands of 1Password users over the years.

Once upon a time…


When the 1Password extension made its debut for Chrome in 2012, the options for browser extensions to talk to apps were limited. We settled on an approach using WebSockets, which creates a network connection on your computer between 1Password and the browser. Although it’s technically a network connection, the data is only transmitted locally and never leaves your computer. This served us well in the vast majority of cases, but for a significant number people, this connection was unreliable. Proxies, antivirus, and other security software could interfere with the connection and prevent saving and filling. These conflicts caused a lot of pain, especially for Windows users. Over time, it became clear that we needed a better approach.

Enter native messaging

Thankfully, Google led the way and introduced that better approach. Native messaging is a more direct way for browser extensions to communicate with apps. Unlike WebSockets, it doesn’t rely on creating a network connection between your computer and itself.

With native messaging, no longer is Chrome’s connection to 1Password subject to the vagaries of your network and computing environment. No matter how you’ve configured your computer, if you can run 1Password and Chrome, then native messaging will work for you. Last year, we began the transition to replace WebSockets with native messaging. In order for 1Password to use native messaging, we needed to update the extension and the apps. So in April, we released a version of the 1Password extension for Chrome with support for native messaging. Since then, all current versions of 1Password for Mac and Windows have been updated to use the new technology.

What will change?

If you notice any changes, they should only be positive. Communication is nearly instant, and you’ll be able to use the extension as soon as you open your browser. Native messaging removes entire classes of problems that have affected 1Password users for a long time. Conflicts with network proxies and firewalls in corporate computing environments, ad blocking software, and even productivity tools that lock you out of distracting sites should be a thing of the past. Security software that gets spooked by local network connections should relax down from red alert. And many less common scenarios will work much better with native mesaging as well.

How do I get it?!


The first thing to do is check for updates in 1Password to make sure you’re using the latest version available. The latest releases of 1Password all include native messaging. We even updated 1Password 4 for Windows to make sure everyone can take advantage of this advancement on both Mac and Windows. 1Password has built-in support for Google Chrome and many other browsers based on Chrome, like Opera. If you’re using a supported browser, 1Password will switch to native messaging immediately.

Some Chrome-based browsers are supported but require additional configuration to work with native messaging. See our support article for more details.

Conclusion

Native messaging is the future for the 1Password extension. For now it’s supported in Chrome, but support will be coming soon to other browsers like Firefox and Edge. We’ll let you know when native messaging arrives on new browsers — and stay tuned for more posts about the 1Password extension. There’s a lot of exciting stuff going on that I can’t wait to share with you. For now, I’d love to hear your thoughts about native messaging in the comments, and you can always connect with me and the rest of the extension team in the forum.


  1. I will use Chrome as a shorthand for Chrome and browsers based on
    Chromium such as Opera and Vivaldi throughout this post unless there are
    specific differences to note.