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Improved locking in 1Password 5.5 for iOS

Security and convenience

One of the coolest features in 1Password for iOS is the extension. For nearly a year, it’s been really easy to log in to participating apps without having to copy and paste usernames and passwords. Shopping in Safari is also a breeze, now that you can add items to your cart, then fill in your credit card and address with just a couple of taps. The icing on this cake is that you can log in to 1Password using Touch ID instead of tapping out a PIN or your entire Master Password over and over again.

Integral to the extension is the 1Password Lock Service, which determines how often you’re prompted to unlock the app and whether you’re prompted to use quick unlock (Touch ID or PIN Code) or your full Master Password. Thanks to the feedback you’ve provided, the Lock Service has gone through a couple of transformations since iOS 8 was released last fall. The latest update to 1Password is no exception and includes some major improvements that we’re sure you’ll love!

Touch ID: The star of the show

When Apple announced Touch ID on the iPhone 5s in 2013, we knew it would be the perfect way to unlock 1Password for iOS quickly and securely. It took a year before we were able to integrate it, but it was definitely worth the wait!

1Password for iOS Touch ID lock screen

In previous versions of 1Password, cancelling the Touch ID prompt cleared your Master Password from the iOS Keychain, which meant that you would have to enter your Master Password before you could use Touch ID again. This was inconvenient, especially when your goal was just to dismiss the Touch ID prompt without unlocking 1Password.

In version 5.1, we decided to force quit the main app and dismiss the extension when the Touch ID prompt was canceled. It seemed like a good idea, but it was confusing because it looked like the app was crashing. So we went back to the drawing board.

In 1Password 5.5, canceling Touch ID will cause 1Password to display the Master Password prompt, but your password won’t be cleared from the iOS Keychain. This means that you will be able to use Touch ID the next time you open 1Password without typing your Master Password; all you need to do is to tap the fingerprint icon to bring up the prompt.

1Password 5.5 for iOS Master Password lock screen with Touch ID icon

Lock Service: Centralized and better than ever

In 1Password 5.5 for iOS, we have created a “central” Lock Service that is shared between 1Password and its extension. The extension will now use the settings you have specified in the main app. Additionally, when you unlock the 1Password extension, you will also unlock the main app (and vice versa). Those of you who use 1Password on Mac will probably notice that this is similar to the way 1Password and 1Password mini lock and unlock in unison.

As long as you have Lock on Exit disabled, you will no longer be prompted to unlock 1Password moments after you unlock the extension in Safari. Depending upon your Auto-Lock settings, it may be as long as an hour before you’re prompted to unlock 1Password again.

1Password 5 for iOS security settings

iOS Keychain + 1Password Extension = ❤️

In previous versions of 1Password, the extension never saved the Master Password to the iOS keychain. This meant that if your Master Password were cleared from the iOS keychain (like when you restart your iPhone or iPad), you would have to launch the main 1Password app and enter your Master Password before you’d be able to use quick unlock. Entering your Master Password in the extension would allow you to access your vault, but you’d have to keep reentering your Master Password until you finally unlocked the main 1Password app.

Now it doesn’t matter if your Master Password is cleared from the iOS keychain! If you have quick unlock enabled, you’ll just need to enter your Master Password in either the extension or main app—once. After that, you’ll be able to use quick unlock until the next time your Master Password is wiped from the keychain.

It’s taken some time and experimentation to get the main 1Password app and the extension working together just so, but we think our latest changes offer a balance of security and convenience. We hope you’re as happy with this update as we are! We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments and in our discussion forums.

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1Password 5.5 for iOS: The Fun in the Sun Edition

While all the AgileBits kids have been having a fun- & sun-filled summer vacation, our development, docs, and support teams have been toiling away in our air-conditioned nerd caves to bring you the best 1Password for iOS release since the last one!

Our focus for this release was keeping your security as convenient & refreshing as an ice-cold drink on a hot summer day. Let’s take a sip from the improvements to Vaults, Touch ID, the Extension, and the Apple Watch app.

Switching it up

Multiple vaults are the best way to keep different parts of your life secure, without a ton of clutter. We all have our personal data, family vaults, and even work accounts to keep safe & organized.

We’ve made switching between these roles of your life super simple with an all-new vault switcher. Simply tap the new Vault icon in the upper left to get the quick switcher. Select a vault and you are instantly switched to it.


Touchable on demand

In the olden days (meaning yesterday), if you opened 1Password and then tapped Cancel on the Touch ID prompt, 1Password would switch to the Master Password prompt. For your security and convenience, the new Master Password prompt is more flexible: now when you tap Cancel, there is a fingerprint icon on the Master Password screen. Simply tap this icon to immediately restore Touch ID.

Note: If you restart your device, or the Master Password timeout is reached, this new icon will not appear, as the Master Password will still be needed in those situations.


Improved short-term memory

The extension and the main app now share unlock settings, so when you unlock the main app, the extension will remember this and use Touch ID.

Again, restarting the device or reaching a Master Password timeout will still require you to enter your Master Password.

Never drop a PIN again

Unique passwords are great for your logins, and unique PINs for your credit cards are also fantastic. Remembering them? Not so much.

Credit Card items on Apple Watch will now show the PIN field. The next time you buy chips & salsa with your credit card you can take a quick look at your wrist for your purchasing needs.

Closing the Vault

There are many more improvements and fixes in 1Password 5.5 for iOS, and you can check them all out in the release notes or in the in-app Message Center, located in Settings.

While I need to close up the vault for this release, the team can’t wait to show you all the great things we’re working on for the next one! In the meantime, we’d love to hear your thoughts. Leave your comment here, in our discussion forums, on Twitter/ADN, or on Facebook.

Aleen and Chalene, sittin’ in a tree…

…talkin’ s-e-c-u-r-i-ty!

Chalene Johnson

Chalene Johnson is a motivational speaker and best-selling author. In June of this year, her Twitter account was hacked, as was her main Instagram account. She shared this sad tale on her podcasts, The Chalene Show and Chalene Johnson’s Build Your Tribe.

Upon completing the tedious and time-consuming task of recovering from the hack, Chalene researched password managers to ensure she’d never have to endure such an experience again. At the end of her quest to find the best password manager, Chalene discovered 1Password!

Aleen Simms

To talk to her listeners about 1Password, Chalene invited our very own Aleen Simms. They discuss everything from pricing to basic 1Password use and password hygiene. Have a listen, and pick up a handy tip or three along the way.

The episode is fittingly titled, The Most Important App You Will Ever Download, and you can listen to it in iTunes. Thank you for the invitation, Chalene!

1Password Core Developer

Wanted: 1Password Core Developer

Do you like back ends and cannot lie? We’re expanding the 1Password team and are looking for a developer to set up shop in the common code layer that lives between 1Password for Mac and 1Password for iOS.

Who are you?

Well, you are an experienced individual who’s passionate about code and security (you’ll get bonus points for being extra passionate about 1Password too!); and you are someone who can help us raise the bar in terms of code quality, testability, and reliability.

You will be working with all sorts of fascinating things: data model, sync, security, and many other features shared between the apps. You’ll be tasked with awesome responsibilities like re-engineering core parts of the apps, fixing bugs whose reproducibility is minimal, and helping us define the future of 1Password. (With great responsibility comes great power, but don’t let it go to your head!)

Here are a few points we’d love to see in your resume:

  • Has expert knowledge of Objective-C and its runtime
  • Is intimately familiar with Foundation & CoreFoundation
  • Knows memory management rules like the back of their hand
  • Has the scars of experience with threading
  • Loves SQLite
  • Has a strong working knowledge of libdispatch

Want to impress us? Tell us about…

  • A sync system you’ve built
  • The socket servers you’ve designed
  • Crypto stuff you’ve used
  • XPC services you’ve deployed
  • The time you were put in charge of a designing a system that uses all of the above and had it successfully deployed to millions of customers

Curiously absent from this list is AppKit and UIKit experience. While you’ll be expected to contribute to both the Mac and iOS user interfaces at some point, it isn’t the focus of this position.

Who are we?

We’re a team devoted to our customers and the quality of our software. While we are physically headquartered in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the majority of our ‘Bits work remotely from around the globe (mostly the States, other parts of Canada, and Europe).

Everyone on our team gets the opportunity to interact directly with our customers. Experiencing customer reactions and feedback first-hand is extremely valuable and empowers everyone at AgileBits to do something to continually improve 1Password, whether that’s by writing great articles, refactoring and perfecting code, or supporting our customers around the clock.

If your interest has been piqued, we’d love to hear from you. Email us a resume and an overview of the apps you’ve worked on.

We can’t wait to work with you!

<3 The 1Password for Mac & iOS Teams

Featured Image: Google Chrome (Scenery)

Adventures in beta testing, continued: Google Chrome Canary

Or, If you’re living on the bleeding edge, expect some paper cuts.

The Chromium team (the open-source project behind Google Chrome) is doing an amazing job of constantly moving the web forward and making the web a safer place for users of Google Chrome.

Recently, many users of the latest pre-release versions of Google Chrome have notified us that the 1Password extension refuses to work in OS X and Windows, showing the following error message:

1Password extension looking for app

What is going on?

The Google Chrome developers have started implementing changes to the types of connections extensions are allowed to establish. These changes are part of a larger and more complex plan to harden Google Chrome against certain kinds of web-based attacks (like cross-site request forgery attacks), in which a malicious website or extension attempts to compromise internal network devices and processes listening on the localhost IP address.

Unfortunately, in the process of implementing these new security measures, something was broken in a way that results in many Chrome extensions, including 1Password, not working anymore in the Canary build and the dev channel of Chrome.

What seems to be the issue?

The 1Password web browser extension needs to communicate with a helper process that runs in the background to access your 1Password data (1Password mini in OS X and 1Password Helper in Windows). This is facilitated by establishing WebSocket protocol connections at the localhost address of a computer. WebSocket connections are similar to the typical HTTP requests your web browser performs when visiting a website.

The way we understand the current situation is this:

  1. An extension tries to open a ws:// (WebSocket) connection.
  2. Chrome recognises the chrome-extension protocol and checks whether the connection attempt has a secure origin.
  3. If Chrome determines that the connection is not secure, it rejects the attempt and any further connection requests are never even attempted beyond that.

In the case of 1Password, this results in the extension thinking that the 1Password application does not exist on the PC/Mac in the first place or that something is blocking the WebSocket connection.

What is going to happen?

This is an ongoing issue that we’re still investigating but so far it is clear that the Chromium development community has recognised that many extensions communicate with host applications using WebSocket and other protocols. To our current knowledge, they are treating this issue as a regression in need of fixing, but any fix requires careful consideration in light of their efforts to increase security.

There are various active discussion threads and bug reports related to this situation in the Chromium project. To name only a few:

What to do now?

Testing pre-release software can be fun and is incredibly useful for the developers of that software and the developers of apps that interact with it — seriously, we love our beta testers. 1Password supports the latest stable builds of Safari, Chrome, Firefox, and Opera. While we make every effort to maintain compatibility with Beta, Dev, Nightly, Canary builds or other birds or browsers, we can’t guarantee that 1Password will always work as browsers go through their various development and release cycles.

If 1Password is as essential to your daily life as it is to ours, our suggestion is to temporarily return your browser to the stable version and check out the new Canary build/dev channel releases in a week or two — did I mention how much we appreciate beta testers sending in feedback? If you do want to live on the bleeding edge, please be aware of the potential for bugs in development and public beta versions of browsers and software in general and be patient with the developers of browsers, apps, and extensions as they negotiate a shifting landscape. We’ve added the article, “Prerelease (beta, dev, nightly) browser builds,” to our knowledge base to keep you apprised of any issues with unfinished versions of browsers.

As with any other questions regarding 1Password, please sound off about any issues you run into when using 1Password with pre-release versions of browsers in our discussion forums.

Unspeakable Passwords

Unspeakable Passwords: Jeff Goldberg talks to Passwords15

Passwords! They safeguard our most important information, but they’re such a pain, aren’t they? Every site imposes a different set of restrictions on password creation and they seem to get stolen from one place or another every other day, but they are absolutely necessary.

Given that passwords aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, it stands to reason that something must be done to thwart the increasing numbers of Not Nice People who would do us harm. I don’t know about you, but thinking about this stuff makes my brain hurt, which is why I’ve been using 1Password for almost 10 years.

Fortunately, there are some very, very smart folks who don their proverbial white hats and convene twice a year at an event called Passwords, where they figure out how to keep us safe. Launched in 2010, this conference focuses on the analysis of authentication solutions, in an effort to better understand and meet the challenges of digital authentication.

This year, our very own Jeff Goldberg was in attendance at #passwords15. If you don’t know who he is, allow me to introduce you. He’s our Chief Defender Against the Dark Arts, and a self-proclaimed explanation junkie. Seriously, he explains everything. At length. And very, very well. This makes him an excellent candidate to give a talk at such a conference, which is fantastic, because that’s exactly what he did.

In his presentation, Jeff talks about pronounceable passwords, entering them on various devices, Diceware, the successor to PBKDF2, and more. Check it out! You’ll learn, you’ll laugh, it’ll be great.

Presentation slides

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1Password and Windows 10: On the Edge of greatness

With the release of Microsoft’s latest operating system, you might be asking yourself, “Self, am I ready for Windows 10?” And while we at AgileBits wouldn’t presume to answer that question for you, we’re pleased to announce that 1Password is ready when you are!

Using Windows 10

A number of us have already been using Windows 10 regularly—and loving it. And it turns out that 1Password loves Windows 10 too! But while you’ll be able to hit the ground running and use 1Password as you always have, just be sure that your other hardware and software are ready to make the leap. And back up, back up, and back up some more.

Livin’ on the Edge

One significant change in Windows 10 that will be of interest to 1Password users is the addition of Microsoft’s latest and greatest web browser, Edge. Previously known as “Spartan,” we’ve found it to be fast, stable, and rather pleasant to use.

However, there’s a catch: Edge does not yet support extensions, so at this time there is no way to use the 1Password extension in Edge as you do in Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer.

The good news is that Internet Explorer is still around, and 1Password works great in IE 11, along with our other favourite browsers. Word on the street is that Microsoft Edge will support extensions in the near future; we’re looking forward to seeing if that will enable us to provide 1Password extension support in the new browser.

Wi-Fi Sense, and the cost of convenience

One thing that you should know about is a new feature called Wi-Fi Sense. This feature has been present on Windows Phone for a while now, but it’s a new addition to the desktop OS. Wi-Fi Sense shares Wi-Fi network access between you and your Outlook, Skype, and Facebook contacts. While this may be convenient (even magical) for some, it also presents some security fodder for your consideration. With Windows 10 now unleashed, it’s especially important to understand how Wi-Fi Sense works, and then make an informed decision.

The Lowdown

Wi-Fi Sense can share most of your saved Wi-Fi connections. Windows keeps your saved Wi-Fi connections when you upgrade, so if you’ve been using Windows for a while, this might be a lengthy list. All the networks to which you’ve previously connected have the potential to be shared using Wi-Fi Sense.

It’s also important to note that Wi-Fi Sense doesn’t let you individually choose with whom you share your Wi-Fi connections; rather, they’re available to all of your contacts on a service (Outlook, Skype, Facebook) if that service is enabled.

The Downlow

One aspect of Wi-Fi Sense that is easy to overlook is that sharing is a two-way street: not only are you sharing your saved Wi-Fi connection information with your contacts, they’re also sharing theirs with you. Additionally, open hotspots are crowdsourced; unless you opt out, your Windows 10 devices will automatically connect to many unsecured Wi-Fi networks. Since these can be compromised or spoofed, we definitely recommend using protection (such as VPNs and encryption) any time you connect to Wi-Fi networks you don’t control.

The more you know…

If you’ve only ever used a wired connection, Windows won’t have a Wi-Fi connection saved, and therefore won’t be able to give it away to Facebook Guy and the rest. You can disable Wi-Fi Sense in Windows 10 by going to Wi-Fi > Network settings > Manage Wi-Fi settings and flipping the switch to turn it off. If you add “_optout” to end of your SSID (network name), your Wi-Fi network will be opted out of Wi-Fi Sense.

Windows 10 Wi-Fi Sense

Microsoft’s Wi-Fi Sense FAQ contains a lot of information to help you decide whether to keep this feature enabled. Here are some highlights:

  • When using Express setup, many of the Wi-Fi Sense options are enabled by default
  • Your contacts don’t see your Wi-Fi network password
  • You choose which Wi-Fi network connections you want to share
  • Network connections are shared only with contacts who also have Wi-Fi Sense enabled
  • Network connections are shared with your contacts, but not their contacts

If you’re a Windows Insider or early adopter, we hope you’re enjoying Windows 10. If you have any questions or feedback about 1Password, please share your thoughts in our discussion forums. We love hearing from you.

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Accessibility in 1Password for iOS

At AgileBits we believe that everyone should be secure online. That means we want 1Password to be usable by as many people as possible. We have worked hard to implement many features that make 1Password more accessible. In this post I will explain some of the technologies we’ve taken advantage of to improve accessibility in 1Password for iOS.

What We Have Done

While our efforts are ongoing, here are some of the areas in 1Password where we offer accessibility features.

Colour Vision Deficiency and Password Readability

You may have noticed that when viewing a password, 1Password colours numbers and symbols differently. This is not only for convenience. We have carefully chosen colours easily seen by those who have trouble distinguishing different shades of a colour. We have tested for deficiencies related to protan, deutan, and tritan.

Those with achromatopsia (no ability to distinguish colour) must rely on character shapes to tell them apart. 1Password therefore offers a choice of fonts to make it easy to distinguish between the letter o and the number zero; and between lowercase l, capital I, and the number one.


Large Type

Sometimes you have to enter a password on another device that cannot run 1Password (e.g. a combination lock, employer’s computer, etc.). For this reason, we provide the large type feature that, when activated, displays the password as large as possible for easy reading when entering it elsewhere.


Dynamic Type

iOS provides a great feature called dynamic type. This allows apps to dynamically adjust the size of text to user settings. You can experiment with dynamic type in the iOS Settings app in General > Accessibility > Larger Text.

As a developer, it’d be too easy just to turn the feature on and leave it at that. But that would result in text that grows too large for the screen and ends up getting truncated to the point that it is unreadable, or it would push interface elements so far out of the way that they are unusable. Less important text could also crowd out more important text.

We’ve taken care to limit text size where necessary and ensure inevitable truncation happens such that the most important part of the text is still shown. We’re even looking at ways to rework the UI when the text is too large to fit.



Apple has a fantastically comprehensive voice-over system in iOS. In 1Password we take advantage of that by ensuring all of our interface elements and data values are properly labeled for accessibility so VoiceOver can read them aloud in a context that makes the app more usable. We have also minimized redundancies in describing the interface to make sure relevant interface elements are described quickly and effectively. To keep your passwords secure, 1Password will not read your passwords aloud unless you explicitly request it.

Work in Progress

As interfaces in software change and new features get added, accessibility support can change too. If there’s an accessibility feature you would like to have, or something you feel is not implemented as well as it could be, please let us know! We welcome feedback and want to make 1Password more usable for all of our awesome users!

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The endless waltz: making custom UI for Windows Modern

Branding is a promise. It’s a guarantee of what to expect and a derivation of an identity. Here at AgileBits, we have strong brand identity and our customers can immediately recognize our app, no matter the platform on which they see it. As a recent addition to the AgileBits family, working on the latest addition to the 1Password application family, one of my priorities has been to ensure our new app feels like 1Password. But this, like so many other things, is easier said than done.

At first blush (and second, and third, and…), Windows Modern applications look nothing like apps on Mac, iOS, Android or any other platform; right out of the gate, we had our work cut out for us and we had to decide how to balance the unique Windows Modern style with what has come to be recognized as the 1Password style. In the end, we decided to keep the Windows Modern app as true to the 1Password style as possible. Despite having to deal with an overly verbose pattern for overriding the style template (in some cases 100 lines of code just to change a single property for a button) we continued to customize nearly every area of the app; when the dust had finally settled, our shared stylesheet (for phone and desktop) was the largest single file in our entire project (~1200 lines of code).

But we were able to stay true to the 1Password brand, as evident in our lock screen:

So it was well worth the effort, and we certainly learned a few new tricks along the way! But styling with such reckless abandon does have a cost.

There will be blood (and hacks)

Issues first began to arise when we started testing theme-switching for Windows Phone. Windows Phone gives users the ability to switch between a dark and a light theme. This is a hallmark feature of Windows Phone and one that users have come to expect. But of course, this feature is only available on Windows Phone; the iOS and Android platforms don’t have this capability by default, which added a new wrinkle: do we introduce a feature on Windows Phone that is not available on our other mobile platforms? We also noticed very poor performance with accessibility features when using high-contrast themes, and ease-of-access font scaling had a very low ceiling before the majority of text was cut off.

Why did we perform so poorly? In part, it was because of all the customization we had done. We became so focused on achieving the 1Password look and feel that we customized nearly everything, including many things that we never needed to touch. We also used the RequestedTheme property heavily, which allowed us to force a page to always render in a specific theme; this is a big no-no for a universal app. But more than anything else, it’s how the platform handles custom styles. The moment you create a custom style, you’re entirely accountable for it: you must tell it exactly how to behave under every single scenario a user may throw at you; and on the Windows Modern platform, there are a lot of possible scenarios. There are two default themes for Windows Phone (and two other high-contrast themes), and Windows desktop has the default theme (not light, not dark, just right) along with four other high-contrast themes. Yep, that’s eight themes developers need to support when they choose to add some of their own styling and branding to their apps. The moment you decide to change a background colour, adjust a font’s opacity, or change letter spacing, you’re abandoned by the Windows app platform, and left to your own devices. This desertion isn’t too much of an issue for developers working primarily on Windows modern, as the support the platform gives you to handle all of these scenarios right out of the box is excellent. But it’s an unfeasible expectation for Windows to extend this support to developers who customize their apps so heavily, so we got to work and began getting our stylesheets under control.

The taming of the shrew

After all of our customization, we had to take a step back and see how we could make 1Password work with the Windows Modern ecosystem, instead of against it.

We had no desire to rewrite all of the styles and themes that Microsoft had given us for free with the operating system. The code was ready and available; all we had to do was let the platform do its work without losing our brand in the platform.

Our first order of business was getting our stylesheets under control. We went through the entire app, page by page, and removed any properties we could live without, thereby giving responsibility back to Windows. We then rebuilt support for all the missing themes by first including them explicitly in our stylesheets, and only overriding the system colors in the default or base theme; for high contrast and light/dark themes, we once again passed responsibility back to Windows.


Prior to coming to work at AgileBits, I gained a lot of experience working on web accessibility for the Canadian Government, and we often discussed how different platforms handled accessibility.  On the Mac, instead of separate themes, users are given sliders in the OS preferences to adjust contrast and invert colours when necessary. Keeping these preferences at the OS level takes a lot of the responsibility away from app developers. While it can seem a bit daunting to oversee eight themes (at least) on Windows, the aesthetic and practical usefulness of these themes cannot be denied. For example, users can create custom themes that can be saved to their profile and be made available on the different PCs they use. Also, these themes being predefined make selecting appropriate themes much easier for users.


Branding is a promise. This is our endless waltz, and we cannot fail our dance partners. It’s a delicate balance that we must strike between Windows Modern and the 1Password experience, so that we may engender harmony among 1Password and Windows users.

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Adventures in beta testing: 1Password, El Capitan, and iOS 9

Let’s talk about betas. Specifically, let’s talk about Apple’s operating system betas. It used to be that you had to be an active member of the Apple Developer Program to get access to the betas. Last year, Apple launched a beta software program that enables anyone to sign up to test-drive pre-release versions of OS X. This year, for the first time, anyone can sign up to evaluate iOS 9 beta in addition to OS X 10.11 El Capitan beta.


There’s something thrilling about using beta software. It’s exciting to experience the software development process, with frequent updates that fix and improve things before our very eyes. It’s gratifying to participate in that process, seeing our bug reports get resolved and change requests considered and sometimes implemented. I don’t know about you, but I love feeling like I’ve helped make an improvement from which everyone using the software will benefit.

Hark, the cheers from developers far and wide

One of the most difficult things for software developers is getting the feedback they need before an application version goes public. This is because the pool of beta testers is generally so small. We could think everything is just fine, and then it gets out there and—BOOM—suddenly there are all these edge cases that never came up during the beta, because there are so many more people using it.

Public betas can be a real boon to developers, in that they help to increase the size of the beta pool and the degree to which the beta application is tested.

Hard hats required

under construction

Perhaps you remember those “Under construction” images from the early days of web publishing? It’s a very real metaphor for beta software. The most important thing to remember1 is that beta software is incomplete. Some things will not be implemented yet, some will be broken, and some may cause unexpected system kerfufflery.

Here are a few tips to help make your beta experience safe and enjoyable:

Spare a square

Ideally, beta software should be installed on spare hardware. If you have only one Mac, you can install El Capitan beta on separate partition of your Mac’s hard drive. If the iPhone you use every day is your only iOS device, it’s probably best not to install iOS 9 beta. If you have a non-critical iPad or an iPod touch, that would be a good place to install the beta.

Back that thang up

I know some of you are going to ignore me completely and install the betas on your mission-critical devices. Before you do that, please make sure to create a reliable backup!

We hear you

Your feedback is indispensable. If you notice anything wonky, be sure to report it to developers. I’ve seen beta issues reported in App Store reviews. While developers certainly read those and learn from them, they have no way of reaching out to the customer to help. It is best to contact developers directly with your beta feedback.

If you’re using 1Password beta, we have dedicated beta discussion forums. The beta forums are monitored by our developers and our support team is around to help you seven days a week!

If something you report isn’t immediately addressed, don’t worry. Developers may not be able to do anything about it just yet. Rest assured that the issue will be resolved as quickly as possible.

1Password 5, El Capitan, and iOS 9

I’m happy to tell you that we have thus far encountered no major issues in our testing. I have noticed a couple of graphical and layout issues in El Capitan beta, but it’s too early to tell whether the issues are in 1Password 5 for Mac or in El Capitan beta. We don’t want to spend time fixing something that may not actually be broken on our end, so for the moment we’re waiting to see how things pan out. We’ve documented the issues so we don’t lose track of them.

How to test 1Password beta for Mac

You are warmly invited to join our family of beta testers. The more, the merrier! 1Password 5.4 beta for Mac doesn’t require El Capitan beta, but it does require that you use the AgileBits Store version of 1Password, not the Mac App Store version. It’s very easy to switch over, but you will not be able to sync with iCloud.

How to test 1Password beta for iOS

Apple’s TestFlight Beta Testing program enables developers to extend a limited number of invitations to customers. There has been a great deal of interest in 1Password beta for iOS, and we are not looking for additional testers at this time. You can be the first to hear about opportunities to join our beta family for iOS by following @1PasswordBeta on Twitter.

1Password beta for Mac does not require 1Password beta for iOS.

1Password happy face

Have fun!

I lied earlier. The most important thing is to have fun, but keeping in mind the foibles of beta software and protecting yourself against them are a close second. =)